Todd Bookman

Reporter

Todd started at NHPR in 2009 as an intern, and in 2011, took over the health beat. He spent two years at WHYY in Philadelphia covering health and science, before returning to NHPR in 2016 as a general assignment reporter with a focus on business and economics. He holds a master’s degree in public administration from Columbia University.

Ways to Connect

Todd Bookman/NHPR

A former state employee fired for what she alleges was hostility over a request for breastfeeding accommodation argued her case before the Supreme Court of New Hampshire on Tuesday. 

The case has been winding its way through both federal and state courts for more than six years. Kate Frederick, who now resides in Vermont, alleges she was fired from her position at the Department of Health and Human Services in September 2012.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Democrats on the state’s Fiscal Committee rejected a portion of a Department of Justice funding request, saying they didn’t want additional state money going toward lawsuits defending bills they opposed.

The Attorney General requested an additional $1.2 million in funding pay for ongoing litigation, including prosecuting criminal cases and defending two controversial election-related bills passed in previous sessions by Republicans. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

There appears to be little progress being made in a six-month long partisan stalemate over filling a vacancy on the New Hampshire Supreme Court.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

How would an extra $12,000 a year change your lifestyle? Your life? The centerpiece of Andrew Yang’s presidential campaign is something he dubs the Freedom Dividend: a payment of $1,000, every month, to every adult in America. 

George Goslin/Public Domain

Affordable housing isn't an issue getting a lot of attention in presidential campaign advertisements, on cable news or on the debate stage. But it is a topic with relevance to New Hampshire, a state with an incredibly tight rental market and a shortage of affordable housing options.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

Presidential candidate Andrew Yang told an audience of teenagers in Concord today that he wants to lower the voting age in America to 16. He argues it would help promote civic engagement among younger people.

Speaking inside a nearly full auditorium at Concord High School, the former tech entrepreneur said that while some teenagers may not seem well-informed, there are plenty of voting-age adults who also fall into that category.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

With an $82 bet on the New England Patriots to win the Super Bowl, Chris Sununu, the state’s 82nd governor, helped launch sports wagering in New Hampshire on a snowy Monday afternoon.

Pixabay

Some Democrats in the statehouse want to make it easier to sue local gun ranges for noise violations. 

The proposed bill would repeal a 2004 law that grants gun ranges broad immunity from lawsuits, as long as they follow local noise ordinances that were already in place when the range opened. 

NHPR Photo

A group of lawmakers want to create a uniform statewide policy for how local law enforcement officers respond to misconduct within the force, including mandating public disclosure of any allegations. 

Under a bill coming up for debate next session, police officers in New Hampshire would be required to notify their chief when they see a fellow officer violate policy, from tampering with evidence to assaulting a suspect.

Flickr/Bhaskar Dutta

A bill coming before the legislature next year would require news organizations in New Hampshire to update or retract stories on the internet about a criminal proceeding if the defendant is ultimately found not guilty. 

The proposed legislation is sponsored by Rep. Jack Flanagan, a Republican from Brookline, who says two constituents contacted him requesting the measure.

courtesy

A bipartisan group of lawmakers wants to ban the retail sale of dogs, cats and rabbits at New Hampshire pet shops. The move, they say, would help stamp out less reputable breeders known as ‘puppy mills’ where animals are potentially subjected to inhumane conditions.

Pet shop owners, however, say the bill is unnecessary, and that the animals they sell are from regulated breeders.

A tax provision designed to boost local economies across the country has been getting a lot of attention in New Hampshire recently - not for its economic impact, but over allegations of political meddling. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

A logger in Bradford is being ordered to pay a $10,000 fine for repeated violations of the state’s forestry laws.

The so-called enhanced penalty is the first of its kind in New Hampshire.

Under a bill passed in 2011, the Forest Protection Bureau and Attorney General can seek additional financial penalties against individuals with multiple forestry-related convictions during a seven-year period of time.

A recent health inspection at the men’s prison in Concord found 12 separate violations in the kitchen, including damaged equipment, a crumbling ceiling and rodent droppings. 

