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Coronavirus Update: 10 deaths, 7,271 new infections in N.H.

Coronavirus updates for New Hampshire
Casey McDermott
/
NHPR
Coronavirus updates for New Hampshire

NHPR is continuing to cover the developing story around coronavirus in New Hampshire. Bookmark this page for the latest updates, including case numbers and other important news of the day.

Stay in the know: Sign up for NHPR's The Rundown newsletter

THE LATEST NUMBERS IN N.H.

Scroll down for more COVID-19 news and the latest updates.

The most recent update from the N.H. Department of Health and Human Services on Jan. 24:

  • 10 new deaths
  • 7,271 new cases (6,196 from Friday to Sunday, rest from previous week)
  • 15,641 current cases
  • 411 current hospitalizations
  • 2,145 deaths due to COVID-19
  • NOTE: Our reporting of the ages of newly-reported cases and COVID-19 deaths is a reflection of the state's reporting by age, which you can find right here. The state does not report new figures on holidays.

Support NHPR's award-winning journalism by becoming an NHPR member today.


LIVE BLOG - CORONAVIRUS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE


10 more deaths, new cases spike over weekend
Update: Monday, Jan. 24, 4:57 p.m.

The state today reported 6,196 new coronavirus infections over the past three days, along with another 1,075 cases from the previous week.

Of the new cases, 1,924 are individuals under 18 years old, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.

The estimated number of known active infections dropped to 15,641. There are 411 patients hospitalized with the virus.

An additional 10 Granite Staters have died as a result of COVID-19. The state said the residents who died were from Carroll, Coos, Hillsborough (2), Merrimack (2), Rockingham (2), and Strafford (2) counties.

To date, New Hampshire has recorded 2,145 COVID deaths.

— NHPR Staff

12 deaths, 3,045 new cases
Update: Friday, Jan. 21, 3:45 p.m.

State health officials announced 12 additional COVID-19 deaths and 3,045 new coronavirus cases today.

There are 18,462 active infections and 393 patients hospitalized with the virus.

Of the new cases, 906 are individuals under age 18.

The deaths Jan. 21 are residents of Carroll (2), Cheshire, Hillsborough (3), Merrimack (2), Rockingham (3), and Strafford counties.

— NHPR Staff

Booster shots needed against omicron, CDC studies show

(AP) — Three new U.S. studies offer more evidence that the COVID-19 vaccines are standing up to the omicron variant, at least among people who have gotten booster shots.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the studies Friday. The results echo previous research — including studies in Germany, South Africa, and the United Kingdom.

They found available vaccines are less effective against omicron than they were against earlier versions of the coronavirus. One of the papers found that two doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines offered no significant protection against omicron. Several studies have concluded a booster can significantly improve protection.

— Associated Press

14 deaths, 3,190 new cases
Update: Thursday, Jan. 20, 4:06 p.m.

More than a quarter of a million residents of New Hampshire have now had the coronavirus, according to the latest public health numbers.

The state continues to report high daily new infections. Another 3,190 were announced Thursday, with 2,461 of those from Wednesday alone.

Fourteen additional Granite Staters have died from COVID-19, bringing the total number of virus-related deaths to 2,123.

There are 20,026 active infections and 411 patients currently hospitalized with the virus.

— Dan Tuohy, NHPR

State adds fixed vaccination sites
Update: Wednesday, Jan. 19, 4:52 pm.

As the omicron surge continues in New Hampshire, the state is adding more walk-in fixed COVID vaccination sites.

A new location opened Wednesday in Stratham, next door to the Tailgate Tavern. New sites are also coming in Keene, Concord, Nashua, Manchester and Salem. They will be open for boosters as well as first doses.

The vaccine is also available at hundreds of other locations across the state, like pharmacies and community clinics. Governor Chris Sununu stressed the importance of getting booster shots, as the latest strain of the virus spreads quickly across the state, even in vaccinated people.

“It really makes all the difference in the world of getting back to school or work quickly or being laid up for weeks and weeks on end,” Sununu said.

Around 68 percent of the state’s population is fully vaccinated according to CDC data. Roughly half of those who have been vaccinated are also boosted, according to NHPR estimates.

-Alli Fam, NHPR

24 deaths, 595 new cases
Update: Wednesday, Jan. 19, 3:44 pm.

Dr. Benjamin Chan announced 24 new COVID-19 deaths on Wednesday. The state epidemiologist says New Hampshire is averaging three deaths a day; the overall deaths since the start of the pandemic is now 2,109.

