Sam Evans-Brown | New Hampshire Public Radio

Sam Evans-Brown

Host, Outside/In

 

Sam Evans-Brown has been working for New Hampshire Public Radio since 2010, when he began as a freelancer. He shifted gears in 2016 and began producing Outside/In, a podcast and radio show about “the natural world and how we use it.” His work has won him several awards, including two regional Edward R. Murrow awards, one national Murrow, and the Overseas Press Club of America's award for best environmental reporting in any medium. He studied Politics and Spanish at Bates College, and before reporting was variously employed as a Spanish teacher, farmer, bicycle mechanic, ski coach, research assistant, a wilderness trip leader and a technical supporter.

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Flickr Creative Commons | Jan Kaláb

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

This week, he's tackling a gritty one from a listener named Laura from Stratham:

Ewen Roberts, Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/cXwod9

State Agriculture Officials are warning New Hampshire residents not to plant packets of seeds that may arrive in the mail, unrequested, and with return addresses in China.

People across the world have begun to receive small packages of all sorts, as part of an e-commerce scam known as "brushing." Sellers create fake orders in order to boost their rating on websites like Amazon, which moves their products closer to the top of search results.

https://flic.kr/p/5Dr6fa / Flicker CC

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Flickr Creative Commons | DaPuglet

  Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Sherry From Meredith asks: “I’m noticing a lot of chipmunks this year, as my son Josiah put it. Are we having a Chip-ocalypse? Like we had Squirrel-mageddon a couple of years ago?”

 

Wikimedia Commons

  Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In Host Sam Evans-Brown answers listeners' questions about the mysteries and quirks of the outside world.

Christina Phillips/NHPR

Hoy, viernes 19 de junio, te contamos: 

Se reportaron 17 nuevos casos de COVID-19 el jueves, la cifra más baja de casos en un día que se ha presentado desde Marzo. 

Grupos locales que defienden la inmigración apoyan la decisión de la Corte Suprema de bloquear el intento del presidente Trump de acabar con el programa DACA. 

Haz click para escuchar estas y otras noticias. 

Hoy, jueves 18 de junio, te contamos: 

Mañana, viernes 19 de junio, es la celebración de Juneteenth en Manchester con arte, música, poesía y pruebas de COVID-19.

Las visitas al aire libre en centros de salud para la tercera edad ya están permitidas pero algunos centros no podrán hacerlo debido a los brotes activos de COVID-19. 

El departamento de servicios ambientales de NH ha recibido más aplicaciones de reemplazo de sistemas sépticos este año. Familias que se quedan más tiempo en casa y productos de limpieza podrían ser los responsables.  

Josh Rogers / NHPR

Hoy, miércoles 17 de junio, te contamos: 

Hay 27 nuevos casos de COVID-19 y seis nuevos fallecimientos en NH. Funcionarios dijeron que los números están disminuyendo pero se recomienda seguir tomando precauciones.

El proyecto de ley que prohíbe el uso de llaves de estrangulamiento por la policía de NH fue aprobado por el senado en su reunión ayer en Concord. 

Haz click para escuchar estas y otras noticias. 

Si estás interesado en realizarte una prueba de COVID-19: 

Flickr Creative Commons | Nicholas A. Tonelli

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In Host Sam Evans-Brown answers listeners' questions about the mysteries and quirks of the outside world.

Laurie from California asks: “In all of the five big extinction events, how did plants fare versus animals? Are trees going to take over after we’re gone? Are trees with flowers still going to be around?”

Flickr Creative Commons | Brian Gratwicke

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Susanne from Rumney asks: "I’ve been going for a walk every morning since we’ve been quarantined. So, I’ve noticed lately that I’ve heard a lot of woodpeckers in the morning and I haven’t noticed them before. And I wondered if there are more of them or if this is the time of year that they are seeking wood from the trees?"

 

Flickr Creative Commons | USFWS Mountain-Prairie

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Cindy from Chichester asks: "Every year I have a skunk that comes around and makes divots all over my yard looking for grubs. The question is this: Do they actually know that there is a grub in the place that they dig, or do they just randomly dig holes until they find something? I have not been able to get an answer to this question, so it’s your turn." 

Challenge accepted, Cindy.

Pexels

From seismology to the lives of lab animals, coronavirus is changing science in a variety of ways.

