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Those Who Have Borne the Battle

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jdn via flickr creative commons
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During this country's early years, military service was considered the price of citizenship in a free society. Over time, veterans gained in prestige, especially after World War II. Our wars since – some unpopular -- have brought about new attitudes. In his new book, Those Who Have Borne the Battle: A History of America's Wars and Those Who Fought Them, former Dartmouth College President James Wright describes the complicated relationship between this country and its military. 

 

Guest: 

James Wright, former Dartmouth College president and longtime history professor at Dartmouth. The son of a World War II veteran, Wright joined the Marines at age seventeen and served for three years with the First Marine Brigade.  He has been visiting wounded veterans since 2005 and helped establish educational counseling programs for them, earning him recognition from educational, veteran, and service organizations.