CD2 Voters Send Kuster To Congress For Fourth Term

Nov 7, 2018

Credit Jason Moon for NHPR

Congresswoman Ann McLane Kuster cruised to a reelection victory Tuesday. Kuster won her fourth term in office in New Hampshire's 2nd Congressional District, beating Republican Steve Negron.

“Tonight the people of New Hampshire’s second congressional district sent a message loud and clear: they want a Granite State and they want a country where no one is left behind," Kuster told supporters at her headquarters in Concord.

Negron, in conceding the race, noted his appreciation for the respectful tone of the contest.

“It was important for us to make sure that this campaign was about the issues and we didn’t get into the mud-slinging that you normally see," he said.

Negron also said that with Democratic wins in the state, this is a time for the Republican party to reflect on what they can do better for 2020.

"You know there are some things we didn't anticipate," he said. "I think the people have spoken in the state of New Hampshire to figure out how we get those people back into the ranch."

Kuster will now head back to Congress for her fourth term -- a historic winning streak for Democrats in the 2nd district. But it will be the first time she’s been in Congress with a Democratic majority, a situation that could create new political challenges down the road.

Negron spoke to supporters at his election headquarters in Nashua
Credit Daniela Allee for NHPR

Supporter Dan Moran said he wants Kuster to serve in the new Democratic majority as a check on President Donald Trump. Or perhaps as even more than just a check.

“We’d like to see them make him as miserable as they possibly can. It’s as easy as that.”

But holding the president’s feet to the fire could prove an uncomfortable balancing act for Kuster, who ran on her bipartisan, moderate credentials. That was a theme she returned to her in her victory speech.

“When I went to Congress I promised a new approach. And that’s what we’ve done, bringing people together – Republican, Democrats, Independents – to solve complex problems.”

How Kuster adapts that new approach to the new power dynamics in Washington will be just one of the challenges she faces in her new term in Congress.