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The State Department tells Americans to leave Russia immediately

Aeroflot's passenger planes are parked at Sheremetyevo airport, outside Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday. Aeroflot said Monday that it suspended flights to New York, Washington, Miami and Los Angeles through Wednesday because Canada has closed its airspace to Russian planes.
Pavel Golovkin
/
AP
Aeroflot's passenger planes are parked at Sheremetyevo airport, outside Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday. Aeroflot said Monday that it suspended flights to New York, Washington, Miami and Los Angeles through Wednesday because Canada has closed its airspace to Russian planes.

The U.S. State Department is telling U.S. citizens in Russia to leave the country "immediately."

The new travel advisory was issued Saturday over heightened security concerns in the country as Russian military forces carry out an "unprovoked and unjustified attack" in Ukraine, the State Department said.

The alert warned of "the potential for harassment against U.S. citizens by Russian government security officials, the Embassy's limited ability to assist U.S. citizens in Russia, COVID-19 and related entry restrictions, terrorism, limited flights into and out of Russia, and the arbitrary enforcement of local law. U.S. citizens should depart Russia immediately.

"As foreigners make plans to exit the country, the State Department noted a growing number of flight cancellations into and out of Russia, reports of cash shortages, and that "some credit and debit cards may be declined as a result of sanctions imposed on Russian banks."

The State Department's prior travel advisory, issued on Friday, said American citizens should "consider" departing Russia immediately through the available commercial options. On Feb. 28, U.S. officials allowed the voluntary departure of non-emergency staff at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow and their family members.

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