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voting

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Originalmente escrito en inglés por Kelly Burch de Granite State News Collaborative, traducido al español por María Aguirre. 

Este año, todos los votantes elegibles en New Hampshire pueden registrarse mediante el correo. Pero, los votantes deben solicitar sus papeletas de ausencia y votos ausentes con tiempo para ayudar al estado a lidiar con el incremento anticipado de votos remotos. 

“Los votantes realmente podrían ayudar si actúan temprano", dijo en inglés David Scanlan, el secretario adjunto del estado. “Regístrense antes de la elección", fue su sugerencia. 

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire's pollworkers will be outfitted with masks, face shields, gloves and gowns for the September primary and November general election — but local officials will need to reuse some of those items, including face masks, in both elections, according to new guidance from the Secretary of State.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Any eligible New Hampshire voter who wants to cast an absentee ballot can do so this fall due to COVID-19 — and election officials across the state are preparing to process a potentially massive increase in absentee ballot requests in the months ahead.

The electoral college has been called “complicated and confusing.” But our Civics 101 Shorts series eat “complicated and confusing” for breakfast! This episode explores what the electoral college is, why we have it, and how it works.

 

NHPR

The state of New Hampshire has laid out the process for people to register by mail to vote in this fall’s elections.

Under the state’s guidance, to register by mail, a prospective voter would request an absentee voter packet from their city or town clerk or from the New Hampshire Secretary of State.

US Census Bureau

Every ten years the United States government tries to count every person in the country with a census. What is the census? Why does the government need to count people? Who is it doing the counting? Today’s Civics Short, designed for middle schoolers but fun for all, takes a closer look at the who, what, where, and whys of the Census.

Zoom Screenshot

In New Hampshire, elections are largely an in-person event, but it's hard to socially distance at a polling place. And many poll workers and voters are trying to figure out how to conduct elections safely during the COVID-19 crisis. 

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner has assembled a six-person "select committee" to advise his office on how to spend the $3.2 million in emergency election funding the state has received as part of a recent federal COVID-19 relief package. 

This story originally published when the state issued its first memo on COVID-19 election rules, on April 10. It was updated April 17 with additional information state election officials provided on the state's absentee voter registration process.

After postponing their annual school district meeting due to COVID-19, the Bow School District will now hold their meeting virtually next week, allowing townspeople to call in to the meeting, submit comments and concerns via email, and ultimately vote directly from their cars. 

James Hatem is the school district moderator for the town of Bow. He spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello earlier today to tell him more about how the town has adapted their annual meeting to comply with the state’s social distancing guidelines.

Allegra Boverman/for NHPR

The New Hampshire House has voted to allow people to register to vote when they get or renew a driver’s license.

Allegra Boverman | NHPR

Editor's note: This post was updated on Feb. 27 to reflect newly released election data.

After a messy caucus in Iowa last week, the pressure was on for New Hampshire to avoid making any serious mistakes in Tuesday's presidential primary. And for the most part, it seems like New Hampshire succeeded.

Allegra Boverman | NHPR

Thousands of people went to the polls yesterday to vote in New Hampshire's first in the nation primary.

Charles Cooper wasn't one of them.

In the past few months, many of the candidates running for the Democratic presidential nomination  have passed through the studios of New Hampshire Public Radio, on the top floor of an office building in Concord.

On their way to the elevator, they had to pass by the Pillsbury Cafe and Pantry, owned by Cooper and his wife Jill.

Allegra Boverman | NHPR

It wasn’t just the election results in New Hampshire that were under the spotlight on Tuesday - it was also the process itself. That’s in large part because of what happened a little more than a week ago in Iowa, where that state’s Democratic caucus collapsed in spectacular fashion.

By all accounts, New Hampshire’s 6,000 local and state election officials - many of them elected by their own communities - helped pull off a relatively smooth Primary Day.

Sean Hurley

18 year-old Elisabeth Roadcap is a senior at Milford High.  On Tuesday -- New Hampshire Primary Day -- she voted for the first time in a national election. NHPR’s Sean Hurley has followed Elisabeth’s effort to find a favorite candidate - and spoke with her three weeks ago, met with her again four days ago, and was with her today as she cast her very first vote.   

