Rick Ganley

Host, Morning Edition

Credit Allegra Boverman for NHPR

For many radio listeners throughout New Hampshire, Rick Ganley is the first voice they hear each weekday morning, bringing them up to speed on news developments overnight and starting their day off with the latest information. 

As host of New Hampshire Public Radio’s Morning Edition, Ganley brings a mix of the most topical local, national and international news; in-depth conversations; ideas and commentary to listeners. His reporting for NHPR spans topics including the opioid epidemic and interviews with national and local candidates for public office.

Before coming to NHPR in January 2009, Rick spent 20 years in commercial music radio, hosting and producing radio commercials at stations in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hew Hampshire. He’s also penned dozens of pieces on music, pop culture, humor and backyard building projects for The Hippo and New Hampshire Magazine.

Rick has occasionally worked with community groups and businesses throughout New England and across the country, voicing ads for radio and television.

Because he begins his day at 3 a.m., he is a firm believer in daily naps.

Contact

Morning Edition Program Page

Ways to Connect

With bars, restaurants and venues closed down indefinitely, it's harder than ever to be a working musician. But that doesn't mean New Hampshire artists aren't performing.

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Campton musician Jim Tyrrell to ask what he's doing while he can't play on stage.

You can watch Jim Tyrrell and other local New Hampshire musicians play live shows here.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/68751915@N05/6757875045/">401(k) 2012</a> / Flickr

Rent is due this week for many tenants across New Hampshire. But due to the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, many have lost their income and may not be able to make their payments.

NHPR's reporters are working around the clock to bring you the latest on this critical story. Click here to make a donation to support our newsroom. 

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

Governor Sununu has issued an emergency stay-at-home order in response to the coronavirus pandemic. The order goes into effect this evening at midnight and is scheduled to last through May 4.

Click here to sign up for email updates on the the latest coronavirus news in New Hampshire.

Wikimedia Commons

As the coronavirus continues to spread throughout New Hampshire, communities are shutting down and people are isolated as they practice social distancing.

But in Tamworth, a group of nurses is working to keep their community connected through this pandemic.

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Jo Anne Rainville, the executive director of the Tamworth Community Nurse Association, which provides free medical care and counseling to people in town.

(Editor's note: this transcript has been lightly edited for clarity.)

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As concerns over coronavirus upend daily routines around the country, in New Hampshire it’s been mostly business as usual for state and local governments.

 

That’s the case in the State House, where legislative deadlines mean lawmakers have so far kept their normal schedule in a busy time of year. On the local level, towns across the state prepare for town meetings this weekend.

CDC

State officials announced Tuesday that a fifth New Hampshire resident has tested positive for COVID-19, caused by the coronavirus.

11 others are being tested and over 200 people are being monitored for symptoms. 

With the number of coronavirus cases likely to grow in New Hampshire, NHPR's Rick Ganley spoke with Governor Chris Sununu to tell learn more about how the state is preparing.

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)

A recent documentary centers on Boston’s WBCN radio, a 40-plus year fixture on the New England airwaves.

Rock radio is fading out in many cities around the country. Last month, WAAF, a rock radio station in Massachusetts, was sold and abruptly changed its format after 50 years. It’s been more than a decade since WBCN left the air. Both stations were widely heard in New Hampshire.

Rick Ganley / NHPR

We’re just days away from the New Hampshire primary, and candidates are making their final campaign stops here in the Granite State.

For voters who still haven’t decided who they’ll support on Tuesday, this is their last chance to see the candidates in person. So with days to go, what’s on their minds? 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

State Republicans last weekend elected grassroots activist Chris Ager to represent New Hampshire on the Republican National Committee.

Ager succeeds longtime party-insider Steve Duprey, who had the endorsement of Governor Chris Sununu. Duprey decided to step down immediately, allowing Ager to attend the national convention this summer.

New Hampshire was the last state in the nation to establish Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Former state representative Harvey Keye fought for the state to attach King's name to the holiday -- a battle that lasted for decades. It ended in 1999, with Keye sharing with his fellow lawmakers about growing up in Birmingham, Alabama under segregation and Jim Crow laws.

Keye is a Korean War veteran and a civil rights activist who marched with Dr. King in Birmingham in 1963. NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley went to visit with him at his home in Nashua to hear his story.

Rick Ganley / NHPR

Like many other New Hampshire communities, the city of Franklin has tried for decades to recover from a lost mill economy resulting in an aging population, struggling schools, and a downtown with lots of vacant storefronts.

The state’s smallest and one of its poorest cities has ambitious plans for growth, making it an appealing backdrop for candidates in the 2020 presidential primary race. 

But how well are these candidates, who are promising to restore the nation, addressing the issues that matter most to Franklin?

George Goslin/Public Domain

Affordable housing isn't an issue getting a lot of attention in presidential campaign advertisements, on cable news or on the debate stage. But it is a topic with relevance to New Hampshire, a state with an incredibly tight rental market and a shortage of affordable housing options.

For the third year, Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley and Producer Emily Quirk team up for two hours packed with under-appreciated holiday tunes, requested by you! 

