Todd Bookman | New Hampshire Public Radio

Todd Bookman

Reporter

Todd started at NHPR in 2009 as an intern, and in 2011, took over the health beat. He spent two years at WHYY in Philadelphia covering health and science, before returning to NHPR in 2016 as a general assignment reporter with a focus on business and economics. He holds a master’s degree in public administration from Columbia University.

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A Merrimack Superior Court judge is declining to dismiss a lawsuit filed by two Georgia-based health care entities alleging religious discrimination by state regulators. 

TONY WEBSTER, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Rural hospitals, a software vendor and a demolition contractor in Salem were among the largest New Hampshire recipients of Paycheck Protection Program loans from the federal government, according to new data released Monday by the Small Business Administration.

Image included in federal court filing

SIG Sauer is facing another lawsuit over allegations its popular P320 pistol fired without a trigger pull, causing serious injuries to a New Hampshire man.

Getty Images

Ghislaine Maxwell, a longtime associate of billionaire Jeffrey Epstein, was arrested in Bradford, New Hampshire Thursday morning on charges that she helped procure and groom underage girls for the well-connected financier.

In 2019, Epstein was found dead in a jail cell in New York while awaiting trial on sexual abuse charges.  

Michael, via Flickr

For the first time in New Hampshire history, gamblers will be able to legally wager on a competitive eating contest this weekend.

DraftKings, which was selected by the state last year to operate both online and in-person sports wagering, will take bets on the annual Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating contest.

Considered by some to be the Superbowl of competitive eating, the annual July 4th competition pits some of the world’s finest appetites against each other in a contest to consume the most hot dogs in ten minutes. 

Todd Bookman, NHPR

In early May, as New Hampshire officials began to lift restrictions on some corners of the economy, Gov. Chris Sununu announced that the state would distribute its stockpile of disposable masks to businesses and nonprofits for free.

Now, thanks to newly provided public records, we can see where those masks ended up — and which businesses were the biggest beneficiaries.

Sarah Gibson/NHPR

Activists from local Black Lives Matter chapters and other social justice groups from across the state gathered outside the New Hampshire State House on Saturday, calling for an end to systemic racism, white supremacy and police brutality.

The event — billed as a Day of Action and organized largely by young people — included poetry, song and calls for justice for Black Americans killed by police officers. 

Genevieve Andress for NHPR

What happens when a restaurant doesn’t follow social distancing guidelines? Or when restaurant employees who interact with customers don’t wear their required face masks?

Violations of coronavirus guidelines usually end up in the hands of the New Hampshire Attorney General’s Office by way of the phone number and email established for concerns regarding executive orders and guidelines.

Dan Tuohy /NHPR

COVID-19 is altering nearly every aspect of how we live—from the ways we shop, educate our children, work and exercise, to how we access health care and connect with loved ones.

The pandemic also appears to be altering the patterns of how and where people die in New Hampshire, sometimes in unexpected ways.

Tony Webster, Wikimedia Commons

The state’s official stay-at-home order expired at midnight. 

Nearly every corner of the New Hampshire economy, from bowling alleys to libraries to museums, has been given the greenlight to reopen.

But normal remains a long way off,  as new unemployment numbers show that 100,000 residents remain unemployed following a months-long mandated shutdown.

Screenshot

New Hampshire Senate Democrats are backing a proposal that would increase unemployment benefits and make it easier for certain out of work residents to access those benefits moving forward. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

After initially being denied bail by a lower court, Daniel Zeron, 19, will be released on personal recognizance pending trial after a Superior Court judge heard his appeal. 

Zeron was arrested last Monday and charged with criminal threatening for allegedly posting a message on Facebook encouraging people to riot in Manchester. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A New London salon owner suing the governor over allegations that he exceeded his constituional authority when he extended a State of Emergency order due to the coronavirus pandemic appeared in court on Tuesday.

Chris Spielmann/Wikimedia Commons

Starting June 15, restaurants in New Hampshire will be allowed to resume indoor dining service, though restrictions remain in place due to the ongoing risk of transmission of the coronavirus.

