Outside/In

Saturday at 11 am, Sunday at 10 pm
  • Hosted by Sam Evans-Brown

Outside/In is a show about the natural world and how we use it. Host Sam Evans-Brown combines solid reporting and long-form narrative storytelling to bring the outdoors to you wherever you are. You don’t have to be a whitewater kayaker, an obsessive composter, or a conservation biologist to love Outside/In. It’s a show for anyone who has ever been outdoors. In short, it’s a show for *almost* everyone.

Outside/In: Mysteries in the Woods

Jun 22, 2018

On today's show, two stories about mysterious things in the woods: mushrooms and maple. First, if you want to eat wild mushrooms - and lots of people do - you have to go into the forest and find them yourself. But that can get dangerous... fast. Then, maple syrup, the quintessential North American product, is in the midst of a radical shift... but a shift toward what? 

In today's episode, we're talking about species that thrive... and some that don't. First, an American lobster discovered in European waters raises some important questions: is it invasive or just non-native? Then the story of two birds: one universally reviled and the other an avian celebrity. 

There are different kinds of lobster… you know this, right? You’ve seen Blue Planet.

Outside/In: 'Raw Water' Trends

Jun 18, 2018

In this week's episode, stories of magical thinking. First, what's better - the tap you know, or the roadside spring you don't? We dig into the "raw water" trend, and sample some springs around the state. Then, you can throw a Christmas wreath in the bin, but that doesn't mean it's going to get recycled; we'll investigate how changes to the international waste trade, and our habit of 'wishful recycling' might just land more of our goods in the landfill. Then we make Sam ruin some of our favorite stuff for the sake of environmentalism. 

Mike from Poughkeepsie asks:

“During an episode of the West Wing President Bartlett gets upset when he finds out that at leadership breakfasts they’ll be serving Vermont Maple Syrup versus New Hampshire Maple Syrup. That got me thinking, can you tell the difference between maple syrups made in different places? Local pride in quality aside, is there a way to distinguish New Hampshire maple syrup from Vermont maple syrup or Canadian maple syrup?”

Sam Evans-Brown

Ari Ofsevit is a guy from Boston fueled by an intense, nerdy love for sports. The day after running the 2016 Boston Marathon, his face was all over the cover of the Boston Globe and on all of the network news channels, but on the internet, people were accusing him of cheating. This is Ari’s story.

Brendan Ryan via Flickr CC | https://flic.kr/p/bziK8Y

A mini episode about one of the world's cutest predators.

The Shrike

Henry David Thoreau

Hark—hark—from out the thickest fog
Warbles with might and main
The fearless shrike, as all agog
To find in fog his gain.

His steady sail he never furls
At any time o' year,
And perched now on winter's curls,
He whistles in his ear.

Jody McIntyre via Flickr CC | https://flic.kr/p/KNirW

Something very different is going on up in Boothbay, Maine. It was an experiment which – if it works – could represent a fundamental shift in the way we think about using electricity.

For alpinist Ben Clark, scaling the world’s toughest mountains was a source of pride and peace; for his parents it was a source of constant worry. After they learned to live with their son’s adventurous streak, Ben decided to quit the mountaineer life altogether. Why? The answer may surprise you.

An Everest Ethics Question

Tyler Armstrong is 12 years old. He likes to play laser tag.  He’s learning to play guitar. And this spring he's heading to China, where he will attempt to summit the world's highest mountain. In this episode, an ethical debate: how young is too young to climb Mount Everest?

Selbe B via Flickr/CC

In the early '90s Keene, New Hampshire created a pumpkin festival to bring the community together, but after 24 years the quaint festival tore the town apart.

Ginkgo Biloba is a beautiful tree with an incredible history that dates back millions of years – it’s also a popular street tree among urban foresters. So why are some cities clamoring to have all their ginkgoes cut down, while others are planting them in the thousands? The answer has to do with your dirty gym socks, 19th century London smog, and maybe, the curious appetites of long-dead dinosaurs.

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In 1998, Forest Quimby spent thousands of dollars building one of the most beautiful, most elaborate docks on Franklin Pierce Lake in New Hampshire. There was just one problem – it was illegal. In this story, we hear about Quimby’s seventeen-year battle with the NH Department of Environmental Services, and find out why small-scale environmental regulations are so hard to enforce.

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Megan Tan

In 2015 about 2,700 of the 50,000 people who applied will receive a moose permit in Maine and if you’re one of the lucky ones who has waited 20 years for this moment, you’re going to want an expert on your team. You’re going to want a moose whisperer.  

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For this first foray out into the woods, we're checking out something called vernal pools. Vernal, meaning springtime, and pools as in... pools. These are little (and sometimes not so little!) pools that form when spring rains combine with winter snow-melt to make some really wet spots. These puddles might look a little gross, especially after they have been sitting there for a few weeks--and are full of all sorts of sliminess--but they are absolutely essential to all sorts of bizarre critters.

You'll never listen to the spring peepers the same way again.

Logan Shannon

...Or, How Sam Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Cold Hardy Kiwi.

Iago Hale has a vision: it’s one where the economy of the North Country is revitalized by local farmers selling delicious cold hardy kiwi berries to the masses.

Meanwhile, Tom Lautzenheiser has been battling a hardy kiwi infestation in Massachusetts for years, and is afraid that this fight will soon be coming to the rest of New England.

Should we worry about the cold hardy kiwi and what does the quest to bring it to market tell us about what an invasive species is?