Donald Trump | New Hampshire Public Radio

Donald Trump

The COVID-19 crisis has brought significant challenges for American women, increasing their burden of care and raising unemployment levels to greater numbers compared to men.

As the general election inches closer, new polling shows that a subset of American women remain a wildcard, and they could be a crucial swing vote if the race for president gets close.

Updated at 6:08 p.m. ET

President Trump on Friday evening struck a more somber tone talking about the death of George Floyd and recent protests in Minneapolis. The comments at the White House came after a day of criticism over a tweet that referred to protesters there as thugs and prompted a warning from Twitter, which said the president glorified violence.

More than 1,100 former Department of Justice officials are calling on Attorney General William Barr to resign after his department lowered the prison sentence recommendation for Roger Stone, a longtime ally of President Trump, in a move that's led to accusations of political interference.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Steve Stepanek called it “the big reveal.”

He paused for effect. He then donned a red Keep America Great ball cap and announced:

“I’ve been in the closet too long. I’m happy to be out, and I want all the other Trump supporters to come out of the closet and get out there and support and elect Donald Trump in New Hampshire and across this great country.”

Updated 5:43 p.m. ET

The Senate has voted to acquit President Trump on both articles of impeachment — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — ending a months-long process of investigations and hearings and exposing a sharply divided Congress and country.

Acquittal on the first article was 52-48, with Republican Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah becoming the only senator to cross party lines. Trump was cleared of the second charge on a straight party-line vote of 53-47.

Convicting and removing Trump from office would have required 67 votes.

White House

President Trump is delivering the State of the Union address tonight before Congress. NHPR is carrying the speech live, and it can be listened to online at NHPR.org

Watch the president's remarks below:

Andrew Harnik/AP

On Tuesday night, Feb. 4, 2020, President Donald Trump is scheduled to deliver his State of the Union Address to a joint session of Congress. Afterwards, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is scheduled to deliver the Democratic Party's response. 

NHPR will carry NPR live anchored coverage of the State of the Union Address and the Democratic Party response. 

As the impeachment trial of President Trump moves into the questioning phase, we look back at the arguments presented before the Senate by the House Managers and Trump's defense team, and what to watch in the next phase of the trial. 

Don't miss Civics 101's "Extra Credit" on presidential impeachments, and listen to their episode on impeachment

Original air date: Wednesday, January 29th, 2020.

File photo

New Hampshire environmentalists and lawmakers say a new Trump administration rule could lead to more drinking water pollution.

The rule is a replacement for the Obama-era regulation known as Waters of the U.S., or WOTUS. Trump has long argued it was too burdensome to farmers and developers.

Trump’s now-final WOTUS replacement will remove federal oversight from millions of miles of wetlands and streams that don't feed directly into navigable waterways.

When President Trump's defense team delivers its opening statement in the Senate impeachment trial next week, famed defense attorney Alan Dershowitz will have a starring role.

But in an interview with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly on Friday, he sought to make clear that his involvement is limited to arguing that the two articles of impeachment do not satisfy the constitutional criteria for removing the president from office.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The House of Representatives is taking the formal step of voting to transmit the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the Senate, which will hold a trial. The House voted to impeach Trump last month on two articles, abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

After the House vote to transmit, the articles are physically brought to the Senate. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said that the trial will likely start Tuesday. 

NPR / screen capture

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi this morning is announcing who will present the case for President Donald Trump's impeachment in the Senate trial.

Watch the press conference live at approximately 10 a.m.

[Sign up for Primarily Politics, NHPR's weekly politics newsletter]

Nasser Nasser / AP

President Trump is scheduled to speak to the nation at 11 a.m. today following attacks on military bases in Iraq where U.S. troops are stationed.

Trump tweeted on Tuesday night that "All is well!" and that an assessment of the casualties was underway. Iran said the missiles were launched as an act of self-defense after the U.S. killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani in Iraq.

Impeachment is the ultimate form of censure, a permanent mark on a president. But there's little indication that President Trump has been chastened by last week's impeachment vote. In fact, it's quite the opposite. Trump is leaning in, attacking political opponents in deeply personal terms and setting records for rally length and the sheer volume of his tweets.