According to new guidance issued by Gov. Chris Sununu, restaurants in the northern and western part of the state can resume indoor service as long as tables are spaced six feet apart. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

After his initial restrictions were in place for less than a week, Gov. Chris Sununu is altering the rules for beach access in New Hampshire.

Effective immediately, beaches in the state are open for all activities, including sunbathing. The initial guidelines, which went into effect on Monday, only allowed exercise activities on the sand, such as running or walking, along with swimming and surfing.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A large crowd gathered in Portsmouth on Thursday evening for a Black Lives Matter rally, the latest in a series of events in the state sparked by the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in Minneapolis.

A district court judge is denying bail for a 19-year-old arrested this week after he allegedly posted a message on Facebook encouraging protesters to flip over police cars in Manchester.

Daniel Zeron of Ashland is charged with criminal threatening for his social media post, which was up for less than 24 hours before being deleted.

Lawyers for a 19-year-old man who was arrested on Tuesday after posting a message on Facebook encouraging rioters to tip over police cars told a judge he should be released on bail.

A 19-year old Ashland resident has been arrested and charged with criminal threatening for allegedly posting messages on Facebook encouraging protesters to tip over police cars in Manchester.

Daniel Zeron was detained early Tuesday morning, according to Manchester police, after he allegedly made the social media post from inside of a house in Ashland.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

After more than two months of roped off parking and patrolled sand, New Hampshire’s beaches reopened on Monday.

Huge swaths of the shoreline remained empty, though, likely due to a combination of chilly morning weather and the large number of restrictions that remain in place, including limited parking capacity, in an effort to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

Sign up for our newsletter to get the latest on COVID-19 and efforts to reopen New Hampshire. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The New Hampshire Supreme Court issued two opinions Friday that will require government agencies to share more information with the public.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

While most of the state's businesses appear to be adhering to emergency orders issued by Gov. Chris Sununu designed to limit the spread of the coronavirus, more entities are openly violating the guidelines as the pandemic drags into warmer weather.

Related: What's open and what's not open in New Hampshire?

Courtesy

With parades and public ceremonies cancelled because of the coronavirus, communities across New Hampshire are marking Memorial Day in novel ways.

Across Dover, Rochester and Somersworth, church bells tolled at 10am to mark the day of remembrance.

Subscribe to our coronavirus newsletter to get the latest updates.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

For the faithful, live streaming Sunday Mass is akin to watching fireworks on television: you can see it, and hear it, but you don’t feel it.

“It’s not the same,” said Mary Sanphy of Concord, who has spent the past few months praying alongside a screen. 

On Sunday, though, Sanphy and other Catholics in New Hampshire were able to receive Holy Communion in person for the first time in more than two months.

As long as social distancing is observed and other guidelines followed, the Diocese of Manchester is allowing parishes to offer the Eucharist.

File Photo, NHPR

A recent graduate of Southern New Hampshire University is suing the school, seeking a partial refund on her tuition after in-person classes were cancelled in mid-March due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

New Hampshire's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate ballooned to 16.3 percent in April, the highest level since local reporting on unemployment began in 1976, and a clear indicator of the coronavirus’s staggering impact on the state economy.

Sea / Sean Hurley/NHPR

After two months of being limited to curbside pickup and delivery only, restaurants and cafes across New Hampshire are again serving customers outdoors.

Monday marked the next phase in the gradual reopening of the state’s food service industry, which has been devastated by the coronavirus pandemic and resulting restrictions.

Jon Greenberg, NHPR

Planet Fitness is facing a potential class action lawsuit filed by a member who alleges the New Hampshire-based gym chain charged membership fees despite the facilities closing their doors due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Pete Nakos/NHPR

On May 4, members of Anytime Fitness, a West Lebanon gym, received an unexpected email.

“We are so excited to share with you that our doors are now OPEN,” it read. 

Chris Spielmann/Wikimedia Commons

Manchester is easing the process for restaurants to set up outdoor seating, including using sidewalk space in front of adjacent properties.

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, restaurants in the state will be allowed to serve customers outdoors beginning May 18, though tables will need to be spaced at least six feet apart.

Sign up for NHPR's coronavirus newsletter to get the latest updates.

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