Annie Ropeik | New Hampshire Public Radio

Annie Ropeik

Reporter: Climate, Energy, Environment, Seacoast

Credit Samantha Searles / NHPR

Annie Ropeik joined NHPR’s reporting team in 2017, following stints with public radio stations and collaborations across the country. She has reported everywhere from fishing boats, island villages and cargo terminals in Alaska, to cornfields, factories and Superfund sites in the Midwest.

Her work has appeared on NPR, the BBC and CNN, and earned recognition from PRNDI and multiple state press clubs.

Originally from Silver Spring, MD, Annie caught the public media bug during internships at NPR in Washington and WBUR in Boston. She studied classics at Boston University and enjoys a good PDF, the rule of threes and meeting other people’s dogs.

Ways to Connect

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Our new climate change reporting initiative, By Degrees, begins in an unprecedented time – one where people are making seismic shifts in their lifestyles and attitudes in response to COVID-19 and the Black Lives Matter movement. 

Many of our listeners have wondered: why haven’t people reacted the same way to the climate emergency, and could that be about to change? 


Britta Greene for NHPR

By Degrees is a multi-year reporting project from NHPR that will tell stories about climate change in New Hampshire - its challenges, solutions and connections to other forces shaping our lives today. 

The project begins today. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with lead reporter Annie Ropeik, who covers energy, the environment and the Seacoast for NHPR, to learn more about the project's goals, what to expect this week and how listeners can contribute.  

NH Electric Coop Facebook

New Hampshire state regulators have agreed to hold a virtual public hearing next week on plans to resume utility service disconnections.

The state recently ended its pandemic-related moratorium on shutoffs for overdue payments. Now, the Public Utilities Commission is deciding how utilities should resume the shutoffs, as well as late payment fees.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen returned to in-person campaigning on the Seacoast Wednesday, positioning climate change at the center of her re-election bid.

Shaheen, a Democrat, was at Throwback Brewery in North Hampton – joined, in masks and at a distance, by environmentalists, students and groups endorsing her.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

NHPR’s new climate change reporting project, By Degrees, begins in the midst of a global pandemic, mass protests against systemic racism, a presidential election and an economic crisis.

We need your help to tell new stories of how New Hampshire is living through climate change at this historic moment.

What are we missing? What do you want to know? How is climate change affecting you right now? 

A new study says children drinking from private water wells may be more likely to have unsafe levels of lead in their bloodstreams.

CDC.gov

New Hampshire is reporting its first case of mosquito-borne illness for 2020. A Loudon resident was hospitalized and is now recovering from Jamestown Canyon Virus.

Brendan Wood / Creative Commons

New Hampshire’s utility consumer advocate wants more transparency and public input on plans to lift the state's ban on utility shutoffs this month.

In a new emergency petition, ratepayer advocate Don Kreis says the state's electric, water and gas utilities are reporting large swaths of customers who've held off paying their bills in the past few months.

First Street Foundation

A major new study says federal flood maps have far underestimated how many properties in New Hampshire and nationwide are at risk from substantial flooding, now and in the coming decades.

The report, out Monday, comes from a range of academic institutions and the nonprofit First Street Foundation.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

A panel looking at redeveloping the former Laconia State School is pushing back on concerns about a request for money from the state.

The Lakeshore Redevelopment Planning Commission has asked for $16 million in the state's capital budget.

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stock photo

A new study, commissioned by advocates in New Hampshire, shows that most firefighters’ protective gear is treated extensively with toxic PFAS chemicals.  

Scientists at the University of Notre Dame picked up the issue, with funding from the National Science Foundation and the firefighter-focused Last Call Foundation, after a request by a Granite State couple.

Patrick Mansell / flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire will longer ask aspiring lawyers about their mental health history in order to pass the bar.

The state court system joins Massachusetts, New York and a handful of other jurisdictions that have recently made the change.

New Hampshire’s decision comes from the committee of lawyers that judges what’s known as the character and fitness of people who want to practice law in the state.

They say they’ll continue to consider applicants’ past conduct. But they’ll no longer ask about history, diagnosis, or treatment or mental health or substance use problems.

Phot via chrisviolette.net

Protesters gathered at Whole Foods in Bedford this weekend after the store sent two workers home for wearing masks supporting Black Lives Matter.

After being sent home several times, the women say they were told the store has a policy against any slogans or messaging outside the company's own. They think it's unfair.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Near-drought conditions in southern New Hampshire are straining vegetable farmers in the midst of planting season, after more than a month without substantial rainfall.

