Where They Stand

Where They Stand is NHPR's series that takes a closer look at the issues defining the state and national campaigns. These stories and interactive pieces explain how the candidates differ in their records, current positions, and tone across a range of policy topics. We aim to give particular focus to those issues that matter most to New Hampshire voters.

We follow up on Annie Ropeik's reporting on the 2020 Democratic candidates' climate change proposals, and talk about the trends in climate policy discussions, from taxes, to incentives, to new technology, and the improvement of existing infrastructure. We also hear what issues New Hampshire voters think are most important, when it comes to climate change, energy, and the environment. 

Original air date: Tuesday, December 10, 2019. 

College debt and the cost of higher education are major issues of the 2020 presidential primary. Democratic candidates, and President Trump, have announced a variety of plans, such as free public college or student loan forgiveness. We look at the proposals, and the role of higher education issues in this election. 

Original air date: Wednesday, December 4, 2019. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Throughout the presidential primary campaign, voters in New Hampshire have said climate change is one of their top priorities. And even as candidates emphasize the dangers of global warming – and detail their plans to address it – many voters aren't reassured.

NHPR’s Annie Ropeik has more as part of our series “Where They Stand,” which takes a closer look at candidates’ policy proposals. 

Sara Plourde; NHPR

Lowering medical costs and increasing access to care are among the most important issues for many New Hampshire voters.

We examine how the candidates say they will address this, as well as the political context and core ideas within their proposals. 

Find NPR's breakdown of candidate proposals here

Original air date: Monday, November 4, 2019. 

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From Syria to North Korea to Afghanistan, the next president will face huge challenges from abroad.  We find out what the candidates are saying about these issues of global importance -- and why they're not saying more.   

Air Date: Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

 

Drug recovery centers first became a stop on the campaign trail in the 2016 New Hampshire primary, and they’re playing an especially important role this year, as presidential hopefuls unveil their plans to tackle the opioid crisis.

Among the presidential candidates, environmental issues haven’t gotten much play this campaign season.

Here in New Hampshire, that’s not quite the case, especially in the gubernatorial race where issues like Northern Pass, solar and wind energy and high energy costs have helped shape the campaign.

National security has proven to be a pivotal issue in this year's Senate race between Sen. Kelly Ayotte and Gov. Maggie Hassan.

Ayotte, a Republican, has cast herself as a strong advocate for the nation's security, pointing to her record in the Senate. Hassan, a Democrat, has taken some positions that put her at odds with her own party and President Obama.

New Hampshire’s gubernatorial primary is just a few days away, and the top issue for many voters is how to solve the state’s ongoing opioid crisis.

Last week, we took a closer look at some of the economic proposals from the Republicans running for governor. This week, we’re catching up on where the Democratic candidates stand on these issues.

As New Hampshire students head back to school this week, education is on many parents’ minds. And with the gubernatorial primary less than two weeks away, candidates’ positions on these issues could play a major role on voters’ decisions. 

In this year’s governor’s race, the candidates’ views fall largely along party lines, with differences over how much and where to spend money.

If you’ve spent any time following the Republicans running for governor this year, you’ve probably heard plenty of talk about the need to jumpstart New Hampshire’s economy.

It's a rare presidential candidate who tries to use tax policy to win voters' hearts.

But fiscal policy -- and tax reform in particular -- is an issue with the potential to have a real effect on voters’ finances, in their personal budgets or their businesses’ earnings. 

After Bernie Sanders announced his proposal to make college free, college affordability has been front and center in the Democratic primary. When it comes to broad goals, the candidates agree. But as for the best way to get there, that’s where they differ.

This primary season, NHPR is taking a closer look at some of the issues defining the presidential primary races in a series we’re calling Where They Stand. Today, we’re looking at gun control and the Democratic candidates' positions, both past and present.

This primary season, NHPR is taking a closer look at some of the issues defining the presidential primary races through a series we’re calling Where They Stand. Today we’re looking at some of the top foreign policy questions in the Republican primary.

On this subject, while the candidates agree on most issues, there are still differences to be found.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

In this year’s Democratic primary, several candidates have made action on climate change a major part of their campaign. This time around they think it could be a winning issue for them in the general election, and they’re also more comfortable using it to draw distinctions between each other.

File photo by Allegra Boverman for NHPR

If you attend any Republican presidential campaign event these days, you are all but guaranteed to hear a voter ask this:

“What would you do about illegal immigration?”  

At campaign events, house parties and town hall meetings across the state, presidential contenders are being met by potential voters who want to know what they plan to do about the role of money in politics.

And the candidates aren’t shying away from the question.

Democrats have taken aim at Citizens United, the Supreme Court’s 2010 ruling that struck down limits on independent expenditures by corporations and unions.