Laurie List | New Hampshire Public Radio

Laurie List

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 18, 2020

Sep 18, 2020

Smoke from West Coast wildfires has dimmed our sunshine - could we see extensive fire damage here, and what’s the link to climate change? The New Hampshire Supreme Court heard oral arguments this week in a case that will decide if a list containing the names of more than 250 law enforcement officers with credibility issues should be disclosed to the public. We also find out about inconsistencies in psychological evaluations used in the hiring process at N.H. police departments. We find out about a demonstration at Cathedral Ledge in the Mt. Washington valley. And what will leaf-peeping be like this this fall?

 

 

Ken Watson / KenWatson.net

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del jueves 17 de septiembre.  

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Trabajadores electorales piden ajustes en procesos de emission de papeletas de votos ausente

Los trabajadores electorales dijeron que las recientes elecciones primarias fluyeron bien a pesar de la cantidad de cambios que se realizaron por el COVID-19. 

Appleswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

The New Hampshire Supreme Court heard oral arguments Wednesday in a case that will decide if a list containing the names of more than 250 law enforcement officers with credibility issues should be disclosed to the public.

Appleswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire’s highest court will hear oral arguments Wednesday on whether a secret list of police officers with credibility issues should be released to the public.

A group of media companies led by the N.H. Center for Public Interest Journalism, as well as the ACLU of New Hampshire, sued in 2018 for the release of the Exculpatory Evidence Schedule, better known as the "Laurie List." 

www.BackgroundNow.com / Flickr/Creative Commons

A pair of recent New Hampshire Supreme Court decisions could lead the way toward more transparency surrounding misconduct by public employees, including police officers.

The court ruled that internal personnel practices aren’t automatically exempt from disclosure under the state’s right-to-know law. 

The ACLU of New Hampshire was co-counsel for both cases. NHPR’s Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with the organization’s legal director, Gilles Bissonnette, about how this could provide better access to public information.

NHPR Photo

A group of lawmakers want to create a uniform statewide policy for how local law enforcement officers respond to misconduct within the force, including mandating public disclosure of any allegations. 

Under a bill coming up for debate next session, police officers in New Hampshire would be required to notify their chief when they see a fellow officer violate policy, from tampering with evidence to assaulting a suspect.

A list containing the names of approximately 250 New Hampshire law enforcement officers who may have credibility issues must be made public, according to an order issued by a Superior Court judge.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 1, 2019

Feb 28, 2019

The New Hampshire House takes a big step toward legalizing recreational marijuana in the state, but Gov. Chris Sununu has already promised to veto. The New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon gets clearance to host a country music festival. And a Sig Sauer executive goes to court in Germany over a weapons deal. This and other stories from the week in news.

NHPR File Photo

The ACLU of New Hampshire, along with a group of news organizations, is suing the N.H. Attorney General over the release of an internal list of police officers with credibility issues.

Appleswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

Some groups in New Hampshire, including the ACLU, are arguing that the names on a state-wide list of police officers with credibility issues should be released to the public.

Local police chiefs place officers on what's commonly referred to as the "Laurie List" after internal investigators determine that their credibility has been harmed by committing a crime, lying, or other inappropriate actions.