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Thursday marks the restart of widespread testing for PFAS chemicals in New Hampshire’s public water supplies, after a year-long delay due to a lawsuit from PFAS-maker 3M.

PFAS are industrial chemicals, widely found in groundwater and linked to health problems including liver and kidney disease, high cholesterol and reproductive, developmental and immune issues, as well as potentially some cancers.

NAMI-NH

It's no secret the pandemic has caused general levels of anxiety and depression to rise, and that holds true for young people. The New Hampshire chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness sees this manifesting in one troubling statistic - the rise in the number of young people waiting for a bed for psychiatric care.

All Things Considered Host Peter Biello interviewed Ken Norton, executive director of NAMI New Hampshire, for more on this.


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A new emissions inventory for the city of Concord points to potential climate change solutions as the state capital works to sharply lower its greenhouse gas emissions.

Concord’s city council set its climate change goals in 2018. They want all electricity used locally to come from renewable sources by 2030, and the same for heating, cooling and transportation by 2050.

NHPR

After eight years as chancellor of the University System of New Hampshire, Todd Leach will step down from his role at the end of 2020.

Starting next July, Leach will transition to a five-year appointment at the University of New Hampshire.

Courtesy of ProPublica's Electionland

At NHPR, we want to make sure you have the information you need to cast your vote safely and securely this fall, with some changes in place due to COVID-19. We also want to know if New Hampshire voters are running into any challenges when trying to cast a ballot. That’s where you can help.

Coronavirus updates for New Hampshire
CDC

NHPR is continuing to cover the developing story around coronavirus in New Hampshire. Bookmark this page for the latest updates, including case numbers and other important news of the day. Click here for all of our COVID-19 coverage.

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A New Hampshire man will face more time in prison stemming from a monthslong armed standoff with U.S. marshals in 2007 over a tax evasion conviction that led to the discovery of explosives and booby traps on his property.

NPR

President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden debate for the first time tonight, Tuesday, Sept. 29. It's the first of three presidential debates and it's moderated by Chris Wallace of Fox News. NHPR will broadcast live coverage of the debate, which starts at 9 p.m.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Parts of New Hampshire continue to experience extreme drought conditions. The state has put a ban on campfires near public woodlands in response, and well drilling companies are overwhelmed with calls.

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

Editor's note: This story was updated to reflect changes UNH made, after this piece was first published, to how it publicized the absentee voting events.

University of New Hampshire students will be able to register and vote absentee on campus in October. It's part of a strategy to cut down on crowding and long lines at Durham's polling place, which is often one of the busiest in the state during high-turnout elections. 

via YouTube

Outside spending has started to pour into the race for New Hampshire governor. It comes as Gov. Chris Sununu enjoys a large cash advantage over Democratic rival Dan Feltes.

Chris Cantwell sits facing camera wearing black t-shirt.
A still from Vice News "Charlottesville: Race and Terror"

A federal jury delivered a guilty verdict Monday to a prominent white supremacist from Keene accused of making online threats against another neo-Nazi.

Jurors found Christopher Cantwell guilty of criminal threatening and extortion after he threatened to rape the wife of a man who he believed had been harassing him online. 

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Sean Hurley for NHPR

Two people died while out on trails in the White Mountains this weekend.

A man from Massachusetts was climbing at Rumney Rocks when his equipment malfunctioned during a descent and he fell more than 50 feet to the ground. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

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Another man died Saturday evening after falling from Arethusa Falls in Livermore, near Crawford Notch.

Michael Casey / AP

New Hampshire will offer a new federal grant program to rehabilitate some of its dozens of so-called “high hazard” dams – ones that would threaten life and property if they failed.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency launched the program this year, giving New Hampshire close to half a million dollars to give to towns, nonprofits and dam owners.

Ali Oshinskie for NHPR

A few weeks ago, Liza Widdop and her kids visited Concord. 

Arriving from out of state, they walked around the neighborhoods, trying to find their next home. But with no ‘For Sale’ signs in sight, they tried something unusual: They left letters at potential new homes, instead.

Google Earth

The Environmental Protection Agency has approved a new ocean dumping site for dredged material just off the Seacoast, after a years-long permitting process.

