Politics

Political news from New Hampshire Public Radio, from the State House to the First in the Nation Primary.

After a long, steady rise in the polls, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren is now vying for front-runner status with former Vice President Joe Biden. On Tuesday night, more moderate candidates took aim at her progressive policy positions as unrealistic and expensive.

"Medicare for All" — the single-payer health care plan supported by both Warren and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders — was the main topic in this moderate-progressive fight.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld outlined campaign priorities this week in The Exchange Candidate Forum. Before the main event, NHPR joined him in the building's lobby to continue our "Elevator Pitch" video series. 

The Republican presidential hopeful responded to NHPR's Lauren Chooljian during the forum that he's less of a long shot every day. On the way in, as the elevator door closed, we asked him to make his best pitch to New Hampshire voters for why he deserves their support.

Watch Weld's pitch to New Hampshire voters:

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden is saying for the first time that President Donald Trump must be impeached for abusing the powers of his office to help his own reelection.

Biden said Trump is "shooting holes in the Constitution" by asking foreign powers to interfere in the 2020 election.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Update: Republican Michael Vose defeated Democrat Naomi Andrews to win a special election for a state House seat representing Epping.

Vose won, 880 votes to 806, according to the New Hampshire Secrertary of State's office. Vose, a former state representative, is a retired software technical writer and U.S. Air Force veteran.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

GOP presidential candidate Bill Weld says climate change would have his full attention if he were to win the presidency, calling it one of his top two foreign policy concerns.  "That's an existential threat, not just to our country but to the planet."   

Josh Rogers for NHPR

A few dozen backers of President Trump, including his former campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, took to the street outside the Manchester office of U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen Monday to criticize Democrats.

The Trump re-election campaign and local Republican activists did what they could to bring a Trump campaign rally feel to the corner of Elm and Wall. 


Updated at 10:01 a.m. ET

Senior U.S. diplomats debated the propriety of a White House strategy aimed at pressuring Ukraine for political investigations in exchange for assistance and engagement with President Trump, new documents show.

The Democratic chairmen of three House committees investigating President Trump released dozens of text messages late Thursday from top State Department officials handling European and Ukrainian affairs.

Updated at 6:21 p.m. ET

President Trump now says China should investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter.

Trump brought up China, just days before restarting trade talks with Beijing, while answering questions about his call with his Ukrainian counterpart and what specifically he hoped Ukraine would do about the Biden family.

Courtesy of the Nadig Family Archive

If you follow New Hampshire politics, you’re probably familiar with the ritual of the midnight vote, where a handful of tiny, mostly rural towns stay up late to cast their ballots as soon as election day dawns.

And you would be forgiven for thinking all the credit for this tradition goes to Neil Tillotson, the bespectacled businessman who was so well known as the face of Dixville Notch’s nocturnal vote that he’s honored with his very own bobblehead at the New Hampshire Historical Society gift shop, complete with a ballot box and all.

NHPR

The Exchange sits down with Bill Weld on Tuesday, Oct. 8, at 9 a.m. before a live audience, to discuss the issues shaping the 2020 Primary. Weld served as governor of Massachusetts from 1991 to 1997. We want to hear from you.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Members of New Hampshire’s Democratic congressional delegation welcomed plans to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump this week.

"The American public should be concerned taht we need to take steps to protect national security and our democracy," U.S. Rep. Chris Pappas, D-NH, said. "And it's really important that we ensure that no one is above the law, including the President of the United States."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire finally has a budget for the next two years.

Republican Governor Chris Sununu vetoed the $13.1 billion passed by the Democratically-controlled legislature in June, and the state's temporary spending plan was set to expire next week. 

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

President Trump told Ukraine's president that "a lot of people want to find out" about the activities of former Vice President Joe Biden's family in Ukraine and asked its leader to be in touch with lawyer Rudy Giuliani and Attorney General Bill Barr.

That's according to a briefing for correspondents about the contents of the July 25 phone call, on Wednesday at the Justice Department.

Updated at 11:20 p.m. ET

President Trump has released a transcript of his July call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Hawaii congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard may not have qualified for the most recent presidential debate. But there is a category where she is the Democratic primary’s undisputed frontrunner – campaign signs.

It’s a good sign when a voter takes the mic at a campaign stop to tell a candidate why they could vote for them. What Rob Darrell, an insurance broker from Bow, told Gabbard as she campaigned in Weare earlier this month, is far less common - that his support was triggered by a Gabbard campaign sign.

Congress

Mark Sanford's first presidential campaign stop in New Hampshire began with an interruption in the hopes of being heard.

