WebHeader_Grove.png
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Support local and independent journalism by making a gift to NHPR today.
NH News

Proposed N.H. 'parental bill of rights' appears to be moving forward despite earlier impasse

The wall of a school shows the words "hopeful," "respectful" and "responsible" along with other drawings.
Casey McDermott
/
NHPR
The Senate's version of the bill has been opposed by LGBTQ+ rights groups, teachers unions and the New Hampshire Attorney General’s Office, who have raised concerns that the law would require schools to “out” trans students to their parents.

House and Senate lawmakers will continue to negotiate a controversial “parental rights” bill, despite an impasse Tuesday that had appeared final.

(Click here to read NHPR's earlier coverage of the negotiations over this bill.)

The Legislature announced Wednesday that the committee of conference for the bill will reconvene on Thursday at 9 a.m. That committee had met Tuesday but ended with Senate and House negotiators unable to find a compromise between Senate and House versions of the bill.

Among other requirements, the bill would require schools to notify parents about any classes, clubs, or sports teams they joined, any instances where their child sought counseling or medical service, and any times that their child had sought help or support regarding their gender identity.

That version of the bill, which was passed by the Senate, has been opposed by LGBTQ+ rights groups, teachers unions, and the state Attorney General’s Office, who have raised concerns that the law would require schools to “out” trans students to their parents.

House Republican negotiators also opposed the Senate version, citing similar points, and advocated for their original version of the bill, which established parental rights but did not include a notification requirement.

Despite both sides walking away without a resolution Tuesday, the newly scheduled negotiation meeting opens the possibility for the two sides to still find compromise. Committee of conference negotiators have until 4 p.m. Thursday to submit final reports. The Senate president and House speaker may swap out representatives for each respective chamber in order to achieve a compromise.

New Hampshire Bulletin is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. New Hampshire Bulletin maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Dana Wormald for questions: info@newhampshirebulletin.com. Follow New Hampshire Bulletin on Facebook and Twitter.

You make NHPR possible.

NHPR is nonprofit and independent. We rely on readers like you to support the local, national, and international coverage on this website. Your support makes this news available to everyone.

Give today. A monthly donation of $5 makes a real difference.