(Note: to download the audio files on this page, right-click on the player arrow and select "open in new tab." Then click on the three dots next to the player on display to download the .mp3 file.)

This year also features in-studio performaces by a variety of NHPR reporters and producers, including:

A tax provision designed to boost local economies across the country has been getting a lot of attention in New Hampshire recently - not for its economic impact, but over allegations of political meddling. 

Via Concord High School website

The Concord School District has new policies and procedures for student safety. This follows criticism from parents and advocates about how the district handled allegations of sexual misconduct against a former teacher.

Special education teacher Howie “Primo” Leung was arrested in April on charges of sexual assault and faces a trial next year.

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

State attorneys have been in court the past two weeks defending a new voter registration law known as Senate Bill 3. 

The trial is part of an ongoing debate about voting rights in New Hampshire. NHPR's Casey McDermott has been following the issue closely. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with McDermott about what happens next.

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)

Okay, first, can you remind us what this law is all about and what it changed to the voting registration process?

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

After at least two overdoses by teenagers in their care, the state health department canceled its contract with the organization Granite Pathways, which was running a drug treatment facility at the Sununu Youth Services Center in Manchester.  

Mark Goebel / Flickr Creative Commons

The holiday season is in full swing. And with December approaching, there's lots of ways to celebrate in the Granite State.

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley sits down with NH Magazine's managing editor Erica Thoits at the beginning of every month to chat about upcoming events. Here's what's happening in December:

Events mentioned here:

UNH

Lecturers teach at universities across the United States, and many work off of short-term contracts that can come up for renewal every one or two years.

This month, the University of New Hampshire informed five lecturers that their contracts would not be renewed for another year. This follows 17 non-renewals from the university last year.

Michele Dillon is the dean of the College of Liberal Arts at UNH. She spoke with NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley about how eliminating these positions fits into the college's overall strategy for success.

With the late entrance of former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick into the 2020 presidential race, there are now four candidates from neighboring states campaigning in New Hampshire. In addition to Patrick, that list includes Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with NHPR’s Senior Political Reporter Josh about the track record of candidates from next door in the New Hampshire primary.

Population growth in New Hampshire has been fairly modest in the last 20 years or so, but there’s been a substantial change in who is actually living in the state.

That’s according to a recent report from the UNH Carsey School of Public Policy. Senior demographer Ken Johnson is the author of that report. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Johnson about how shifting demographics in New Hampshire could affect the state's voting population in the upcoming presidential election.

UNH Law

Law schools across the country have struggled in the last decade with declining enrollment.

In that time, the University of New Hampshire’s Franklin Pierce School of Law has seen many changes. It’s no longer a private school and it’s seen growing deficits.

The school spent more than double its operating budget last fiscal year, but university officials say these losses are an investment in the law school’s long-term success and things are starting to look up.

NHPR’s Morning Edition Rick Ganley spoke with the dean of UNH Law, Megan Carpenter.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Wikimedia Commons

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley sits down with NH Magazine's managing editor Erica Thoits at the beginning of every month to chat about upcoming events.

Listen to find out what's happening in November:

Events mentioned in the interview:

Mary McIntyre / NHPR

It’s a gloomy, rainy Sunday in downtown Portsmouth. I’m hanging out in a dark basement beneath a bookstore waiting to see a creepy Halloween music show for kids.

Dozens of children dressed in their Halloween finest crowd the room. There are princesses and superheroes. An elephant finds a seat next to a dinosaur as the show is about to begin.

(Editor's note: we highly recommend listening to this story.)

Courtesy of WNYC

NHPR's new CEO Jim Schachter takes over this month, succeeding the station's former chief executive Betsy Gardella, who resigned abruptly last October. 

Schachter recently held the top news executive position at WNYC, the country's largest public media station. He also spent nearly 17 years at The New York Times, where he held the position of associate managing editor. 

Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc

The Hampstead School District has approved a ban on guns inside its schools.

 

The policy goes into effect immediately. Only police officers will be allowed to carry guns inside school buildings or on school buses.

 

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with the Hampstead Superintendent Earl Metzler about why school officials decided to create this policy.

Parents in Concord are demanding the school district release the results of an investigation into how it handled complaints of a former high school teacher who was arrested on charges of sexually assaulting a student.

But the school board says that report can’t be made public. That’s because investigations into misconduct of public employees are exempt under New Hampshire’s public records law.

Rick Ganley / NHPR

Vincent McCaffrey spent three decades selling books on Boston’s Newbury Street. His shop, Avenue Victor Hugo Books, became famous in the city. After it closed, he retailed his vast collection of used books online. 

Department of Human Health and Services

Reports of child abuse and neglect reached a record high in New Hampshire during the last fiscal year.

That's according to data released last week by the Division for Children, Youth and Families, the state's child welfare system.

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with the DCYF director Joe Ribsam about what this data mean for measuring the agency's progress and how DCYF plans to do better.

(Editor's note: below is a partial transcript from the NHPR interview that's been lightly edited for clarity.)

File photo

Legislation that goes into effect Tuesday will allow cities and towns across New Hampshire to create community power programs, in which electric customers will be automatically enrolled.

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Henry Herndon from Clean Energy NH about the law and how communities can participate.

Pages