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11.16.15: Separating Comedy From the Comedian, Music After 40, & Sojoy

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Hoffnungsschimmer via Flickr CC
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Four more women just joined the federal defamation suit being brought against Bill Cosby. Even as fans and colleagues and celebrities distance themselves from the once beloved Cosby, there's still the question of how to handle his comedic legacy. Today, can you separate an artist's work from their deeds? Plus, when was the last time you really got into a new album or musician? If you're an adult, it's probably been a while. We're speaking with a life-long music lover about how to keep growing your musical tastes. 

Listen to the full show. 

Can Cosby Be Separated From His Comedy?

In the face of mounting accusations against him, many comics who were deeply influenced by Bill Cosby are now grappling with how to handle his tarnished reputation. Greg Fitzsimmons is a stand-up comic, host of the podcast Fitzdog Radio, and an Emmy award winning comedy writer is choosing a different route, one that he believes will hit Cosby where it hurts – his material.

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Can Cosby Be Separated From His Comedy?

The Ghost of an Idea

In 1873 the Comstock Law was passed which outlawed “obscene, lude, or lascivious materials” being passed through the postal system. It was named after Anthony Comstock, a moral reformer who was then put in charge of enforcing the law – making him one of America’s most powerful censors. BackStory producer Nina Earnest brings us the story of one of Comstock’s most eccentric targets. 

You can listen to this story again at PRX.org

Music After 40

A new online study has confirmed a sad truth about our listening habits: that people over age 33 effectively stop discovering new music, and are fairly doomed to recycle the hits of their youth.

Gabe Meline rejects the notion that age prevents us from trying on new music. He’s music editor at KQED Arts in California, where he recently wrote an essay called “Keep Listening: Notes on Turning 40 and Still Seeking Out New Music.”

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Music After 40

Sojoy

Sojoy is a Seacoast based jazz ensemble lead by drummer and composer Jonny Peiffer. The 7-piece band is holding a release party for their exuberant first album on Friday, November 20th at The Dance Hall in Kittery, Maine. 

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Sojoy

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