Daniela Allee | New Hampshire Public Radio

Daniela Allee

Reporter

Daniela is NHPR's reporter in the Upper Valley and Monadnock regions. You can email her at dallee@nhpr.org.

Robert Garrova

The ACLU of New Hampshire has filed a lawsuit against the Merrimack police department in federal court, arguing that the department illegally detained an immigrant.

Willy Fernando Godoy-Ramirez was a passenger in a car that broke down along Daniel Webster Highway on August 29, 2019.

Police had asked for the driver and Godoy-Ramirez’s identification, and told both to stay in the vehicle for about an hour until Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrived, according to court documents.

Both Godoy-Ramirez and the driver provided identification from Guatemala.

NHPR File

A Grafton Superior Court judge has denied Littleton Regional Healthcare's request for an injunction related to the opening of a private urgent care facility in town.

Matt York / AP

Immigration advocates in New Hampshire are preparing for it to become more expensive to apply for citizenship and legal residence.

It currently costs $640 to apply for citizenship. But a proposed rule by the federal government would bump that application fee to $1,170 starting in 2020. Other fees are set to rise as well, though some will go down. [Go to Table 19 on this PDF to see the proposed fee changes, or view them in the slideshow above.]

Bruno Soares is an immigration advocate in Nashua. He says the changes could put citizenship out of reach for some legal residents.

CyberHades / Flicker/CC

School leaders from the Sunapee School District met with U.S. Sen. Maggie Hassan Friday to talk about cybersecurity. The district was the recent target of an attempted ransomware attack.

Sunapee Technology Director Mike Montore was going through his Sunday night routine on Columbus Day Weekend when he noticed he could no longer log into the district's servers.

"I came in Monday morning, and it was real obvious, real quick as soon as I started," he said. 

PEXELS

A Grafton Superior Court judge says he'll rule later on an injunction filed by Littleton Regional Healthcare related to the opening of an urgent care facility in the town.

Littleton Regional filed the injunction in October against the Department of Health and Human Services, after the commissioner determined that there would be no adverse effect on the hospital if a ConvenientMD clinic opened less than 3 miles away.

Courtesy of U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Immigration advocates in Lebanon are hoping to get a "welcoming" ordinance approved in that city. 

Under the ordinance, city employees could not ask about a person’s immigration status or participate in immigration enforcement actions. 

Yolanda Huerta is with Rise Upper Valley, an activist organization working on immigration issues. She says she and others have lost faith that reforms will happen on the federal level. 

Flicker CC / https://flic.kr/p/drsrm8

An application to build what could be New Hampshire's largest solar array cleared its first step at a public meeting Tuesday with the state's Site Evaluation Committee.

Committee members unanimously voted that NextEra Energy’s application was complete.

The 30 megawatt solar array in Fitzwilliam could be the state’s largest and is the first solar proposal to come before the SEC.

NextEra had requested a waiver for on certain decommissioning requirements of the solar array.  But the committee unanimously voted to defer ruling on that request until later in the process.

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth College scientists have discovered a gene in plants that’s controls how much iron the plant takes in from the soil.

Mary Lou Guerinot, a professor of biological sciences at Dartmouth, was part of the team that discovered the gene. 

“What we’ve been studying is how plants take up iron from the soil with the goal of making food people eat more nutritious,” she said.

The gene Guerinot and other researchers discovered, Upstream Regulator of I-R-T-1, also known as URI, controls when genes should be expressed in the root of the plant to begin iron uptake.

Via the town of Northumberland website

Several towns in Cheshire and Coos counties are getting $300 thousand dollars in federal rural development grants.

The Northern Forest Center received about two-thirds of that grant money to expand broadband access and digital literacy in Lancaster.

The town of Northumberland received $50 thousand dollars to buy defibrillator technology that will help first responders better discern symptoms related to heart attacks or overdoses.

A Keene organization that helps low-income residents with energy efficiency improvements also received some grant money.

Claremont residents have approved a measure to spend one-time relief money the school district received from the state on three special education programs.

Vaping360 / Flickr/CC - http://vaping360.com/

Dartmouth Hitchcock Health is reaching out to teens and families as part of its new anti-vaping campaign.

The campaign, called No Safe Vape, focuses on presenting facts about the dangers of vaping to kids and their families. It also aims to provide local and national resources people can access.

Brian O’Sullivan is a pediatric pulmonologist at Dartmouth Hitchcock. He says educating parents to look for signs of vaping is important because often, they're unaware it's happening.

Daniela Allee / NHPR

Immigration advocates in New Hampshire are working on ways to get presidential candidates more engaged with their issue.

About 30 advocates from around the state met today in Manchester to talk about what’s happening in New Hampshire's immigrant communities.

Many said they don't feel immigration is getting enough attention.

The Granite State Organizing Project has been setting up meetings with presidential candidates to talk about the issue.

courtesy of Franklin Pierce University

Franklin Pierce University is creating a new institute that’ll focus on combating climate change.

The Institute for Climate Action will focus on community outreach, education on campus, finding ways to make campus operations more sustainable and partnering with local organizations.

Last year’s report on climate change from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change spurred the creation of the institute. The report said that significant actions need to be taken in the next decade to curb the effects of climate change.

Daniela Allee / NHPR

Earlier this year, NHPR did a survey of what questions, concerns and stories our listeners wanted to hear when it came to the 2020 primary. One theme that came up several times was civility in political and national conversations.