Wikimedia Commons

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Claudia Asks: “What is the difference between a turtle and a tortoise? Which do we have in New Hampshire? Could you give some examples of each please?”

This is one of the classic turtle questions, and as such we’re going to knock it out of the park quickly and pivot to some #turtlefacts.

Sara Plourde | NHPR

If you’re interested in more information about how to get outside during the COVID-19 Pandemic, check out the latest episode of Outside/In, or the episode of the Exchange from earlier this week.

New Hampshire residents could be forgiven for being slightly confused about whether they’re allowed to go for a hike or not. 

Flickr Creative Commons | C Watts

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Sara in New Orleans asks: “I’m calling because every time I think I’m very good at recognizing shore birds, I get mixed up by the fact that some of their bills change color during the different seasons, and I’m just so confused by how this happens and how long it takes for it to happen.”

Flickr Creative Commons | Rod Haley

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Right now, many New Hampshirites are home, giving us a unique opportunity to question the nature invading our personal spaces.

Click here for all of NHPR's coronavirus coverage, including the latest news, FAQs, and more.

Flickr Creative Commons | William A. LaCrosse III

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Gary from Randolph asks: "I was curious as to whether Lyme disease affects wildlife. Do fox, moose, bear and other critters suffer from Lyme disease?"

You may have heard that dogs can get Lyme disease. You may have also heard that cats don’t. What gives? 

Wikimedia Commons

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Clair from Plymouth asks: “Why do cows have four teats and just about every other animal that doesn’t have litter has two?

This has been a topic of scientific inquiry going back all the way to Aristotle who first posited the idea that in mammals, the number of teats is — as a rule — double the number of offspring in the average litter.

  Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Sarah from South Carolina Asks: “My husband and I were discussing the very interesting topic of dog toots. So we were curious as to whether or not all animals can pass gas?”

This is how it ends. We all start out doing important journalism — holding the powerful to account — but you keep at it long enough and it all devolves into flatulence. 

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Bob From Deerfield Asks: This might be a dead end, silly question, but: are there any animals besides humans that enjoy music, and if so what genre do they prefer?

*Gasp* There are no dead end silly questions on Ask Sam! Perish the thought!

Flickr Creative Commons | Bryce Bradford

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Ruth from Sandwich asks: “I just was skating on beautiful Squam Lake with black ice, and we could look down and see some other stuff. I was wondering if you could talk about ice forms, why there’s cracks, why there’s little ridges, why there’s bubbles… all that stuff.”

Flickr Creative Commons | Denis Fournier

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Flickr Creative Commons | Charlie Stinchcomb

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Myles from Alaska asks: When we go underwater, everything looks kind of weird and marbly. When whales are out of the water, what does it look like for them? Does it look weird because they’re not used to being in the air?

Mount Washington Auto Road

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

 

David from Denver, Colorado asks: I studied geology ... and we learned extensively about the long and complex geological of the New England region. And I can’t help but wonder what was the maximum elevation achieved in New Hampshire and New England generally?

Note: This edition of Ask Sam originally aired in November, 2018.

Katmai National Park and Preserve

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Jahleah asks: I have two questions for you. Number one: How do bears hibernate in New Hampshire? Number two: do they even need to hibernate since there’s trash everywhere?

Flickr Creative Commons | Tracey

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Panther from New Hampshire asks: "I was wondering if milkweed was related to cotton, and if it’s ever been used for material like clothing?"

First of all, I’m not sure if Panther is a nom de plume, nom de guerre or just a regular old nom, but what a name, sir!

Photo by Jonathan Combe, https://bit.ly/2BhLrRu

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. This week, we're buzzing because...

...Patty from Northampton asks: "I should understand the tides but I really don't. So in North Hampton, we have a very small beach even at low tide. And I was recently at Ogunquit beach with a friend, and the tide goes the way the heck out at low tide. And I don't know why!"

BRICKY CEMENT / FLICKR/CC

The Outside/In team demystifies cap-and-trade programs in the Northeast.

Erika Janik

News you can use: how to buy clothes that last. 

Flickr Creative Commons | Ian Jacobs

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. This week, we're buzzing, because...

...Carolyn from Maine asks: “This summer there’s been a lot of attention paid to diseases like EEE, which can be transmitted from a bite from an infected mosquito. But my question is, during the middle of the day when these species of mosquito are less likely to be feeding, what are they doing instead? Which made me wonder if mosquitoes sleep?”

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