Zoey Knox | New Hampshire Public Radio

Zoey Knox

Community Engagement Producer

Zoey Knox is NHPR's newsroom engagement producer. She has spent most of her radio years at college radio stations in Madison, WI (WSUM) and Seattle, WA (KXSU).

Prior to joining NHPR, she held a programming internship at 88Nine Radio Milwaukee.

Zoey is a proud graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she studied Communication Arts with a specialization in Radio-TV-Film.

Gabriela Lozada / NHPR

From the early days of COVID-19 to now, as vaccines start to signal a close to the pandemic, your voices have guided our coverage. We’ve answered your questions about coronavirus, vaccines and the state’s reopening, updating our information as we learn more.

We know much more about COVID-19 than we did in March 2020, but the state of the pandemic continues to change, leading to previously unanswered questions. 

Dating became particularly complicated during the pandemic. Now that it's safer to date in person, people, like Angi Francesco, are starting to get back out there — for the first time, again.

Angi Francesco, on her first date since the pandemic started: "I actually had a first date on Friday. It was funny because it's someone I've sort of known, but we've never really hung out or spent time on our own together. We tried out a new restaurant, and it was my first time in a restaurant in some 446 days.

As people across the country get vaccinated against COVID-19, more of us are beginning to plan reunions with family or friends. Gerald Cooper, of Springfield, is mapping out his route to Virginia, where there's one person he can't wait to see for the first time, again: his 5-year-old granddaughter, Juniper.

During the coronavirus pandemic, many of us have turned to art to help us get through these hard times. As part of a spring series focused on how artists found community and inspiration during the pandemic, we asked our audience to share their creative pursuits.

Voices of New Hampshire is a new project designed to connect you with us - and with each other – by bringing more audience voices to our airwaves.

For this project, we're collecting audio recordings of people from across the state, and incorporating them into our daily broadcast through short audio clips played at different times throughout the day on NHPR.

Credit: Reina Adriano

To mark the one-year anniversary of the first COVID-19 death in New Hampshire, NHPR is gathering stories and photos of people who passed away due to the pandemic to put in perspective the losses we've faced over the past year.

We asked our audience to share memories of loved ones who died from the virus, and to tell us what role they played in their community, how they impacted those around them, and what made them special.

Dan Tuohy, NHPR

Towns and school districts across the state are preparing for this year’s Town Meeting Day, March 9. Some NHPR listeners have reached out to ask how towns will balance the need to gather for local elections with precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19. 

We looked into those issues, and here’s what we learned.

COURTESY BLACK LIVES MATTER SEACOAST

Black Lives Matter Seacoast held a virtual gathering Sunday night honoring area leaders who are people of color. It’s the first event like it for the group. 

Julian Maduro, Events Manager for BLM Seacoast, said that other events celebrating local leaders, such as Catapult Seacoast’s 10 to Watch Awards, have left out BIPOC leaders who do important work in their communities. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

It’s been about a year since the coronavirus first arrived in New Hampshire, and the country has reached the sad milestone of 500,000 lives lost to the virus. NHPR is gathering photos and stories of people we've lost to the pandemic.

President Joe Biden
White House video capture

Today’s Inauguration Day was historic in more ways than one. President Biden is the oldest president to take the oath of office, and Vice President Harris is the first woman, first Black person and first person of South Asian descent to serve as Vice President.

COURTESY LAURIE MCGOWAN

2020 has been a more eventful year than any of us could have imagined. And it can be hard to even remember all of the events that took place in the news in light of all of the changes we made in our lives: vacations cancelled, schools closed, jobs lost, holidays spent without family.

As part of NHPR’s year-end series, Hindsight, we asked our audience to tell us how their lives have changed due to COVID-19, what they learned, and what their silver linings have been during what has been a tough year for so many of us. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Throughout this school year, NHPR’s COVID & The Classroom reporting initiative has asked students, teachers and parents to share their stories of what education looks like during the pandemic.

Although many New Hampshire schools are currently in hybrid or remote status, many are still moving forward with winter sports.  COVID-19 transmission in school buildings has remained relatively low, but high-contact sports have raised some safety concerns.

There are strong feelings about this. Many school boards are in favor of continuing sports — while school administrators have pushed back.

As schools debate the issue, we asked our audience,  “Can winter sports be safe during the pandemic, and are they worth the risk?”

Marie Sapienza via NH Coastal Adaptation Workgroup

NHPR’s new climate change reporting project, By Degrees, begins in the midst of a global pandemic, mass protests against systemic racism, a presidential transition and an economic crisis. 

The incoming Biden administration has promised to combat climate change, while New Hampshire lags behind its neighbors on similar legislation. In many ways, climate change has taken a backseat as governments deal with the social and economic costs of the coronavirus.

We need your help to tell new stories about how Granite Staters are experiencing climate change at this historic moment. How has climate change affected your life, and how have you responded? In what ways are you observing climate change in New Hampshire? What questions do you have?