Outside/In | New Hampshire Public Radio

Outside/In

Credit Photo: Greta Rybus / NHPR

A show about the natural world and how we use it. Hosted by Sam Evans-Brown.

Visit the Outside/In website to learn about the show and get extra content. Subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

What does Outside/In sound like? Check out this short podcast trailer:

James Cridland, https://bit.ly/2DRn1mT

To become a more inclusive movement, environmentalists are re-examining the past. Today on Outside/In, we’re talking about how history is and isn’t remembered, and we’re looking back at a problematic topic that, in environmental circles, used to loom larger than stopping nukes and saving whales: over-population. 

 

But when people talk about over-population … what are they really talking about? 

The open world environment of Skyrim is beautiful, and one of the most celebrated video game landscapes of all time. But an imagined world can be transformative ... and contain ideas about nature that are quite real.

Nick Mott

When the debate over drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge first emerged, most people had never heard of global warming. So over the last four decades, the controversies over oil in the Refuge and climate change evolved on different tracks.

Now, those tracks are intersecting. In the final episode of The Refuge miniseries -- a dive into the resulting tensions and contradictions around oil and climate.

For the month of August, Outside/In is featuring Refuge, a four-part Peabody award-winning documentary series from Threshold. This is part four.

Carbon Engineering

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam."

Nick Mott

The Threshold team visits Kaktovik, Alaska, the only town within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, to find out how the conflict over drilling for oil in the refuge feels to the people who live there. But the heart of the issue isn’t just over oil extraction and development, wilderness and wildlife. Whatever side people took, their focus is on their community, sovereignty, and survival.

For the month of August, Outside/In is featuring Refuge, a four-part Peabody award-winning documentary series from Threshold.

Nick Mott

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge began as a bold vision to preserve enough land to sustain a whole web of Arctic animals. Today, these 19 million roadless acres are home to moose and caribou, wolves and foxes, and birds that fly in from around the world to nest. Polar bears are using the coastal areas as a true refuge as the world warms and the sea ice retreats.

But shortly after ANWR was created, an enormous oil deposit was discovered nearby, and a different vision for the far north took hold.

For the month of August, Outside/In is featuring Refuge, a four-part Peabody award-winning documentary series from Threshold. This is part one.

Are snow-making machines an example of climate adaptation, or an example of an emissions feedback loop? Does the fire risk posed by planting trees outweigh the benefits of their use as a carbon sink? Can the team talk big planet problems and still leave room for bad puns?

We’ll answer these questions and more climate queries on this special edition of Ask Sam.

Mass. Office of Energy and Environment Affairs

Over forty years since the release of the film Jaws, sharks are returning to Cape Cod. But the fear and the narrative around the danger of sharks could be changing.

This episode was originally published in 2019.

https://flic.kr/p/5Dr6fa / Flicker CC

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Kevin Gibbs, https://bit.ly/3eDwJW8

Ever since the threat of climate change was first made public, scientists have offered the possibility of a get-out-of-jail-free card: geoengineering. Reducing emissions is hard, so why not just engineer the Earth's atmosphere more to our liking?  Decades later, the science of geoengineering is still in its infancy, but a growing number of researchers are trying to change that. Should they?

Reverend Don Ruggles, courtesy Chisasibi Heritage & Cultural Centre.

On July 6, a federal judge ordered the shutdown of the Dakota Access Pipeline -- a victory for the resistance movement led by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

But pull on the thread of this moment and you'll find it’s connected to a long and complicated history, of treaties made, kept, and violated, as well as the Supreme Court decisions that constitute so-called “native law."

A story about crickets that isn't actually about crickets at all.

There’s a tendency to think of “the natural world” as everything beyond the asphalt. But soil often lies just a couple inches below the concrete, and the design of our cities represents choices about how much space we give to “built environment” and how much we give to “grown environment" -- and specifically, to trees.

 

Denis Kuschter, https://bit.ly/2YbohbO

For months, producer Taylor Quimby has been trying to craft a story about spicy peppers. Every one of his pitches has been shot down…until now. On this episode of Outside/In, a culinary challenge in which four producers argue about which seed-bearing delicacy is the ABSOLUTE best.

Design by Chelsea Connor and Sheridan Alford

Outside/In is a show about the natural world and how we use it – but access to nature is not equal.

Pascal Terjan, https://bit.ly/2Tajgxg

On this show, the urban evolution of pigeons, the magic of kettle bogs, and what to do if you've been bitten by a tick. 

