Voters

Daniela Allee / NHPR

On a rainy, grey Saturday in January, hundreds filled the gym at Stevens High School in Claremont to see one of the leading Democratic candidates, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

As volunteers handed out signs for people to wave and music blared, I walked around, looking for voters to talk with. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

For people who pay close attention to politics, this is an unusually busy moment. Two weeks of impeachment hearings in Washington, combined with the crowded field of presidential candidates in the first-in-the-nation primary, is leaving some overwhelmed -- or just plain tuckered out -- in New Hampshire right now. 

Population growth in New Hampshire has been fairly modest in the last 20 years or so, but there’s been a substantial change in who is actually living in the state.

That’s according to a recent report from the UNH Carsey School of Public Policy. Senior demographer Ken Johnson is the author of that report. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Johnson about how shifting demographics in New Hampshire could affect the state's voting population in the upcoming presidential election.

Cori Hirai

As they face one of the largest presidential fields in generations, Democratic primary voters in New Hampshire are looking for ways to keep up with all the platforms and policy proposals. 

But for voters of all stripes, navigating the news is more complicated than ever before. Political attacks on news organizations have undermined faith in the press, and as a result, media organizations are often drawn into the political fight of the day. 

NHPR’s Daniela Allee talked with Democratic voters who are recalibrating the way they consume the news as they prepare for the primary.