In Keene, a group has been meeting since early 2017 to talk about politics civilly, and they’ve learned a lot about how to do it.


NHPR File Photo

Carroll County Commissioners voted 2 to 1 Wednesday against continuing the county jail's current Medication Assisted Treatment program, also known as MAT. MAT provides anti-opioid medications, along with counseling and therapy, to help people with substance use disorders.

Rockingham, Strafford, Cheshire, Grafton and Sullivan counties, along with the state prison in Berlin, and the men and women’s prison in Concord, currently offer this type of treatment.

Carroll County's MAT program has been in limbo since commissioners voted 2 to 1 in October against having an MAT policy.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Dartmouth College had a plan to build a wood chip burning plant to heat its campus. This would have added a new biomass market for landowners and foresters within a 50 mile radius of Hanover.  

But, after months of local pressure the College said it would reconsider building the plant. Dartmouth’s decision speaks to the complexity of using wood biomass to transition away from burning fossil fuels.


Daniela Allee / NHPR

People in West Lebanon had a chance to tour New Hampshire’s first net-zero multi-family residential building. 

About 400 solar panels will power Tracy Community Housing. Some are on the roof, and others are on the south side of the building. Each apartment has a mini-split unit that’ll cool or heat the apartment using air source heat pumps.

Daniela Allee / NHPR

At an art gallery in Lebanon on Tuesday night, surrounded by photographs of compost, community members gathered to talk about trash.

Saran wrap, an empty box of broth and plastic firemen’s hats sat in neat display at the feet of Marc Morgan, Lebanon’s solid waste facility manager and Evelyn Swett, a photographer.

The two facilitated a conversation with a group of twelve people about waste, and finding ways to reduce it.

Ali Oshinskie

The judge overseeing the proposed $14 million settlement between Dartmouth College and nine plaintiffs in a class action lawsuit has some concerns about the agreement.

The Valley News reports that at a preliminary hearing on Thursday, Judge Landya McCafferty expressed worries that legal precedent could prevent her from approving the settlement class, and that the group was potentially too broad.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A group of advocates will address the issue of domestic violence in immigrant communities this weekend.

The event Saturday was spurred by incidents in the Brazilian community in New Hampshire and neighboring states, including several women killed by their partners.

www.visitnhcolleges.com

About 60 people attended a discussion about Indigenous People's Day Monday afternoon at Keene State College.  Panelists focused on education, land and local history of Native Americans.

Jeniffer Afualo-Robinson is a senior at Keene State. As part of an independent study, she created a timeline of the lives of the Western Abenaki people who lived in the area before colonization.

She says the project made this history much more visible to her.

Cori Hirai

As they face one of the largest presidential fields in generations, Democratic primary voters in New Hampshire are looking for ways to keep up with all the platforms and policy proposals. 

But for voters of all stripes, navigating the news is more complicated than ever before. Political attacks on news organizations have undermined faith in the press, and as a result, media organizations are often drawn into the political fight of the day. 

NHPR’s Daniela Allee talked with Democratic voters who are recalibrating the way they consume the news as they prepare for the primary. 

NHPR File Photo

Carroll County Commissioners voted two to one last Wednesday against a policy that would provide medication assisted treatment to inmates who aren't on that program before they get to jail.

But the Carroll County Jail superintendent still plans to move forward with the proposed policy. 

Medication assisted treatment provides anti-opioid medications, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, to help people dealing with substance use disorders.

CDC.gov

Since 2000, nine hospitals in New Hampshire have closed labor and delivery units. Four of those have been in the Upper Valley. But as NHPR's Daniela Allee reports, in response to these closures, two Upper Valley midwives plan on opening a birthing center next spring.

The Gentle Landing Midwifery and Birth Center already has patients booked into next spring.

Google maps

The town of Warner will be the site of a new tour on Sunday as part of the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire.

The tour will highlight the lives of black families and individuals, including Anthony Clark, a musician and dance master; and James Haskell, a veteran of the 54th Massachusetts Colored Regiment.

JerriAnne Boggis is the director of the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire. She says it’s important to bring individuals from town history to life.

The New Hampshire Attorney General's Office has amended its finding in a fatal 2016 officer involved shooting of a 25-year-old Claremont man, Cody LaFont.

The Attorney General's office initially concluded that the shooting was "legally justified," but it decided to re-examine the case after the officer involved was convicted of falsifying documents related to a police search last year.

Wikimedia Creative Commons

  Ruggles Mine, a former tourist attraction in Grafton, has a new owner. 

For decades, tourists from around the world visited the mine, where they'd hammer away, trying to find something shiny. But the mine closed in 2016 and has been for sale ever since.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

Dartmouth College says it’s reassessing its plan to build a wood burning heating plant that would replace its current oil-burning plant.

The biomass plant was one piece of a $200 million project that is part of Dartmouth's plan to reduce its emissions.

The other part, which the college still plans on moving forward with, is converting its steam heating system to a more efficient hot-water system.

Earlier this summer, prominent scientist alumni penned a letter opposing the plant, saying the college should look into a way to generate heat without burning anything.

Courtesy of U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Earlier this month, Customs and Border Protection detained 24 undocumented immigrants in the Lebanon area, four of those at a roadside checkpoint.

But documents obtained by the New Hampshire ACLU show another, less publicly visible method that CBP uses.

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