Sanford, the former South Carolina governor and congressman, entered a Manchester diner and found his way to an AARP meeting in the back. "Can I be rude?" he asked them, trying to introduce himself amid the din of the breakfast diner. He later bounced from booth to booth to chat with other patrons at the restaurant.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio ended his campaign for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination on Friday after struggling to gain traction in a sprawling field of candidates.

Announcing his decision in an MSNBC interview, de Blasio did not throw his support behind any candidate but said he would support the eventual Democratic nominee "with energy."

Casey McDermott, NHPR

New Hampshire is heading into a busy election season, with municipal contests in November, and the first-in-the-nation presidential primary not far behind. This is the first election season since a new law went into effect that redefined the state’s residency standards.

Supporters have said that the law would bring clarity to New Hampshire’s voting rules, but it’s facing a court challenge from the ACLU and the New Hampshire Democratic Party, who say it will discourage otherwise qualified people from voting.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The New Hampshire House and Senate are wrapping up their mostly-failed efforts to override dozens of vetoes handed down by Governor Chris Sununu. The record number of vetoes is one byproduct of having divided government in the state.

But there’s also an almost election-year atmosphere at the State House right now. That's not making it easier for lawmakers and the governor to reach agreement on a big job that’s still incomplete – passing a state budget.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Updated 5:50 PM — State lawmakers have overturned the governor's veto of a bill that would get rid of the three-month waiting period before a patient can get prescribed medical marijuana from a provider.

It was the lone bill overturned this week by both the House and Senate. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Democrats have offered, and Governor Sununu has rejected, what Democratic state lawmakers are calling a compromise on the state budget. The budget process has been at an impasse since Sununu vetoed the budget passed by lawmakers earlier this year.

House Judiciary

Donald Trump's former campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, has refused to answer most questions congressional Democrats put to him Tuesday about alleged obstruction of justice by the President.

Lewandowski sparred with the House Judiciary Committee chairman from the start of his testimony.

House Judiciary

Corey Lewandowski, Donald Trump's former campaign manager who is considering a run for U.S. Senate in New Hampshire in 2020, is testifying before the U.S. House Judiciary Committee's hearing Tuesday.

Watch Lewandowski, who lives in Windham, N.H., testifiy live below. The Judiciary committee's hearing is titled, "Presidential Obstruction of Justice and Abuse of Power." 

Lewandowski repeated several of Trump's assertions, for starters calling the FBI investigation a "fake" Russian probe. He insisted there was no collusion.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Bernie Sanders turned his outsider credentials and call for political revolution into a commanding victory in the 2016 New Hampshire primary. But as he seeks a repeat performance, the Vermont senator could face unlikely competition.

On their own, Andrew Yang, Tulsi Gabbard and Marianne Williamson sit near the bottom of the New Hampshire polls. But together, their novel calls for dramatic change to American politics could attract just enough support to complicate Sanders' path to victory in a tight New Hampshire race.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

With New Hampshire well into the swing of the presidential primary season, a new podcast from NHPR explores how the state has kept hold of its first-in-the-nation primary status.

It's called Stranglehold, and the first episode is out now. It's called "The Guardian," and it examines the role of Secretary of State Bill Gardner, the man who's been called the "Guardian" of the New Hampshire primary for decades.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Stranglehold co-hosts Lauren Chooljian and Jack Rodolico about the new podcast, which will run right up to the 2020 presidential primary.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire Democrats – and nearly every candidate seeking their party’s nomination for president -- were in Manchester Saturday for the state Democratic convention.

Ruth Davis of Durham, who wore a button for Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, said seeing so many candidates up close would prompt many voters, even ones who think they’ve made up their minds, to reassess the field.

Todd Bookman for NHPR

Almost all of the Democrats running for president will appear at the state party's convention in Manchester this weekend. But long before many of the candidates started showing up at conventions, cookouts and coffee shops, they’ve been steering money toward local Democratic committees and campaigns here in New Hampshire.

The Democratic National Committee has been putting pressure on the state of Iowa to make their caucus more accessible to voters.

This led Iowa officials to roll out a plan for a new virtual caucus. But the DNC confirmed last week it would reject the plan.

With changes to the Iowa caucus on the horizon, there are fears surrounding New Hampshire’s reaction, given the Granite State’s history of fiercely protecting its first-in-the-nation primary status.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Congressman Chris Pappas spoke with The Exchange on a variety of issues including climate change legislation, background checks, and the I-93 expansion.  Here are some highlights from that conversation. 

Listen to the show and read the transcript. 

Arctic.NOAA.gov

Five Democratic presidential candidates in the span of 24 hours have released sweeping plans to address climate change, ahead of a series of town halls devoted to the issue.

On Wednesday, California Sen. Kamala Harris and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg each unveiled their climate plans. New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Obama cabinet member Julián Castro each laid out theirs on Tuesday.

Pages