Mary McIntyre

Morning Edition Producer

Ways to Connect

Rick Ganley / NHPR

Like many other New Hampshire communities, the city of Franklin has tried for decades to recover from a lost mill economy resulting in an aging population, struggling schools, and a downtown with lots of vacant storefronts.

The state’s smallest and one of its poorest cities has ambitious plans for growth, making it an appealing backdrop for candidates in the 2020 presidential primary race. 

But how well are these candidates, who are promising to restore the nation, addressing the issues that matter most to Franklin?

NHPR File Photo

All Manchester Police officers will be wearing body cameras by the end of December. The department is hoping the new technology will improve transparency and public trust.

Officers will be able to record both audio and video when interacting with civilians.

Chief Carlo Capano says the cameras will help with looking into complaints against his department.

Via Concord High School website

The Concord School District has new policies and procedures for student safety. This follows criticism from parents and advocates about how the district handled allegations of sexual misconduct against a former teacher.

Special education teacher Howie “Primo” Leung was arrested in April on charges of sexual assault and faces a trial next year.

NHPR File Photo

The New Hampshire Attorney General's Office has released new protocols for how police departments should handle hate crimes.

The aim is to help law enforcement better identify and report hate crimes and civil rights violations in New Hampshire.

Bias incidents and hate crimes are underreported nationwide each year. According to a press release from the Attorney General's office, 48 departments in the state did not submit any information to the FBI related to hate crimes in 2017.

Mark Goebel / Flickr Creative Commons

The holiday season is in full swing. And with December approaching, there's lots of ways to celebrate in the Granite State.

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley sits down with NH Magazine's managing editor Erica Thoits at the beginning of every month to chat about upcoming events. Here's what's happening in December:

Events mentioned here:

UNH

Lecturers teach at universities across the United States, and many work off of short-term contracts that can come up for renewal every one or two years.

This month, the University of New Hampshire informed five lecturers that their contracts would not be renewed for another year. This follows 17 non-renewals from the university last year.

Michele Dillon is the dean of the College of Liberal Arts at UNH. She spoke with NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley about how eliminating these positions fits into the college's overall strategy for success.

Population growth in New Hampshire has been fairly modest in the last 20 years or so, but there’s been a substantial change in who is actually living in the state.

That’s according to a recent report from the UNH Carsey School of Public Policy. Senior demographer Ken Johnson is the author of that report. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Johnson about how shifting demographics in New Hampshire could affect the state's voting population in the upcoming presidential election.

UNH Law

Law schools across the country have struggled in the last decade with declining enrollment.

In that time, the University of New Hampshire’s Franklin Pierce School of Law has seen many changes. It’s no longer a private school and it’s seen growing deficits.

The school spent more than double its operating budget last fiscal year, but university officials say these losses are an investment in the law school’s long-term success and things are starting to look up.

NHPR’s Morning Edition Rick Ganley spoke with the dean of UNH Law, Megan Carpenter.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Wikimedia Commons

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley sits down with NH Magazine's managing editor Erica Thoits at the beginning of every month to chat about upcoming events.

Listen to find out what's happening in November:

Events mentioned in the interview:

Mary McIntyre / NHPR

It’s a gloomy, rainy Sunday in downtown Portsmouth. I’m hanging out in a dark basement beneath a bookstore waiting to see a creepy Halloween music show for kids.

Dozens of children dressed in their Halloween finest crowd the room. There are princesses and superheroes. An elephant finds a seat next to a dinosaur as the show is about to begin.

(Editor's note: we highly recommend listening to this story.)

Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc

The Hampstead School District has approved a ban on guns inside its schools.

 

The policy goes into effect immediately. Only police officers will be allowed to carry guns inside school buildings or on school buses.

 

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with the Hampstead Superintendent Earl Metzler about why school officials decided to create this policy.

Parents in Concord are demanding the school district release the results of an investigation into how it handled complaints of a former high school teacher who was arrested on charges of sexually assaulting a student.

But the school board says that report can’t be made public. That’s because investigations into misconduct of public employees are exempt under New Hampshire’s public records law.

C. Hanchey via Flickr CC

Representatives from mental health organizations in New Hampshire gathered at Nashua City Hall on Monday night to teach the public about suicide prevention and awareness.

The training was part of an initiative from the city's suicide prevention task force.

Bobbie Bagley, director for the Nashua's Division of Public Health and Community Services, says the city is trying to make it easier to have conversations about mental health and suicide.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Law enforcement and civil liberties groups have been debating changes to New Hampshire’s bail system for months. Now, a group tasked with studying the issue says any changes should wait until more information is available about the actual impact of a recent round of reforms to the system.

Department of Human Health and Services

Reports of child abuse and neglect reached a record high in New Hampshire during the last fiscal year.

That's according to data released last week by the Division for Children, Youth and Families, the state's child welfare system.

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with the DCYF director Joe Ribsam about what this data mean for measuring the agency's progress and how DCYF plans to do better.