After receiving a complaint, health inspectors visited the prison the day before Thanksgiving last month. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

In a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court of New Hampshire has ruled that judges in trial courts can set cash bail for defendants at an unattainably high amount, as long as the court deems that the defendant is a flight risk.

In an opinion released Friday, the court agreed with the Attorney General’s office that setting high cash bail in those cases is justified, even if the defendant isn’t also deemed a danger to the public.

Alexius Horatius/Creative Commons

The Episcopal Church of New Hampshire is launching a new training program that it hopes will make  becoming a priest easier for people in different stages of their lives.

Corey Coyle/Creative Commons

A survivor of sex trafficking in New Hampshire is suing four major hotel chains, including Best Western and Marriott International, alleging they profit from forced prostitution and fail to take measures to stop perpetrators who use their hotel rooms.

Members of a group who identify as "Moorish American Nationals" and argue they possess legal status in the United States are suing multiple law enforcement agencies in New Hampshire, claiming a traffic stop violated their rights.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry spent Sunday in New Hampshire campaigning for Joe Biden, part of an endorsement tour that included stops in Nashua and Hampton. The two former senators have known and worked with each other for decades, including during the Obama Administration, where Kerry was the nation’s top foreign diplomat.

Ken Gallager at English Wikipedia

The publicly-funded Land and Community Heritage Investment Program, better known as LCHIP, announced its annual grant recipients on Wednesday.

This year’s winners include Belmont’s Public Library, a building constructed of red brick in the Colonial Revival style.

“Yeah, it was definitely built for a different time,” says Eileen Gilbert, the library’s director, of the 1928 structure. After submitting an application, the Belmont Library will receive $13,355 in LCHIP funds for some exterior work.

Two health care entities ordered to stop doing business in the state will get to appeal that decision during a public hearing in December.

In October, the N.H. Insurance Department issued a cease and desist order against Aliera Healthcare and Trinity HealthShare, two Georgia-based entities that partner to offer and market a health care sharing ministry.

Ken Teegarden via Flickr CC

Despite fears that a 2018 Supreme Court decision would open the floodgates on sales tax collection requests from New Hampshire businesses, a report from the N.H. Department of Justice shows that through October 31, not a single tax authority has filed the necessary notification to collect a tax.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Members of the U.S. Army National Guard as well as a group of 2nd graders from the Christa McAuliffe School gathered at the Old North Cemetery in Concord on Tuesday to mark the 215th birthday of Franklin Pierce. 

Pierce is the only United States president to hail from New Hampshire, serving a single term from 1853 through 1857.

National Archives at College Park

Heading to Uncle Morty’s for a little dry turkey and pie this Thanksgiving? Worried about the traffic? 

Data from the New Hampshire Department of Transportation suggests you're better off waiting until Thursday to hit the road, if possible. 

Baishampayan Ghose via Wikimedia Commons

Officials approved a contract with Boston-based Draft Kings on Monday to bring both in-person and online sports wagering to the state. 

Insurance regulators across the country are taking action against a Georgia-based company that markets and administers programs on behalf of health care sharing ministries.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

For people who pay close attention to politics, this is an unusually busy moment. Two weeks of impeachment hearings in Washington, combined with the crowded field of presidential candidates in the first-in-the-nation primary, is leaving some overwhelmed -- or just plain tuckered out -- in New Hampshire right now. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Spread out on Keith Meehan’s kitchen counter is a mess of unpaid bills with some very large numbers.

“$11,826 for, it looks like, an anesthesiologist,” says Meehan, flipping through the bills. “The surgeon: $18,854. The hospital stay: $150,014.69."

NHPR Staff

In 1993, the New Hampshire Supreme Court ruled that public employee personnel records, including disciplinary records, are exempt from disclosure under the state’s Right to Know law. 

More than 25 years later, that decision, known as Union Leader v. Fenniman, is back under the microscope.


Todd Bookman/NHPR

Gun manufacturer SIG Sauer is facing two more lawsuits claiming its popular P320 pistol fired without a trigger pull.

Both lawsuits involve former law enforcement officers who allege that their P320s unintentionally discharged, leaving both men with severe leg injuries.

[You can read NHPR's previous coverage of concerns involving the P320 here.]

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