NHPR

Courtesy of WNYC

Jim Schachter will take over as CEO of New Hampshire Public Radio, the station announced Monday, succeeding former chief executive Betsy Gardella, who resigned abruptly last October.

Schachter previously held the top news executive position at WNYC, the country’s largest public media station. In his role there, he oversaw programs including On the Media, The Brian Lehrer Show and Radio Rookies. Before joining WNYC, Schachter spent nearly 17 years at the New York Times, where he held the position of associate managing editor. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Earlier today, NHPR announced the retirement of Betsy Gardella, the station's president and CEO, effective at the end of this year. Gardella has led the station for 13 years and in a statement the board of trustees praised her for her contributions. NHPR's Todd Bookman is reporting on this as part of an independent reporting team at NHPR. And he joined All Things Considered host Peter Biello to discuss the news.

Betsy Gardella, who has led New Hampshire Public Radio since 2005 as President and CEO, says she will retire from the organization at the end of the year.

(Click here to listen to Todd Bookman talk about this story with All Things Considered host Peter Biello, including how NHPR set up an independent reporting team to cover it.)

The announcement comes after “serious management, human resources and communication issues” were identified by independent investigators brought in by the station’s Board of Trustees following complaints from employees. NHPR Board of Trustees Chair Marshall Rowe notified staff of that investigation in an email in late May.

We’d like to take a moment to remember former NHPR President and General Manager Mark Handley, who died recently after battling cancer. Handley will be remembered as the leader who transformed NHPR into a statewide network.

As NHPR’s archive intern this summer, my primary responsibility has been to listen back to some of the station’s oldest audio. I take copious notes about the stories I hear – and when I find one especially interesting, it gets shared on our blog.

Summer Storms Disturb Radio Waves

Jun 30, 2014
Wolfgang Staudt via Flickr cc

  On June 10, a listener in Danville, IL picked up 90 seconds of NHPR signal. A station’s radio wave “footprint”, or estimated range, is generally considered to extend only about as far as the eye can see from the point of the antenna, but Danville is just under a thousand miles away. It would take more than a good pair of binoculars to put Danville within range of sight; so how did this happen?

Amateur radio enthusiasts, known as “DXers”, describe what our listener caught a glimpse of as an “E-Skip”.

To understand what that is you need to head way up into the air.

NHPR's Health Reporter Todd Bookman was awarded second place in the 2013 Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism by the Association of Health Care Journalists. The organization recognized Todd's series Planning For The End: A Look At Advance Directives in the small market Consumer/Feature category.

Here are the stories that got the most attention on NHPR.org last week. Did you miss them? Click below to read or listen!

1. USDA Airdrops Vanilla Flavored Rabies Vaccines Over Eastern Forests

2. Across The River, Vermont Puts Its Money On Local Food