Other COVID numbers Jan. 19 include:

  • 595 new cases from Tuesday
  • 18,986 active infections
  • 410 hospitalizations
  • 22% test positivity rate

The deaths reported are residents from: Belknap, Carroll, Cheshire (4), Hillsborough (4), Merrimack (5), Rockingham (6), and Strafford (3) counties.
— NHPR Staff

US begins offering 1B free COVID tests, but many more needed
Update: Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2:01 p.m.

(AP) For the first time, people across the U.S. can log on to a government website and order free, at-home COVID-19 tests.

But the White House push may do little to ease the omicron surge, and experts say Washington will have to do a lot more to fix the country's long-troubled testing system.

The website, COVIDTests.gov, allows people to order four at-home tests per household and have them delivered by mail. But the tests won't arrive for seven to 12 days, after omicron is expected to peak in many parts of the country.

— Associated Press

6 deaths, surge in new cases
Update: Jan. 18

Six additional residents have died from COVID-19, bringing the state's total virus-related deaths to 2,085.

State health officials announced 12,997 new cases from Friday through Monday, with another 1,413 cases reported from last week.

There are 20,045 active infections and 409 current hospitalizations. three of the six deaths reported Tuesday were from two weeks ago, and only just reported.

— NHPR Staff

COVID deaths and cases are rising again at U.S. nursing homes
Update: Jan. 17

(AP) COVID-19 infections are soaring again at U.S. nursing homes because of the omicron wave, and deaths are climbing too.

That's leading to new restrictions on family visits and a renewed push to get more residents and staff members vaccinated and boosted. Nursing homes were the lethal epicenter of the pandemic early on, before the advent of the vaccines allowed many of them to reopen and welcome visitors again.

Now the highly contagious variant has dealt them a setback. Nursing homes reported about 32,000 COVID-19 cases among residents in the week ending Jan. 9, a nearly sevenfold increase from about a month ago. A total of 645 COVID-19-related deaths were reported during the same week, a 47% increase from a month earlier.

— Associated Press

28 additional deaths reported
Update: Friday, Jan. 14, 3:28 p.m.

There were 28 additional COVID-19 deaths announced Friday, bringing New Hampshire's pandemic-related death toll to 2,079.

State health officials reported 2,374 new cases, with 2,177 of those from Thursday, Jan. 13. Of the new cases, 502 were individuals under 18 years old.

There are 426 patients hospitalized with the virus, and 21,291 active infections.

The deaths reported were residents of Belknap (3), Cheshire (2), Grafton (2), Hillsborough (7), Merrimack (5), and Rockingham (9) counties.

— NHPR Staff

4 fixed testing sites to close due to cold

NH health officials say the state's four fixed testing sites will close Saturday, Jan. 15, due to extreme cold weather. They are expected to reopen Sunday at 9 a.m.

The sites are in Claremont at the River Valley Community College, Manchester at the JFK Coliseum, in Nashua at 25 Crown St., and in Newington at the Fox Run Mall.

Find a PCR test near you
Find Rapid antigen testing locations

— NHPR Staff

19 more COVID deaths as new cases surge
Update: Thursday, Jan. 13, 4:46 pm.

The state reported more than 3,800 new coronavirus cases today, as health officials track the winter surge.

Nineteen additional COVID-19 deaths were also announced.

There are currently 432 patients hospitalized with the virus, and 22,750 active cases statewide.

The new deaths are residents from Belknap, Carroll, Cheshire, Hillsborough (7), Merrimack, Rockingham (4), Strafford (3), and Sullivan counties.

- NHPR Staff

Health officials update guidance
Update: Thursday, Jan. 13, 9:51 a.m.

The rise in omicron cases has led state health officials to update their guidance for facilities that give COVID-19 treatments, like monoclonal antibodies and antiviral pills.

The new guidance tells facilities to prioritize treatments that are more effective against omicron, and not to use the less effective ones.

But, the treatments effective against omicron, some of which are new, are in short supply. That means health care facilities may have to place more limits on who gets the treatment to those who are at the highest risk of developing a severe COVID case.

Dr. Michael McLeod, associate chief clinical officer at Concord Hospital, says the hospital is sorting through a set of criteria to help determine eligibility.

“You do have to put, you know, maybe a 35-year-old person who's overweight and that's their only risk factor up against perhaps the 75 year old who's immunocompromised with diabetes and hypertension. So, you know, you really do need to look at that clinically.”

McLeod says race and ethnicity is not a factor the hospital plans to use to determine eligibility.

READ MORE

— Alli Fam, NHPR

Increase in COVID patients, active cases
Update: Wednesday, Jan. 12, 3:46 p.m.

