voting

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A New Hampshire man has been accused of voting in that state and in Massachusetts during the November 2016 general election.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

New Hampshire is a step closer to having its legislative districts drawn by an independent commission, rather than by lawmakers.

On Thursday, the state Senate passed a bipartisan bill that would create a 15-member public body to draw legislative maps.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire Democrats are looking for help from their party's presidential candidates in overturning a law they claim will make it harder for some college students to vote.

At campaign events across the state, White House hopefuls are being pressed to speak out against the 2018 law. It subjects college students who come from other states to residency requirements such as getting a New Hampshire driver's license if they study and vote in the state.

Senate Takes Up Bill To Expand Absentee Voting in N.H.

Apr 24, 2019
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A measure that would expand the availability of absentee voting hit the state Senate Wednesday.

 

Currently voters who want to cast an absentee ballot have to meet certain criteria, like having a disability or an employment obligation.

josh rogers /nhpr

 

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner is taking aim at two bills backed by Democrats to rollback laws passed by Republicans in recent years.

One would eliminate new steps in the voter registration process.

Another bill aims to make it easier for transient populations, like college students and members of the military, to vote here without running afoul of other state laws.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Democrats in the New Hampshire Senate have voted through a bill to exempt college students and members of the military from having to register their cars in New Hampshire if they vote here. The bill was one of several party line votes on bills governing elections.

The bill would blunt a key provision in a GOP-backed law enacted last year, which required all people voting in state elections to register their cars here and get New Hampshire drivers licenses.

There are nearly 60 election-related bills in the New Hampshire legislature this session, many of which reflect national conversations around election issues.  The Exchange discussed redistricting and voting technology with Casey McDermott, NHPR's reporter covering politics and policy, and Jessica Huseman, election reporter from Politico.  

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In the first legislative session after the midterm elections, New Hampshire, like other states, has introduced a number of measures to improve voting security, ballot access, and redistricting. What do voting-related bills in New Hampshire and nationwide say about the biggest concerns surrounding our election system?

Lara Bricker for NHPR

New Hampshire lawmakers considered a bill in Concord Wednesday that would give municipalities more flexibility in the timing of elections. After two years straight of significant snowstorms on town election day, many moderators throughout the state called for a postponement provision, citing transportation concerns.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  A University of New Hampshire student has pleaded guilty to putting false information on a voter registration form. Spencer McKinnon, 21, was sentenced Feb. 28 based on the Class A misdemeanor charge of wrongful voting.

 

The New Hampshire Attorney General’s office says McKinnon has also agreed to cooperate in an investigation into alleged voter coercion.

 

Rebecca Lavoie for NHPR

A controversial New Hampshire voting law set to take effect in July is now facing a legal challenge from the ACLU.

In a complaint filed Wednesday in federal district court, the ACLU claims the law, House Bill 1264, unconstitutionally limits the student vote. (Read the suit here.)

Lauren Chooljian / NHPR

 

New Hampshire voters wouldn't have to pick just one candidate in the state's first-in-the-nation presidential primary next year if lawmakers pass a bill to create a ranked-choice voting system.

Maine became the first state to conduct a federal general election using ranked-choice voting in November, and now several other states are considering the same. The system allows voters to rank candidates from first to last on their ballots. If no candidate wins a majority, last-place candidates are eliminated and their votes are reallocated.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire Democrats who objected to what they viewed as voter suppression legislation are proposing new bills aimed at expanding voter turnout.

The House Election Law Committee held public hearings Tuesday on two constitutional amendments: One would allow 17-year-olds to vote in primaries if they will turn 18 by the date of the general election; the other would make absentee ballots available to all voters, not just those who fit certain circumstances.

It’s the last show of the year and thus a time to look back on where we’ve been and the stories we’ve shared. Word of Mouth producers celebrate the work they loved and the stories that stuck with them from producers and reporters around NHPR.

