WebHeader_Grove.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
5 new or upgrading sustainers will unlock $5K for NHPR. Make your sustaining gift today!
The Exchange
0000017a-15d9-d736-a57f-17ff8a390002"A national treasure in our backyard"It spans more than 13,000 acres. Nearly a quarter of the state’s population lives within its watershed. In a 2010 series, Amy Quinton looked at the trouble pollution poses to the health of this critical estuary, and some proposed solutions for returning the Seacoast’s Great Bay to health.Now, NHPR's Environment Reporter Sam Evans-Brown brings you continuing coverage of the efforts being made in the Great Bay.Coverage supported by Penn State Public Media.Great Bay Watershed Map | More Great Bay Images

New Hampshire's Hidden Coast: The Health Of Our Estuaries

greatbayreserve1.jpg
Great Bay National Estuarine Reserve
/

An estuary is where freshwater rivers meet the ocean, making up a fragile yet vital eco-system for wildlife, fish, and people.  Now a new report on the Great Bay and Hampton-Seabrook Estuaries shows continuing trouble for this region, and introduces comprehensive strategies for keeping the area healthy. 

GUESTS:

  • Ted Diers - Administrator for the Watershed Management Bureau at the N.H. Department of Environmental Services. 
  • Jennifer Perry - Public Works Director for Exeter.
  • Cory Riley - Reserve manager at the Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve.
  • Rachel Rouillard - Executive Director for PREP (Piscataqua Region Estuarine Partnership), which works to protect and preserve state estuaries including the Great Bay Estuary and the Hampton-Seabrook Estuary. 
Related Content