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How Do the 2020 Democrats' Climate Change Plans Compare?

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Annie Ropeik
/
NHPR News

Many of the Democratic presidential candidates will be in Concord Wednesday for a marathon town hall on climate change.

The day-long forum focuses on young voters – especially students working in or studying climate and clean energy issues.

Each candidate will get about an hour to talk about their climate change plans and take questions from students in related fields.

(Scroll down to see NHPR’s updated analysis of the current Democratic candidates’ climate stances, and click here to see a detailed spreadsheet comparing their latest plans.)

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Slated to appear at the town hall series at the Bank of New Hampshire Stage in Concord, as of Tuesday, are Democrats Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Andrew Yang, Tom Steyer, Michael Bennet and Deval Patrick. 

Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren are set to be represented by surrogates.

Republican candidate Bill Weld is also scheduled also speak.

The forum, hosted by Dartmouth College, Stonyfield Organic and the Hubbard Brook Research Foundation, is free and open to the public, space permitting, beginning 7 a.m. Wednesday. 

It will also be livestreamed here.

Where do the 2020 Democratic presidential hopefuls stand on climate change? Click a candidate’s picture below to read their plan. These graphics reflect the field as of Monday.

Scroll on to see how the candidates' plans compare. Graphics by Sara Plourde.

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Click here to see our December version of these comparisons and hear what voters think of them, or click here for our detailed comparison with the latest updates.

Sara has been a part of NHPR since 2011. Her work includes data visualizations, data journalism, original stories reported on the web, video, photos and illustrations. She is responsible for the station's visual style and print design, as well as the user experience of NHPR's digital platforms.
Annie has covered the environment, energy, climate change and the Seacoast region for NHPR since 2017. She leads the newsroom's climate reporting project, By Degrees.

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