The state expects to soon declare a drought in the southern tier and lower Lakes Region, after an abnormally dry spring and a winter without much snow to recharge streams and groundwater.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Seacoast beaches have been crowded this weekend with people trying to beat the heat, though some coronavirus restrictions remain in effect. Parts of the shoulders of Route 1A have reopened for parking, but the state beach lots are only accepting 50 percent of their normal capacity to encourage physical distancing.

Wikimedia Commons

Pandemic closures are limiting the options in New Hampshire for people who need to take shelter from the heat this weekend.

Much of the state will see temperatures in the 90s, with high humidity, through early next week.

But it may fall short of an official heat advisory, which is what cities like Manchester and Nashua use to activate their heat response plans.

NHEC Facebook

The New Hampshire Electric Co-op will not add a focus on broadband to its official mission, but supporters of the effort say they expect the attention on rural connectivity will continue.

Members voting in the co-op election that ended this week fell just short of the two-thirds majority needed to pass the proposal, which would have had the co-op agree to “facilitate access to broadband” alongside existing services.

Jessica Hunt / NHPR

Southern New Hampshire looks to be headed for a drought this summer, after more than a month without any significant rainfall following a low-snow winter.

The state got about half an inch of rain on May 15. 

James Gathany / CDC

A group of New Hampshire doctors wants two Republican U.S. Senate candidates to walk back recent statements opposing mandatory vaccinations.

Ed Meyer / Dartmouth

New Hampshire colleges will likely continue with some aspects of virtual learning when students return to campuses this fall. It's a particular challenge for disciplines like earth science, which rely on field trips and physical lab work.

Annie Ropeik screenshot / NHPR

The state Senate votes Tuesday on a bill that would make permanent much of the telehealth system that has emerged in New Hampshire during the pandemic.

Via USDA website

New Hampshire's attorney general is joining the opposition to a federal challenge to net energy metering policy, ahead of the end of public input on the case Monday.

Dozens of other states, companies and groups and companies have already joined the case before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Many filed comments opposing the petition.

NH Electric Coop Facebook

Members of the New Hampshire Electric Co-op will finish voting Tuesday on whether to add broadband service to their utility’s mission.

The push to bring better internet to rural towns has already drawn interest from developers, as coronavirus heightens the focus on connectivity.

Retired journalist Richard Knox of Center Sandwich has helped lead the campaign to get the 80,000-member co-op to agree to “facilitate access to broadband” as part of its by-laws.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

An environmental group in Nottingham is appealing to the New Hampshire Supreme Court to try to get involved in an ongoing legal battle over community rights. 

NH State Parks

The state will not conduct some routine sampling of inland beaches this summer due the pandemic.

The Department of Environmental Services says they’ll focus on monitoring and responding to blooms of toxic algae at freshwater shores this season.

They will not regularly sample those beaches for fecal bacteria as they have in other years.

They say their lab capacity and other logistics have been hampered by the coronavirus.

Heather Hayward / U.S. Air Force

A new bill sponsored by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen would help military families get tested for PFAS chemical exposure.

The proposal would cover people who are or were stationed at hundreds of military installations with PFAS contamination.

PFAS are toxic chemicals that persist in the environment and were used in a kind of firefighting foam that is still stockpiled on many bases.

NHPR

Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant remains offline after experiencing its second unexpected shutdown in about a week on Saturday night.

The incidents stem from the same system, which the plant's owner NextEra says it’s now trying to repair. Federal officials say the issue, known as a “manual scram,” has posed no danger to the public or plant workers.

Steve and Michelle Gerdes / Flicker CC

Advocates are calling on New Hampshire’s congressional delegation to support job training for clean energy projects as part of COVID-19 economic recovery.

Reps. Annie Kuster and Chris Pappas joined state nonprofits for a roundtable on the issue Friday.

The lawmakers and their Senate colleagues have joined recent calls for renewable energy investment in upcoming stimulus bills. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Leaders in Manchester, including Mayor Joyce Craig, are calling for two of the city's aldermen to resign after reportedly making racist statements on Facebook.

A local Black Lives Matter organizer says Alderman-At-Large Joe Kelly Levasseur called him a derogatory slur in a private message.

JOE GRATZ / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

Democratic state lawmakers will get another hearing in a lawsuit over Gov. Chris Sununu’s authority to distribute federal coronavirus aid.

The complaint dates to mid-April. It argues that the legislature should get a say in Sununu's spending during the state of emergency.  

Superior Court Judge David Anderson previously denied the lawmakers’ request for an emergency injunction to stop that spending.

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