Current hospitalizations are up again as New Hampshire deals with the omicron coronavirus surge.

There are now 415 patients hospitalized with the virus, an increase of 26 from a day earlier.

State health officials report 2,438 new cases, and New Hampshire is averaging about 2,500 new cases a day over the past week, said Dr. Benjamin Chan, state epidemiologist.

Active infections are also up to 20,458.

Chan says the state is averaging nine to 10 deaths a day over the past week.

— NHPR Staff

Hospitals strategize on how to use limited supply of best treatments for omicron
Updated: 2:20 p.m. Jan. 12

The rise in omicron cases has led state health officials to update their guidance for facilities that give COVID-19 treatments, like monoclonal antibodies and antiviral pills.

The new guidance tells facilities to prioritize treatments that are more effective against omicron, and not to use the less effective ones.

But, the treatments effective against omicron, some of which are new, are in short supply. That means health care facilities may have to place more limits on who gets the treatment to those who are at the highest risk of developing a severe COVID case.

Dr. Michael McLeod, associate chief clinical officer at Concord Hospital says the hospital is sorting through a set of criteria to help determine eligibility.

“You do have to put, you know, maybe a 35-year-old person who's overweight and that's their only risk factor up against perhaps the 75-year-old who's immunocompromised with diabetes and hypertension. So, you know, you really do need to look at that clinically,” he said.

McLeod says race and ethnicity is not a factor the hospital plans to use to determine eligibility.
-Alli Fam, NHPR

"Strike teams" arrive at state nursing homes
Updated: 5:52 p.m. Jan. 11

The first of the state’s so-called “strike teams” have arrived at several New Hampshire nursing homes.

The “strike teams” are effectively short-term healthcare workers paid for with American Rescue plan money.

Funding approved for the out-of-state staff by lawmakers last month totaled $6,000,000, with staff estimated to cost $200-300 per hour. The figure does include administrative costs and expenses like housing. Traveling staff typically make much higher wages than their local coworkers.

The state’s turn to traveling staff comes as nursing homes across New Hampshire face staffing shortages that have pushed them to reduce the number of patients they care for. The drop in patient admissions have meant hospitals are struggling to discharge patients who are ready to leave.

Premier Rehab and Healthcare in Nashua received several traveling staff last week, according to Carolyn Moran, a nurse and director of clinical services at the facility. With the addition of the new staff, Moran said the facility has been able to admit “more patients from the hospitals that we normally admit from.”

Moran said she is working with New Hampshire’s Department of Health and Human Services, which is helping bring in the traveling staff to her facility. While this staffing partnership with the state is new, Moran says the facility has used traveling staff in the past.
-Alli Fam, NHPR

Number of daily new COVID cases goes up
Updated: 5:35 p.m. January 10

New Hampshire is averaging over 2,500 new cases of COVID-19 per day. That’s more than double the number the state was seeing two weeks ago.

All of the state is experiencing high levels of community transmission, which means indoor masking is recommended by the CDC.

The four state run outdoor COVID testing sites, at River Valley Community College in Claremont, the JFK Colosseum in Manchester, St. Joseph Hospital in Nashua, and the Fox Run Mall in Newington will be closed tomorrow, Tuesday, Jan 11, due to the extreme cold.
-Alli Fam, NHPR

The second round of COVID antiviral pills is on the way
Updated: 4:45 p.m. January 10

New Hampshire is imminently awaiting its second round of COVID-19 antiviral treatment pills, says a spokesperson for the state health department.

The first round of the pills, which treat COVID-19 and reduce the risk of hospitalization and death from the virus, came at the end of December. In that round, Pfizer’s antiviral pill, Paxlovid, went to eight New Hampshire Hospitals. No hospital received more than 40 doses.

The pill, which is in very limited supply, is only for those at high risk for a severe case of COVID-19. Another antiviral pill, Molnupiravir, made by Merck, is at a few pharmacies that work with skilled nursing facilities.
-Alli Fam, NHPR

House members notified about potential exposure

Updated: Monday, Jan. 10, 6:00 a.m.

Members of the New Hampshire House were notified this weekend that two people at last week’s House session tested positive for COVID-19.

In a Sunday email to legislators obtained by NHPR, officials said close contacts to the two people were notified separately.

The meeting took place in person at a Manchester hotel’s expo center. All House members received at-home COVID tests ahead of the session but were under no obligation to take them, or report results.

Members were asked to stay home in case of a positive test or any symptoms of illness.

-NHPR Staff

Record high active cases
Update: Friday, Jan. 7, 5:20 p.m.