Editor's note: We highly recommend listening to this story

  

A recent NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll found that 41% percent of Americans "do not think the country is prepared to protect the U.S. election system from attack," says NPR's Pam Fessler.  How are federal and local officials working to secure our elections? We discuss with Fessler, and  NHPR's Casey McDermott, who covers election security and voting in N.H.  

Original air date: Monday, February 3, 2020.

Allie Gutierrez for NHPR

New Hampshire Public Radio covered thousands of stories in 2019. Some stories offered closure, while others still await a final chapter.

Todd Bookman for NHPR

Two college students who are suing the state over its new voter registration rules took the stand on Thursday as part of an ongoing trial over the future of the law behind them. While both students said they found the law confusing, both acknowledged that it did not prevent them from registering to vote.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

If you're a New Hampshire voter who plans to participate in the 2020 presidential primary, you’ll want to double check your party registration this week. This Friday, Oct. 25, is the last day to make any changes to your party registration before the election. 

State offices that oversee elections and motor vehicle laws have declined to explain what implications, if any, New Hampshire’s new residency standards would have on licensing requirements. That’s despite growing confusion over whether the law could require voters to obtain in-state drivers licenses after casting a ballot.   

While the state has not said definitively that people who vote in New Hampshire would have to get a New Hampshire drivers license under the new law, there are ways to measure how many people could be affected if this turns out to be the case.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

New Hampshire is heading into a busy election season, with municipal contests in November, and the first-in-the-nation presidential primary not far behind. This is the first election season since a new law went into effect that redefined the state’s residency standards.

Supporters have said that the law would bring clarity to New Hampshire’s voting rules, but it’s facing a court challenge from the ACLU and the New Hampshire Democratic Party, who say it will discourage otherwise qualified people from voting.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu has vetoed a bill that would have expanded absentee voting in New Hampshire.

State law now only allows people to vote by absentee ballot in limited circumstances, such as a work or caregiving obligation, or if a voter will be out of town on election day.

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

A New Hampshire man has been accused of voting in that state and in Massachusetts during the November 2016 general election.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

New Hampshire is a step closer to having its legislative districts drawn by an independent commission, rather than by lawmakers.

On Thursday, the state Senate passed a bipartisan bill that would create a 15-member public body to draw legislative maps.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire Democrats are looking for help from their party's presidential candidates in overturning a law they claim will make it harder for some college students to vote.

At campaign events across the state, White House hopefuls are being pressed to speak out against the 2018 law. It subjects college students who come from other states to residency requirements such as getting a New Hampshire driver's license if they study and vote in the state.

Senate Takes Up Bill To Expand Absentee Voting in N.H.

Apr 24, 2019
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A measure that would expand the availability of absentee voting hit the state Senate Wednesday.

 

Currently voters who want to cast an absentee ballot have to meet certain criteria, like having a disability or an employment obligation.

josh rogers /nhpr

 

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner is taking aim at two bills backed by Democrats to rollback laws passed by Republicans in recent years.

One would eliminate new steps in the voter registration process.

Another bill aims to make it easier for transient populations, like college students and members of the military, to vote here without running afoul of other state laws.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Democrats in the New Hampshire Senate have voted through a bill to exempt college students and members of the military from having to register their cars in New Hampshire if they vote here. The bill was one of several party line votes on bills governing elections.

The bill would blunt a key provision in a GOP-backed law enacted last year, which required all people voting in state elections to register their cars here and get New Hampshire drivers licenses.

There are nearly 60 election-related bills in the New Hampshire legislature this session, many of which reflect national conversations around election issues.  The Exchange discussed redistricting and voting technology with Casey McDermott, NHPR's reporter covering politics and policy, and Jessica Huseman, election reporter from Politico.  

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In the first legislative session after the midterm elections, New Hampshire, like other states, has introduced a number of measures to improve voting security, ballot access, and redistricting. What do voting-related bills in New Hampshire and nationwide say about the biggest concerns surrounding our election system?

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