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Politics
Final results: Summary results | Town resultsThe BasicsThe New Hampshire primary is a mainstay in American electoral politics. Every four years, voters gather to help determine the Republican and/or Democratic nominee for President. While the state only has 12 electoral votes in 2012 (normally it’s 24, but the Republican National Committee penalized the state party for moving up the event date), the primary’s position as one of the earliest contests gives the state out-sized influence over the nomination process.Only the Iowa caucuses come before New Hampshire’s primary. Traditionally, New Hampshire’s broad-based primary contest has been seen as a counter-weight to Iowa’s more drawn-out caucus process, which tends to draw a smaller core of party faithful. In the case of the 2012 Republican race, New Hampshire’s electorate is seen to represent the more libertarian-leaning, fiscally conservative wing of the party, while Iowa voters are seen as representing the socially conservative wing of the GOP base.N.H. Primary summary provided by StateImpact - NH reporter, Amanda Loder

Perry Unveils His 'Cut, Balance And Grow Plan'

<p>Texas Gov. Rick Perry at last week's Republican presidential debate in Las Vegas.</p>
<p>Texas Gov. Rick Perry at last week's Republican presidential debate in Las Vegas.</p>

Saying that it "reorders the way they do business in Washington by reinventing the tax code and restoring our nation to fiscal health through balanced budgets and entitlement reform," Texas Gov. Rick Perry is this hour unveiling his "cut, balance and grow plan" on taxes.

In a speech he's giving in Greenville, S.C., (prepared text here), the Republican presidential contender is saying that "central to my plan is giving every American the option of throwing out the three million words of the current tax code, and the costs of complying with that code, in order to pay a 20 percent flat tax on their income."

Also this morning, during an interview aired on MSNBC's Morning Joe, Perry again flirted with the so-called birther issue (as he did earlier with Parade magazine), saying: "that's all a distraction, I get it. I'm really not worried about the president's birth certificate. [But] it's fun to poke at him a little bit and say 'hey, how about let's see your grades and your birth certificate?' "

Our colleague Frank James follows the ups and downs of the presidential campaign over at It's All Politics.

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