Hampton

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Unusually high king tides on parts of the Seacoast may cause flooding in the next few days.

The colloquial term refers to unusually high tides, over 10 feet on the Seacoast.  A series of those high tides are forecast through Wednesday. This can cause minor flooding on streets that border tidal areas, in towns like Hampton.

On Sunday, the beach town was also hit with rain and gusty winds. The tide inundated the back marsh of Hampton Beach, pushing some low-level flooding onto some streets.

Courtesy

Federal engineers have begun a $4.6 million dredging project in Hampton-Seabrook harbor.

Vessel owners in the state's largest fishing port say the emergency dredge is long overdue.

They say sandy shoals that have built up on the bottom of the harbor are creating navigational hazards and hurting their businesses.

Senator Jeanne Shaheen has advocated for the project. She filmed a video Monday near the dredge site.

Sara Plourde

Decades before the Salem witch trials, two women were accused of witchcraft in New Hampshire. Jane Walford and Eunice Cole stood trial in the same year, within just a few miles of each other, but their lives ended quite differently. The fates of these women might provide insight into what a historical witch actually was, and why some survived their trials while others did not. 

 

The Department of Education’s civil rights office will investigate an allegation of racism at a school in Hampton, stemming from complaints made by the parents of a young girl.

John and Julie Cochrane say their daughter Kora was bullied for her race at two different Hampton elementary schools, starting in between 2016.

Kora is black and her adoptive parents are white.

Courtesy of SAU 90

A parent in Hampton wants the state attorney general to intervene after, she says, local school board officials restricted her right to free speech.

The school district is in turmoil as officials investigate a claim their middle school principal created a hostile environment.

Parents have taken to social media to call the investigation unfair, instead criticizing Hampton superintendent Kathleen Murphy’s handling of the situation.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Editor's note: This is the first story in a two-part series. Here is part two

The schools in Hampton are in the midst of debate over how to handle racism and prejudice. 

The issue came into focus earlier this year, when the white parents of a black third-grader said school officials had mishandled their reports of racist bullying. 

Dan Tuohy

It's been a great summer for piping plovers in New Hampshire.

New Hampshire's Fish and Game Department says a record number of state-endangered and federally threatened piping plovers hatched this summer at Hampton and Seabrook beaches.

Five pairs nested on Hampton Beach fledged 10 chicks. On Seabrook Beach, six pairs of plovers fledged 10 chicks. Those numbers surpassed last year's record of nine pairs and 17 chicks fledged, respectively.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

A new addiction recovery service center is open in Hampton, despite a delay in some promised state funding.

The Hampton recovery center, located on Lafayette Road close to Seabrook and Hampton Falls, is the third run by the nonprofit SOS, which also has locations in Rochester and Dover.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Hampton residents are talking about how their public schools can do a better job handling prejudice.

About 50 people, most of them white, came out to a listening session held by the local school district Monday night.

Superintendent Kathleen Murphy says Hampton has been working toward a meeting like this for more than a year. 

The school district in Hampton will hold a listening session about diversity Monday night, after allegations of racist bullying in an elementary school.

The district says it planned the event “to discuss diversity issues that impact our community.”

It comes after the parents of a black third-grader criticized administrators for their handling of more than two years of reported bullying.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

 

New Hampshire authorities investigating a suspicious death in Hampton have released the victim's name but not how he died.

The Attorney General's office says Hampton police officers responding to a 911 call on Saturday found 34-year-old Juan Astacio unconscious in his apartment with obvious injuries. He was taken to a hospital where he later died.

An autopsy was conducted Monday. The manner of death was ruled a homicide but the cause is being withheld pending further investigation.

 

Hampton school officials have rejected a local family’s request for tuition reimbursement after allegations of racist bullying.

The family says their daughter, who is black, was bullied for her race by other students in her third-grade class.

The parents say the school district didn’t do enough to respond. They transferred their daughter to a private school in Massachusetts last month.

They asked the Hampton school board to help cover their new tuition with a reimbursement of the district's per-pupil cost, under what’s called a manifest hardship designation.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

At a state listening session on diversity last night, Hampton residents said communities like theirs need more resources to confront issues of prejudice.

The event was held amid ongoing controversy over allegations of racist bullying in a local elementary school.

NH DHHS

A final report from state health officials concludes that an outbreak of Legionnaires' Disease in Hampton sickened up to 49 people last year, and was linked to two deaths.