The site is in federal waters past the Isles of Shoals, about 14 miles directly east of Wallis Sands State Beach. It covers a circle just over a mile and a half in diameter, in water about 300 feet deep.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Several hundred people gathered in Concord Friday evening in a peaceful protest to honor Breonna Taylor, the woman shot to death by police officers in her Louisville, Kentucky home last spring. The gathering on the steps of the New Hampshire Supreme Court, organized by local chapters of Black Lives Matter, was treated as both a call to action and a solemn vigil.  

CDC

New Hampshire identified its first case of COVID-19 on March 2. NHPR has been tracking new developments since then, as the number of confirmed cases and testing capacity — at public and private labs — has expanded.

Opioids container.
NHPR Photo

  A new report for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services shows a lot more people could be getting help from the opioid overdose reversal drug Narcan, but states are rarely using Medicaid to cover it.

The findings show that 5 percent of narcan treatments in the U.S. are covered by Medicaid. This trend holds true in New Hampshire, which has some of the highest overdose death rates in the country. Bahar Adili helped write the report.

NH Forest Rangers / Twitter

New Hampshire is taking the rare step of banning most campfires and smoking near public woodlands to prevent forest fires as drought conditions get worse.

The new ban prohibits the burning of debris on public property, as well as most kinds of campfires. Also banned are the smoking of pipes, cigars or cigarettes on or near public woodlands and trails.

Taylor Quimby

This week, during their highly anticipated “Battery Day” event, Tesla CEO Elon Musk laid out the company’s plan to have a $25,000 electric vehicle on the market within three years. He also mentioned that the company will be breaking into the lithium mining business.

 

Experts are skeptical. But why?

James Cridland, https://bit.ly/2DRn1mT

To become a more inclusive movement, environmentalists are re-examining the past. Today on Outside/In, part two of our series looking back at the environmental movement's problematic anxiety around "overpopulation." 

 

Because when people talk about overpopulation … what are they really talking about? 

 

 

The oppression of Black Americans has always been, to a certain extent, physical. Slavery, segregation and police violence represent just a few of the ways society has regulated Black bodies to maintain white dominance.

This weekend at the Black New England Conference, panelists will gather for a discussion on how women's resistance to this kind of oppression engages both body and spirit. Courtney Marshall, teacher at Phillips Exeter Academy, is one of the panelists and she spoke this week with NHPR's Peter Biello.

WebEx Screenshot

The November election is front and center on a lot of people's minds right now — not least of all because President Trump has recently declined to commit to a peaceful transition of power if he loses the election. He has also, without evidence, questioned the legitimacy of the election itself.

But here in New Hampshire, there's another battle playing out in court that could have ramifications for how and when voters cast their ballots in November, and how those ballots are counted.

Marko Kivela

This episode of Something Wild was produced by Andrew Parrella:

The number of acorns a tree produces in a given year has to do with masting. Not mast like on tall ships, but mast as in masticate, or to chew and it refers to the fruit, seeds or nuts that trees produce and are in turn fodder for animals. Especially in New Hampshire, oak mast follows a boom or bust cycle, which means the amount of acorns varies from year to year. Over time, evolution has favored the oak trees that demonstrate this boom or bust cycle.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being remembered in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol, where she will lie in state in Statuary Hall. Watch the ceremony.

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Some long-term care facilities are slowly reopening to allow visits from family members, recognizing that residents have been suffering both emotionally and physically after months of isolation.  The facilities have been doing so according to guidelines released recently by the state, as well as by federal authorities. 

Still, it can be a precarious balancing act: Allowing more people in – especially when adequate testing is lacking – can mean introducing the virus.  

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The governor’s economic reopening task force unanimously approved Thursday a recommendation that would give New Hampshire stores the option to operate at full capacity, as well as new guidelines for the state's ski areas.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Part of New Hampshire has entered an extreme drought for only the second time in 20 years.

The extreme conditions center on the Dover area and extend in a circle from Great Bay, to near Concord, up to the Lakes Region.

The rest of the state is in severe drought, with moderate conditions in the Upper Valley and Monadnock Valley. 

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

The New Hampshire Supreme Court heard arguments on Thursday in the latest case over whether the state is meeting its constitutional obligation to pay for an adequate education.

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