Justine Paradis | New Hampshire Public Radio

Justine Paradis

Producer/Reporter

Justine Paradis is a producer and reporter for NHPR's Creative Production Unit, most oftenOutside/In. Before NHPR, she produced Millennial podcast from Radiotopia, contributed to podcasts including Love + Radio, and reported for WCAI & WGBH from her hometown of Nantucket island.

Before making radio, she ran a mobile wood-fired pizza oven, tended gardens, and sailed the ocean blue. 

Ways to Connect

Sara Plourde | NHPR

If you’re interested in more information about how to get outside during the COVID-19 Pandemic, check out the latest episode of Outside/In, or the episode of the Exchange from earlier this week.

New Hampshire residents could be forgiven for being slightly confused about whether they’re allowed to go for a hike or not. 

As the numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases rise in New Hampshire, we've heard from a lot of listeners.

As a station, we've tried our best to keep pace with the breaking news of the virus, including a live coronavirus blog, a story on finding connection while social distancing, and reporting on how schools are responding to the outbreak.

Justine Paradis

When Courtney Marshall asked us why it’s so hard for black women to find a decent haircut in New Hampshire, we invited her to join us to find the answer. The resulting story won a regional Edward R. Murrow award.

Two years later, we’re revisiting Courtney’s question to see if anything has changed, both for her and in the state.

Allegra Boverman | NHPR

Thousands of people went to the polls yesterday to vote in New Hampshire's first in the nation primary.

Charles Cooper wasn't one of them.

In the past few months, many of the candidates running for the Democratic presidential nomination  have passed through the studios of New Hampshire Public Radio, on the top floor of an office building in Concord.

On their way to the elevator, they had to pass by the Pillsbury Cafe and Pantry, owned by Cooper and his wife Jill.

Selling witchcraft is a business where historical tragedy, the spectacle of Halloween, and modern magic all coexist. And nowhere is that more true than in Salem, Massachusetts.

This is the third and final installment of the Real Witches of New Hampshire, a collaboration between NHPR and New Hampshire Humanities on the Second Greatest Show on Earth.

Justine Paradis

In fewer than three hundred years, New England moved on from witch trials and executions and became a place where people openly call themselves witches.

But there are many ways to practice modern magic.

This is the second episode of The Real Witches of New Hampshire, a collaboration with New Hampshire Humanities.

Sara Plourde

Decades before the Salem witch trials, two women were accused of witchcraft in New Hampshire. Jane Walford and Eunice Cole stood trial in the same year, within just a few miles of each other, but their lives ended quite differently. The fates of these women might provide insight into what a historical witch actually was, and why some survived their trials while others did not. 

 

This is first episode of "The Real Witches of New Hampshire," a three-part series and collaboration between New Hampshire Public Radio and New Hampshire Humanities.

Tiny Stories From The North Country

Aug 1, 2019

 

During our reporting, some conversations don't make the final cut because they don't quite fit the subject at hand – but it's often the meandering moment and quiet stories that bring a place to life. Here's a few too good not to share: we're calling them "Tiny Stories from the North Country."

Justine Paradis

Is the North Country ready, willing, and able to shift from a timber-based economy to a tourism-based economy?

NYPL

Here begins the story of a flower, a tale of identity, pride, and hubris.  

Justine Paradis

Word of Mouth explores New Hampshire through deep-dive series reported around a central theme.

Our next theme: the North Country, or the Great North Woods. Here's your chance to shape our reporting.

Justine Paradis

Three years ago, Samuel and Rachel purchased a wooden crate manufactured by inmates at the New Hampshire State Prison, but they wondered: was it ethically made? 

This is the third episode in our four-part series on mass incarceration in New Hampshire. Explore the full series here. 

History of Concord, New Hampshire, from the original grant in seventeen hundred and twenty-five to the opening of the twentieth century

What does mass incarceration look like in New Hampshire?

Kim Cummings

Sometimes, the clothes hanging in the closet hold dreams about who we could become.

Yes to the Dress

Jan 18, 2019

Five people invite us to take a peek into their closets and tell us what's inside.

Getty Images | NPR

New Hampshire’s minimum wage is the lowest in New England. It's the same as the federal rate: $7.25 an hour. Meanwhile, Maine sets its minimum wage at $10; Vermont, at $10.50; and Massachusetts, $11, is on the way up to $15.

For the latest in NHPR's Only in New Hampshire series, listener and lifelong Manchester resident Kathy Staub asked:

New Hampshire is surrounded by states with a minimum wage of $10 or more. How do higher wage commuters impact rents along the border?

NASA

Although surrounded by states with minimum wages of over $10 an hour, New Hampshire holds to the federal minimum wage at $7.25 an hour, the lowest in New England. 

If you're making close to the minimum wage in New Hampshire, can you make rent?


via Facebook

Like many a millennial hired at the dawn of the era of social media, Zachary Byam found himself in charge of creating a Facebook page at his college job.

But his task was unique. Byam worked as a part-time police officer, and he was creating his department's first social media account.

Marlborough Police Department

When cops go online, sometimes they make jokes. 

Franconia Lives

Sep 28, 2018
(C) CHESTER LUDLOW, 1972

Once, a utopian experiment burned bright and brief in the Great North Woods.

Jess O'Hare loved living in New Hampshire. She moved to Concord for a job as an environmental organizer just after her college graduation and enjoyed the affordability, tight-knit community, and natural landscapes.

"Life in New Hampshire was mountain-biking, swimming, skiing, sometimes even before work. You'd just get it all in," she said. "And it was easy to do that."

But there was just this one thing. 

Justine Paradis

In a world dominated by human noise and industry, true quiet is hard to find. That is to our detriment, according to sound ecologist Bernie Krause. A musician and sound designer, Krause lives in northern California.

Krause is known for his work in soundscape ecology: the study of acoustic relationships within an ecosystem.

Justine Paradis

Do you ever wonder about the sounds we hear every day, by choice or by circumstance? How does the sound of our daily environments affect our lives and minds? One man seeks the quietest place in the White Mountains and we explore the art of the soundscape.  

Why is it so difficult for a woman of color to find a good haircut in New Hampshire?

Courtney Marshall returns to the show with a problem: where can she get her hair done? We investigate the hair scene for people of color in the Granite State. Plus, spoils from the annual Gilsum Rock Swap.

Why is it so difficult for a woman of color to find a good haircut in New Hampshire?

Courtney Marshall returns to the show with a problem: where can she get her hair done? "Right now in New Hampshire I'm trying to find another hairdresser. I'm in a state of emergency. I do not want to have to cross state lines to get a haircut."

 

 

 While there are a few options in Manchester, depending on the time of day, that could be a 45-minute drive from Courtney's home in Exeter. She is looking for a consistent, convenient option.

Courtney Marshall

 

Courtney Marshall's Sunday Zumba class is standing-room only. Once a week, a group of all ages laugh, cheer, and dance together. 

This group brings style and goofy t-shirts to their workouts. They call it "Sunday Funday".

"You saw me get up and do a dance. I would never do that in any class that I take I would never do that," said Donna Garofono, a regular participant.

Justine Paradis

What if the gym were a joyful place?

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Courtesy Mark Baer

Before Nintendo 64, before Playstation, before Wii or Dreamcast or Xbox... there was the Magnavox Odyssey.

Eric Masterson

What exactly is going on with the design of New Hampshire's state flag... and why is it so very unsatisfying? We investigate.
 

Plus, we chase the spring bird migration and examine the legend of the casserole.

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