"I think it's the new 'not normal' that we're in right now," said Doug Heye, a former House Republican leadership aide.

President Trump has often surrounded himself with lawyers whom he sees as being good on television. But Pat Cipollone, the attorney who will play a leading role in Trump's Senate impeachment trial defense, is better known for working behind the scenes.

Updated at 12:03 p.m. ET Thursday

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she plans to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate once she has more information about the contours of a Senate trial.

"We would like to see a fair process and we will be ready for whatever it is," Pelosi said Thursday, making it clear it was a matter of time.

Updated at 9:27 p.m. ET

House lawmakers voted to impeach President Trump on Wednesday in only the third such rebuke in American history.

The move triggers a trial for Trump in the Senate, expected in January — one in which majority Republicans are likely to permit him to retain his office.

The vote was 230 to 197 on the first of two articles of impeachment — abuse of power — with one member voting present. The House then passed the second article — obstruction of Congress — with a vote of 229 to 198, with one member voting present.

House.gov

The House of Representatives is debating impeachment articles against President Trump before an expected vote early this evening. 

NHPR is airing special coverage of the House session. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

People in New Hampshire and hundreds of communities around the country held rallies Tuesday night in support of the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

The House of Representatives is expected to approve articles of impeachment Wednesday. The Senate would then act as jurors for a trial.

Mike Mackey from Newfields stood in the snow in Portsmouth’s Market Square with a sign that read “Save Our Democracy.” He said he hopes members of Congress will successfully impeach and remove the president.

The House Judiciary Committee unveiled its report on President Trump's impeachment late Sunday, one that combines the views of majority Democrats and minority Republicans.

Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said the release of the report summarizing the cases for and against action was "customary" and followed the practices of the committee in the administrations of former Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton.

Updated at 10:01 a.m. ET

The House is poised to impeach President Trump — thus making him the third president to go down in the history books with a majority of representatives voting that he is guilty of "treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors" as set out in the Constitution.

Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

Democrats are on track to impeach the president by the end of next week. After more than 14 hours of debate Thursday, the House Judiciary Committee approved impeachment articles against President Trump on Friday morning.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The House Judiciary Committee voted along party-lines today to approve two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

Each vote was 23 to 17. The charges head now to the full U.S. House of Representatives for a vote next week.

Updated at 11:43 a.m. ET

House Democrats announced Tuesday that they will bring two articles of impeachment against President Trump: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

"President Trump has acted in a manner contrary to his trust as President and subversive of constitutional government, to the great prejudice of the cause of law and justice, and to the manifest injury of the people of the United States," the resolution reads.

House Judiciary

The House Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing today on the President Donald Trump impeachment inquiry report, as the committee moves forward with drafting articles of impeachment 

Watch the hearing live via this video stream:

U.S. House

The House Judiciary Committee holds its first hearing today in the Donald Trump impeachment inquiry, focused on constitutional grounds for impeachment.

The Judiciary Committee is tasked with drafting potential articles of impeachment against President Trump. The hearing is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. Watch the hearing live.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., has released a report that outlines the findings from public hearings and closed-door interviews conducted by impeachment investigators since late September.

After two weeks of public hearings, the House impeachment inquiry into President Trump is approaching its next stage: lawmakers are now writing a report that could lead to articles of impeachment.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., made the rounds on Sunday television programs outlining the case for impeachment without outright saying whether Trump will be the third president in United States history to be impeached.

Two witnesses testified during the last scheduled day of public impeachment hearings on Thursday. Fiona Hill, a former National Security Council official, and David Holmes, a political counselor in the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine, spoke in front of the House Intelligence Committee — wrapping up two weeks of public and closed-door testimonies to Congress about President Trump's actions in the Ukraine affair. Click the audio link to listen to a special broadcast of NPR hosts and reporters offering analysis on the significant moments of the day.

House

Hearings into articles of impeachment against President Trump are continuing with the House Judiciary Committee following up on work completed by the Intelligence Committee. The full House is debating and voting on the articles on Dec. 18. NHPR will have special on-air coverage throughout. 

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