WebHeader_Grove.png
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Get entered to win tickets to Paul McCartney at Fenway June 8th with your gift today!
North Country
Final results: Summary results | Town resultsThe BasicsThe New Hampshire primary is a mainstay in American electoral politics. Every four years, voters gather to help determine the Republican and/or Democratic nominee for President. While the state only has 12 electoral votes in 2012 (normally it’s 24, but the Republican National Committee penalized the state party for moving up the event date), the primary’s position as one of the earliest contests gives the state out-sized influence over the nomination process.Only the Iowa caucuses come before New Hampshire’s primary. Traditionally, New Hampshire’s broad-based primary contest has been seen as a counter-weight to Iowa’s more drawn-out caucus process, which tends to draw a smaller core of party faithful. In the case of the 2012 Republican race, New Hampshire’s electorate is seen to represent the more libertarian-leaning, fiscally conservative wing of the party, while Iowa voters are seen as representing the socially conservative wing of the GOP base.N.H. Primary summary provided by StateImpact - NH reporter, Amanda Loder

Cilley's North Country Roots Not Enough

cilley walking out door.jpg
Chris Jensen for NHPR
/

If Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jackie Cilley thought being a Berlin native would give her a crucial edge in the North Country she was wrong.

Cilley did win in Berlin but her 546 votes were only 56 percent of the total.

Down the road in neighboring Gorham she snared 55 percent of the votes.

But it was downhill from there despite spending five consecutive days touring the North Country from Littleton to Colebrook and Pittsburg and then over to Berlin and the communities along the Androscoggin River.

In Littleton she got only 35 percent of the vote.

In Colebrook she got 39 percent.

In Lancaster she got 39 percent.

In Errol she got 54 percent. Unfortunately that was only 19 votes.

The situation was similar in Bath. Getting 69 percent of the votes sounds pretty good but it only added 38 votes to her tally.

In all it simply wasn’t nearly enough to beat Maggie Hassan.

With 261 of the 301 precincts reporting by just after midnight Hassan had just over 40,000 votes compared to Cilley’s 28,000.

Early in the evening Cilley conceded.

You make NHPR possible.

NHPR is nonprofit and independent. We rely on readers like you to support the local, national, and international coverage on this website. Your support makes this news available to everyone.

Give today. A monthly donation of $5 makes a real difference.