(Editor's note: below is a partial transcript from the NHPR interview that's been lightly edited for clarity.)

JOE GRATZ / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

As lawmakers and law enforcement consider potential changes to the state's bail system, New Hampshire's courts are also deciding how to interpret the existing bail reform law.

The New Hampshire Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in the case State vs. Christina A. Hill at Windham High School.

Students were invited to watch the hearing as part of the court’s “On the Road” series.

Appleswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

Police in New Hampshire are calling for more resources to support officers who are struggling with mental health issues.

U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., heard from law enforcement officials and mental health advocates during a roundtable Tuesday at the Nashua Police Department.

Many police departments across the state, Nashua and Manchester included, have peer support programs for employees struggling with mental health.

But Shaheen says we need more research and support for these kinds of efforts.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu plans to create a bipartisan group of lawmakers to review bail reform legislation.

Sununu said in a statement Friday the legislative group will find solutions to not only fix bail reform, but overhaul the system.

Law enforcement officials have called for changes to bail reform since it first went into effect over a year ago.

"Pumpkins" by JeepersMedia is licensed under CC BY 2.0

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley sits down with NH Magazine's managing editor Erica Thoits at the beginning of every month to chat about upcoming events. Here's what's happening this October:

Events mentioned here:

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The Manchester Board of Mayor and Aldermen plans to send a letter to state legislators describing how bail reform is affecting New Hampshire's largest city.

The board voted unanimously Tuesday night in favor of sending the letter.

This follows months of complaints from Manchester police about bail reform. The department says officers are having to make multiple arrests on suspects who are released on personal recognizance bail.

Police Chief Carlo Capano has been outspoken about his dissatisfaction with bail reform in public meetings and on social media.

File photo

Legislation that goes into effect Tuesday will allow cities and towns across New Hampshire to create community power programs, in which electric customers will be automatically enrolled.

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Henry Herndon from Clean Energy NH about the law and how communities can participate.

New Hampshire’s Office of the Child Advocate is launching a review of some practices used by residential youth facilities in the state.

Child Advocate Moira O’Neill is taking a look at how both private centers and the state-run Sununu Youth Center use restraint and seclusion among children in care.

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with O'Neill about what she's hoping to understand through her review.

 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Members of New Hampshire’s Democratic congressional delegation welcomed plans to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump this week.

"The American public should be concerned taht we need to take steps to protect national security and our democracy," U.S. Rep. Chris Pappas, D-NH, said. "And it's really important that we ensure that no one is above the law, including the President of the United States."

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The Univsersity of New Hampshire begins a lecture series Tuesday that will explore mass incarceration in New Hampshire and in the U.S.

Donna Perkins is an associate professor of justice studies and UNH, and Blair Rowlett is the director of the Strafford County Mental Health Court. NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Perkins and Rowlett about defining criminality.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

With New Hampshire well into the swing of the presidential primary season, a new podcast from NHPR explores how the state has kept hold of its first-in-the-nation primary status.

It's called Stranglehold, and the first episode is out now. It's called "The Guardian," and it examines the role of Secretary of State Bill Gardner, the man who's been called the "Guardian" of the New Hampshire primary for decades.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Stranglehold co-hosts Lauren Chooljian and Jack Rodolico about the new podcast, which will run right up to the 2020 presidential primary.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

City and police officials in Manchester are reporting an increase in the city's homeless population.

The organization Families in Transition - New Horizons works to provide services to homeless people in Mancehster. This includes temporary shelter or housing.

Cathy Kuhn is the vice president of research and training for Families in Transition - New Horizons. She spoke with NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley about what she's seeing as a result of the increase in homelessness in Manchester.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

This summer, NHPR has brough you stories from along Route 4 in New Hampshire. 

The roadway stretches across the state, covering many regions from the Seacoast to the Vermont border. That's a lot of road to manage.

Bill Lambert is a statewide administrator and traffic engineer for the New Hampshire Department of Transportation. He sat down with NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley to answer some listener questions about traffic and road safety along Route 4.

The Democratic National Committee has been putting pressure on the state of Iowa to make their caucus more accessible to voters.

This led Iowa officials to roll out a plan for a new virtual caucus. But the DNC confirmed last week it would reject the plan.

With changes to the Iowa caucus on the horizon, there are fears surrounding New Hampshire’s reaction, given the Granite State’s history of fiercely protecting its first-in-the-nation primary status.

Cori Princell / NHPR

Here at NHPR, we are adamant that summer is not over. But September is officially here, and Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley sat down with NH Magazine's Erica Thoits to get the run down on some of the best events for this month.

Events mentioned here:

Ryan Lessard for NHPR

Lecturers at the University of New Hampshire have been in negotiations for a new contract with the school for over two years now.

Lecturers teach undergraduate courses and advise students, but unlike tenured faculty, they have short term contracts. The UNH Lecturers Union has been raising concerns over compensation and job security as they continue to work with the school on a new contract.

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with the unions current president Molly Campbell.

 

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