State epidemiologists traced the outbreak to a hot tub at The Sands Hotel in Hampton. After the hot tub was ordered closed in late August, there were no new additional cases reported.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR file photo, aerial support by Lighthawk

At town meeting in Hampton Tuesday, residents could take another big step in adapting to rising seas.

Voters will decide whether to require pilings under new structures in certain at-risk coastal areas.

DOT

 

The state is getting closer to choosing how to replace the aging drawbridge that connects Hampton and Seabrook.

Officials say the Hampton Harbor Bridge is one of only two bascule bridges left in the state. That's a drawbridge that opens from the center to let boats pass.

The bridge, built in 1949, carries up to 18,000 vehicles a day. The drawbridge opens around 800 times a year and has gotten stuck at least twice since 2017.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Last weekend's winter storm caused only moderate flooding on New Hampshire's Seacoast. But it provided a window into how rising seas will make flooding more frequent, bringing challenges to the state's coastal communities.

Screenshot via office of Sen. Jeanne Shaheen

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will begin planning emergency dredging of Hampton Harbor over the next year.

The Army Corps' 2018 Work Plan includes $275,000 for planning work ahead of dredging.

The funds will let the Corps assess dredging conditions and draw up a contract for the project.

New Hampshire's Congressional delegation has been pushing since last year for the harbor to be dredged.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Senator Maggie Hassan is criticizing the Trump administration’s plan to roll back the Clean Power Plan, an environmental policy of the Obama White House.

Senator Hassan made the remarks as she toured Brayton Energy in Hampton. The company designs high-efficiency, low-emission turbine engines.

Hassan says the Clean Power Plan, which required states to cut back on CO2 emissions would’ve helped protect New Hampshire from the effects of carbon pollution.

File Photo

The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear a case brought by a Hampton fisherman over the cost of fishing regulations.

David Goethel was hoping to challenge in court the federal government’s at-sea monitoring program.

The program puts regulators on fisherman’s boats to make sure they are adhering to catch limits, but fishermen are responsible for the costs of the program, at an estimated $700 a trip.

Goethel says those costs are stifling and illegal, but on Monday the Supreme Court announced it would not hear the case.

Cheryl Senter

A Hampton selectman is surveying local businesses in an effort to discover exactly how much the town contributes to state coffers through the rooms and meals tax.

New Hampshire's tax on rooms and meals is levied by the state and then redistributed to towns on the basis of population. Cities and towns get more money if they have more people.

Hampton Selectman Regina Barnes says that formula is a bad deal for her town, because with its many restaurants and hotels, it puts more in than it gets out.

Jason Moon for NHPR

The town of Hampton is taking the state to court. Officials there want the town reimbursed for services it provides at the state owned beach.

Local and state officials have long disagreed about exactly who is responsible for what at Hampton Beach, which is in the town of Hampton but owned and operated by the state.

An investigation by the state Attorney General’s office has concluded that state troopers were justified in their use of deadly force in the shooting of a Portsmouth man last month.

At a press conference Thursday afternoon, investigators released audio and video evidence of the encounter between police and Barry Jones outside the Hampton state liquor store in June.

Sara Plourde, NHPR

At thirteen miles in length, New Hampshire has the shortest coastline of any US state (excluding those with no coast at all). But what it lacks in distance, it makes up for in vibrancy. As part of our series Life on the Seacoast, I traveled the full length of NH's coast, along Highway Route 1, stopping each mile to document the happenings and the habitats on the way.

Click here to view the photo essay in its entirety.

Voters in Hampton will decide whether a proposed 25 million dollar renovation of Hampton Academy middle school will proceed.

The plan calls for an extensive renovation of Hampton Academy, including a new gymnasium and overhauls of the existing building’s interior. The total cost of the project is 24.9 million dollars.

Hampton School District Superintendent Kathleen Murphy says the renovation is long overdue.

A preliminary report by federal investigators on a small plane that crashed in North Hampton on Labor Day, killing two, showed no evidence of any mechanical failure or malfunction.

The National Transportation Safety Board released its report Tuesday. Eighty-one-year-old pilot David Ingalls and 62-year-old passenger Bruce Anderson, both of Kingston, were killed in the crash, which happened shortly after the plane took off at Hampton Airfield.

Update 3:50 PM:

Federal investigators say an initial probe shows the small plane that crashed shortly after takeoff in New Hampshire had no obvious mechanical failures before it fell from the sky, killing two people.

Todd Gunther of the National Transportation Safety Board says witness accounts indicate the Cessna pitched up sharply after take-off on Monday at Hampton Airfield, rolled to the left then plummeted into trees.