Massive solar flares, mental health in the time of coronavirus and all the time, and taking a deep breath about "murder hornets."

Taylor Quimby

With so many of our favorite outdoor activities currently off-limits, we’re looking for accessible ways to explore the magic of nature from the safety of our homes and neighborhoods. This is the first in a series of short episodes for families and individuals who want to discover how, even when we’re stuck inside, the natural world ties us together.

Courtesy Emily Atkin

The overlap of COVID-19 and the climate crisis, a critique of Tiger King, and a deeper look at the phenomenon of big cat ownership in the United States.

The Illustrated Shooting and Dramatic News

On this week's Outside/In, Sam digs into a (shockingly controversial) debate over the now-extinct passenger pigeon, and its reputedly gargantuan flocks. Also: we debunk (and demystify) some coronavirus-related fake news about wildlife.

Listen to the program:

Tune into NHPR this Saturday for a special marathon edition of Outside/In - NHPR’s podcast and program about the natural world and how we use it. For four hours, we’ll be taking a look back – and providing updates – to some of the most popular and intriguing stories that have run since the podcast first launched in December 2015.

The special broadcast will air from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, December 28.

Outside/In Host Sam Evans-Brown shares the hourly lineup, below:

BRICKY CEMENT / FLICKR/CC

The Outside/In team demystifies cap-and-trade programs in the Northeast.

The Executive Council is a peculiar New Hampshire institution made up of five “citizen” councilors that, together with the governor, make up the executive branch. Why do we have one? And how does it work?

 

Then, overpopulation was one of the biggest environmental issues of the 60s and 70s, arguably bigger than saving the whales, planting trees, and acid rain. But then it seemed to disappear from the conversation.

What's That Sound?

May 17, 2019

When workers at the American embassy Cuba claimed to have been attacked by a mysterious weapon that left no trace, it led to a major shift in American diplomacy toward the Caribbean socialist state. But the story has also led to a split in journalism, stemming from the sources different kinds of journalists rely on. Today, a story of weapons, nature, and truth from Outside/In.

Civics 101: New Hampshire, our local look at how state government works, brings us a look at the governor. Not our current governor specifically, but the office of the governor itself. What does the NH state governor do? And what makes our governor position different than in other states?

Then, a thought experiment: How fast could people go before the combustion engine and other technologies drastically increased the speed of the human race? And how did they pull it off?

There's only one place in the world that you can find the axolotl—the Mexican salamander—in the wild. This creature is the living embodiment of the Aztec god of heavenly fire, of lightning and the underworld.But the wild axolotl’s fate might be bound to the Aztecs by more than myth in a story from Outside/In.

Then, the Executive Council. What is it? Why do we have it? And what does it do?

The Complicated History Of The Overpopulation Debate

Nov 27, 2018
Sara Plourde; NHPR

Population growth has been a concern for environmentalists, and other interest groups, for more than a century. But the anxiety over the loss of space, and resources, as a result of human growth and consumption, is not simple. We talk with Sam Evans-Brown, host of Outside/In, NHPR's podcast about the natural world and how we use it, about his two-part show on the history of the anxiety of overpopulation. 

Listen to the episodes of Outside/In on overpopulation here


You're Family Now

Nov 23, 2018

In June 1981, a bodybuilder, a stockbroker, and 10 other men entered the woods of New Hampshire to settle an argument. They called it "The First Annual Survival Game," and the details are the stuff of legend... even if they aren't all true. Then, what happens to your leaves after you rake them up and put them on the curb? And another story in our continuing series on vanity plates, this one a story far more complex than a license plate can capture.

Sara Plourde; NHPR

We sit down with Taylor Quimby, senior producer of Outside/In, NHPR's show about the natural world and how we use it, to talk about the latest episode, "The Meat Matrix." In the episode, Quimby spent time with a listener who gives frequent feedback to the station about her vegan advocacy; he also explored the world of vegan activism and what some call "the meat matrix." Listen to the episode of Outside/In here

Seeing Double

Nov 9, 2018
Jacqui Helbert

Today on Word of Mouth, we're digging in to the fraught relationship between the gear industry and gender with Outside/In. When do women actually need something different and when are companies just looking to make more money by selling women a product that is essentially the same thing... but smaller and pink? And what do you do if the available products - pink or not -  don't fit your body at all?

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