protest | New Hampshire Public Radio

protest

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

A small group of young activists protested this weekend outside the Amazon distribution hub in Hooksett, calling for the company’s workers to get time off to vote Tuesday for the election.

It was part of similar protests taking place nationwide. Students who organized the Hooksett event have also worked with groups like 350NH and the New Hampshire Youth Movement.

Lesley University sophomore Alison Frisella spoke through a megaphone in front of a protest banner, as Amazon delivery drivers rolled past nearby big box stores. A few honked in support.

Sean Hurley

The Plymouth Selectboard will host a town-wide zoom hearing Monday evening on a proposed ordinance mandating face coverings in town. Over the weekend, on the town common, an anti-mask mandate protest was held. NHPR’s Sean Hurley was there. 

Update: Plymouth's Select Board voted for the mask mandate on August 10. Click here for that story.

Reverend Don Ruggles, courtesy Chisasibi Heritage & Cultural Centre.

On July 6, a federal judge ordered the shutdown of the Dakota Access Pipeline -- a victory for the resistance movement led by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

But pull on the thread of this moment and you'll find it’s connected to a long and complicated history, of treaties made, kept, and violated, as well as the Supreme Court decisions that constitute so-called “native law."

350 New Hampshire Action

More than 20 protesters were arrested Sunday trying to block a train from delivering coal to Merrimack Station power plant in Bow.

The climate activists who organized the blockades also marched on the plant at a demonstration in September, when dozens more were arrested.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Nearly 70 people were arrested during a protest at a coal-fired power plant in Bow Saturday.

The activists had marched onto the grounds of Merrimack Station, the largest coal-burning facility left in New England that is not set to retire.

Hundreds more people from across the region protested outside the plant’s main gate and in nearby Memorial Field, decrying the continued use of the fossil fuels that accelerate the harmful effects of climate change.


Peter Biello / NHPR

Samuel Alicea is a wide receiver on the Tilton School football team. He's seventeen years old. He's black. And he's a protester. About a year ago, when he was a student at Merrimack Valley High School, he knelt in protest during the national anthem, following the lead of Colin Kaepernick, who knelt in support of the Black Lives Matter movement.

The response was swift and ugly. Alicea left Merrimack Valley for Tilton School, where his family says he's safer. He spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about what the year since his controversial protest has been like for him. 

Lauren Chooljian for NHPR

Evan Bennett has wanted to be in a pig scramble since he was four years old. And now that he’s nine, it feels like he’s been waiting pretty much forever.

He’s watched two of his older brothers get in a pen at the Deerfield Fair, chasing piglets in front of big crowds, trying to shove them into burlap sacks.

This year, Evan finally got his chance. But while he and five other kids scrambled after black, spotted piglets, protesters from around New England greeted fair visitors with signs that called the event “torture” and “animal abuse.”

The Women's March on Washington

Jan 19, 2017
Flickr

The day after Donald Trump's inauguration, hundreds of thousands of women are expected to protest in the Capitol and in cities around the country, including New Hampshire.  But about forty percent of female voters chose Trump, and so more widespread unity may be an elusive cause. 


What Protest Songs Sound Like in 2016

Jan 12, 2016
Nicholas Balanon via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/rCWAPk

Nina Simone, along with Sam Cooke, Bob Dylan, Pete Seeger and countless others made important contributions to the rich canon of protest songs during the civil rights movement. A canon so strong, that the term "protest song" often conjures images of artists from the 1960s.

Natasha Haverty

Last night Presidential Candidate Donald Trump came to Portsmouth for a few minutes, to pick up an endorsement from the New England’s police union. 

Sean Hurley

There's a long history of people chaining themselves to trees or posts or buildings - or to each other - to protest some injustice or simply to get their voices heard.  But here in New Hampshire we may have a first. Last week, Kevin Dumont, the owner of Liquid Planet Water Park in Candia, climbed to the top of his water slide tower and chained himself to the rail.  His goal? To save the park from a planned December 2nd auction.  NHPR's Sean Hurley spent the night with Dumont at the top of the tower and sends us this story.

Courtesy VPR

About 35 students staged a sit-in in Dartmouth President Philip Hanlon’s office Tuesday. They have been pressuring the College to increase enrollment of black, Latino and Native American students to at least 10 percent each, and to hire more faculty from minority groups. The 70 monetary demands outlined in their “Freedom Budget”  also include sweeping changes in the curriculum, financial aid, and residential life programs.

The Bitter Taste of the Rainbow

Apr 2, 2012
(Photo by p4nc0np4n via Flickr Creative Commons)

Successful brands can cost millions of dollars to create, protect, and control. Despite those mammoth efforts, name brands can take on a life of their own. Take Skittles, the brand of candy Trayvon Martin bought shortly before being shot by George Zimmerman. Now, the candy is being used at protests and getting big play in the media, translating to a brand boost of sorts.

Occupy New Hampshire Hits Peterborough

Nov 17, 2011
Donna Moxley / NHPR

People from across southwestern New Hampshire gathered at a park in Peterborough Thursday to rally for the job creation and improvement to the state’s roads and bridges.

As part of a national protest, more than 100 New Hampshire residents turned out in Peterborough to declare an “economic emergency” for the ninety nine percent.

They focused on the country’s decaying transportation infrastructure and high unemployment rate, Peterborough resident Joe Graley urged Congress to pass President Obama’s jobs plan