Favorites Mentioned In This Episode

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Newly empowered Democrats are hoping to reverse two recent changes to New Hampshire's election laws before either fully takes effect.

Annie Ropeik photos

New Hampshire Public Radio covered hundreds of stories in 2018. Some features captured how Granite Staters live and work. The opioid addiction crisis continued to make headlines - and claim lives. And political currents ran strong.

A Florida man is facing charges that he voted illegally in Hooksett during the 2016 general election.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State attorneys fielded 185 calls to their Election Day hotline this week — ranging from traffic complaints to registration questions to problems with voting equipment — but most complaints were resolved without the need for any formal investigation.

Your New Hampshire Voting Questions: Answered

Nov 6, 2018
Allegra Boverman; NHPR

Tuesday is midterm day, and there is still a lot of confusion surrounding who can vote, what you need to bring to the polls, and whether voting legislation like SB3 will impact you. We'll answer these questions on-air, and hear about Spanish-language resources for voters and a forum for transgender voters. 


Casey McDermott, NHPR

The midterm elections might seem like a national event. But in reality, the election process is a decidedly local affair. That’s especially true in New Hampshire, where voting is run at the town level.

Volunteers from both parties are working to get high school and college-age voters to the polls on Tuesday.

High schools tend to host voter registration drives in the spring, when more seniors have turned eighteen, but some schools are making sure eligible high schoolers are ready to vote tomorrow.

Prescott Herzog, sophomore at Stevens High School in Claremont and president of High School Democrats of America, says his group of high school Democrats is working to ensure all 18-year olds at the school, regardless of their politics, head to the polls.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The election process has been in the limelight across the country. On Friday morning, New Hampshire's top election officials gathered to send a strong message that the state's voting systems can be trusted.

Attorney General Gordon MacDonald reiterated that despite some recent court rulings and changes this year to the voter registration process, the state is on track for a smooth election.

"New Hampshire has a long history of running elections that are fair, well-run, and a very high degree of voter participation,” MacDonald said.

Miosotis Cora

Para leer esta historia en espanol, haga clic aqui, y haga clic aqui para recursos para votantes. 

New Hampshire’s Latino population is small, just around 4 percent. Still, in some areas, Spanish-speaking communities have grown steadily in recent years. In Nashua, many Latino voters are looking forward to participating in next week’s midterms. But some are finding it a challenge to get the information they need.  

Miosotis Cora

Para un manual basico sobre las elecciones, haga clic para leerlo en español.

En New Hampshire, la población latina es 4 por ciento de todo el estado. Pero la comunidad ha crecido poco a poco. En Nashua, hay votantes latinos que quieren participar en las elecciones de la próxima semana pero algunos tienen dificultades al encontrar la información que necesitan.

ACLU of New Hampshire on Facebook

Palana Belken knows from firsthand experience that trying to navigate the voter registration process can sometimes be daunting if you identify as transgender.

Daniela Allee

New Hampshire prides itself on having a volunteer, citizen legislature. But the legislators writing laws for the rest of the state are older, whiter, and disproportionately male compared to the state's population.

Factions inside the Democratic and Republican parties are trying to change that, here and across the country. This week on Word of Mouth, we get inside that effort. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A hearing to sort out voter registration rules for the upcoming midterms is scheduled for 2 p.m. at Hillsborough County Superior Court in Manchester.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

With just over two weeks to go until voters head to the polls, a judge has blocked the state from using new voter registration regulations that require voters to prove they live where they're trying to vote. Instead, the judge says the state needs to switch back to the registration forms used in 2016.

Daniela Allee / NHPR

About 15 people in Concord learned how to use voting technology for the visually impaired at FutureInSight, a local non-profit.

The system, called One4All, was first used in the 2016 state primary.

It's tablet-based. There's a keyboard and voice output that reads through the candidates. Voters hit "enter" on a keyboard to pick their candidate.

This year's system has a few small tweaks: the voice output is clearer and a bit faster, for one thing.

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