New Hampshire reported a record high number of active coronavirus cases on Friday, Jan. 7. Amid the omicron surge, there are 15,340 current cases of COVID-19.

The state announced two additional deaths; residents of Cheshire and Rockingham counties.

There are 2,633 new cases, with 651 of them individuals under 18 years old, and 366 current hospitalizations.

- NHPR Staff

N.H. adopts new CDC guidelines on COVID quarantine. What does that look like?

Under the updated New Hampshire guidance, people who test positive for COVID-19 or are exposed to a person in their household who tests positive should quarantine or isolate for five days, rather than the previously recommended 10-day period.

No quarantine is required for those who are exposed to COVID but who are up to date on all their COVID-19 shots. That includes people over the age of 18 who have received a full round of COVID vaccines as well as a booster shot, if eligible. Testing on day five is still recommended for all exposed people regardless of vaccination status.

READ MORE from NHPR's Alli Fam

New cases surging
Update: Jan. 6, 3:21 p.m.

State epidemiologist Benjamin Chan announced four additional COVID-19 deaths and 2,184 new coronavirus cases today.

Over the past week, New Hampshire has averaged 1,500 new cases per day. The test positivity rate is now 20%.

Hospitalizations dropped 10 to 359.

With the greater use of at-home COVID tests, the number of active cases is rising notably. There are nearly 15,000 active infections, as of 9 a.m. Jan. 6.

Gov. Chris Sununu is activating another 100 members of the N.H. National Guard to help local and state health care facilities deal with the pandemic.

— NHPR Staff

NH adopting CDC guidance
Update: Jan. 5, 6:10 p.m.

New Hampshire health officials say they are adopting the CDC's new guidance on shortened quarantine requirements for people who have tested positive for or been exposed to COVID-19.

In December, the CDC shortened its isolation and quarantine times from 10 days to five. It says people who develop symptoms after exposure should get tested immediately and those without symptoms should get tested five days after exposure.

State epidemiologist Benjamin Chan says the state will incorporate this into its guidance for the general public and K-12 schools. The final decision on quarantine protocols, however, will remain up to individual school districts.

The update does not apply to health care facilities and congregant living facilities like nursing homes and jails. The CDC is expected to clarify guidance for those settings and for colleges and universities later this month.

— Sarah Gibson, NHPR

Active infections swell
Update: Jan. 5, 4:22 p.m.

State health officials report 12,149 active coronavirus infections tonight, which is around 3,000 more than a day earlier.

The latest public health update shows 3,149 new cases, with 1,854 of them from Tuesday, and 369 patients hospitalized with the virus.

Nine additional COVID-19 deaths were announced. They are residents of Rockingham (7), Cheshire, and Coos counties.

— NHPR Staff

Things seem grim now. But America's COVID situation could get better in 6-8 weeks

Explore the Data: Tracking COVID-19 in New Hampshire

31 more COVID-19 deaths
Update: Jan. 4, 4:11 p.m.

Thirty-one additional residents have died from COVID-19, as New Hampshire crossed 2,000 deaths since the pandemic began

Dr. Thomas Lydon works at Wentworth-Douglass Hospital in Dover, where two deaths from the virus happened overnight.

“There are eight patients in the ICU who are on ventilators which, when I called this morning, was great because we had 10 yesterday … but I learned two people died overnight, so that is just horrible," Lydon said.

Lydon says at Wentworth-Douglass, COVID-19 hospitalizations have started rising again after falling before holidays.

State health officials on Tuesday reported 1,147 new coronavirus cases, 9,177 active infections, and 381 patients currently hospitalized with the virus.

The deaths are residents from Belknap (3), Carroll (2), Cheshire (3), Grafton, Hillsborough (13), Merrimack (2), Rockingham (4), Strafford (2), and Sullivan counties. Four of the deaths occurred more than two weeks ago, but were just confirmed

Eleven of the deaths were residents under 60 years old.

To date, New Hampshire has recorded 2,004 COVID-19 deaths.

— Alli Fam, NHPR

FDA authorizes a Pfizer booster shot for kids ages 12 to 15
Update: Jan. 3 6:07 p.m.

The Food and Drug Administration has authorized the use of a Pfizer-BioNTech booster in adolescents 12 to 15 years old.

The agency on Monday also shortened the time between the completion of primary vaccination of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine and a booster dose to five months from six.

Finally, the FDA allowed for a third dose of vaccine in immunocompromised children 5 to 11 years of age.

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Rochelle Walensky, must still weigh in with a recommendation on the FDA's announcement before the changes can take effect.

READ MORE from NPR


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