Sarah Gibson | New Hampshire Public Radio

Sarah Gibson

Reporter

Sarah Gibson joined NHPR's newsroom in 2018. She reports on New Hampshire's southern tier.

Sarah came to New Hampshire from New York City, where she was a producer at WNYC. A graduate of Columbia Journalism School, her stories have appeared on WBAI, Alaska Public Media, and in The Village Voice. Prior to journalism, Sarah worked with non-profits in North Carolina and studied History at Brown University. She grew up in rural Vermont.

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Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc

As the state awaits an announcement from Governor Sununu on schools reopening, New Hampshire mayors say they’re moving forward with plans for next year.

Click or tap here to sign up for NHPR's coronavirus newsletter to get the latest updates.

Mayor Bob Carrier of Dover says he won’t be waiting until the last minute. Instead, he says, local officials have been proactively planning what next year will look like.

Courtesy of VLACS/Facebook

New Hampshire's online public charter school is expanding in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

The Virtual Learning Academy Charter School, known as VLCAS, offers full-time online school to nearly 300 students in New Hampshire, mostly in high school. Approximately another 12,000 high schoolers who are enrolled in their local public schools also take some VLACS classes.

UNH Law

The faculty of the University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law have voted to support the removal of ‘Franklin Pierce’ from the law school’s name.

This comes less than a month after UNH announced it would evaluate the name, in light of concerns raised by students about racism at the school and Franklin Pierce's ties to slavery.

Jason Moon for NHPR

A group of Black, Latino and immigrant business owners and community advocates is calling on Gov. Chris Sununu and lawmakers to direct more COVID-19 relief money to minority communities.

Joe Gratz / flickr, creative commons: https://www.flickr.com/photos/63126465@N00/117048243

A decision by the New Hampshire Supreme Court on how the state funds public education is expected by the end of the year. The court’s decision will be the latest chapter in the decades-long battle over how the state funds its schools.

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Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The University of New Hampshire, Granite State College, Plymouth State University and Keene State College expect to spend nearly $29 million next year on COVID-related expenses.

USNH shared its financial forecast Wednesday with a legislative advisory board to the Governor’s Office For Emergency Relief and Recovery.

Michael Brindley / NHPR

 

A task force convened by the New Hampshire Department of Education to determine how schools should re-open in the fall has sent their final recommendations to Gov. Sununu.

The recommendations emphasize the need to prepare for multiple scenarios next year – including in-person instruction with new safety guidelines, continued remote learning, and the option many states are considering: a hybrid model of remote and in-person instruction.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Over the last month, New Hampshire has seen some of the largest demonstrations in recent memory, with hundreds protesting against police brutality and racial injustice. One of the major forces behind these is a group of Black Lives Matter activists in their early twenties, who’ve known each other for years.

NHPR’s Sarah Gibson caught up with them about what it’s been like to lead this movement.


Sarah Gibson/NHPR

Activists from local Black Lives Matter chapters and other social justice groups from across the state gathered outside the New Hampshire State House on Saturday, calling for an end to systemic racism, white supremacy and police brutality.

The event — billed as a Day of Action and organized largely by young people — included poetry, song and calls for justice for Black Americans killed by police officers. 

Flickr/Ivan Radic

The N.H. Department of Education says districts need to prepare for a hybrid model of remote and in-person learning for the next school year as the pandemic continues.

The hybrid model is one of a list of draft recommendations a state task force is working on to deliver to Gov. Chris Sununu next week.

Kennett High School seniors and their families traveled up a ski mountain in North Conway, N.H., to receive their diplomas.

"Out of all the different types of graduations different high schools are having, I think this is the coolest," says senior Eva Drummond. "It's the Mount Washington Valley and we're known because we have our mountains and our ski areas."

Drummond grew up skiing Cranmore Mountain, but she never expected to go up it in her graduation gown and sneakers.

Michael Brindley / NHPR

The University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law is rethinking its name, in light of concerns raised by students about President Franklin Pierce's opposition to abolition.

In a press release late Friday, the law school announced that it has “begun to evaluate the law school’s name as part of the national conversation around historical and cultural symbols of the past.” It is also developing a task force to recommend ways to promote racial justice and inclusion.

The Executive Council voted Wednesday to deny the nomination of Ryan Terrell to the State Board of Education.

Terrell’s nomination, by Republican Gov. Chris Sununu, was voted down by the Democratic majority on the five-member body, who cited concerns about Terrell’s qualifications. But Terrell, who is black, said the debate “turned into a conversation about race” that discounted his other qualifications.

Courtesy of Enna Grazier

 

The coronavirus pandemic has changed the way many of us do our jobs, including those of us here at NHPR.

Our reporters haven't been able to get out and record your voices as much as usual. So, we've asked people to step in for us - to record their own lives and share how daily life has been interrupted in big and small ways.

Christina Phillips for NHPR

Hundreds of people gathered in Manchester Tuesday night for a peaceful vigil organized by the group Black Lives Matter.

The event came amidst protests and unrest across the country in response to the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25.

U.S. Census Bureau

The U.S. Census Bureau is resuming some of its field operations in New Hampshire this month, after delays caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

New Hampshire is the last New England state for the bureau to resume its activities for the 2020 population count.

Kristy Cardin

The New Hampshire Department of Education is wrapping up a survey it says will help the state plan for re-opening and redesigning schools next fall.

The survey, which has been completed by over 50,000 parents, teachers, and administrators, asks participants to rate how remote learning has gone, and whether families and educators want to head back to school. The goal is to get input to share with a state task force on school reopening and redesign (STRRT).

Courtesy of Jean Ronald Saint Preux

 

Gov. Chris Sununu says the state is "looking into" an arrest last week that was streamed live and circulated widely on social media.

 

The video shows 34-year old Jean Ronald Saint Preux, an African American man, being arrested by two New Hampshire state troopers and pulled out of his car after allegedly resisting arrest.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

An order issued by Gov. Chris Sununu regarding services during the pandemic for students with disabilities is drawing praise from special education advocates and concern from school districts.

The emergency order issued Tuesday clarifies the timeline and requirements for districts to meet the needs of students who get special ed services through an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

CDC

State health officials have confirmed the first case in New Hampshire of an inflammatory syndrome that the CDC says affects children who have been infected with or exposed to the coronavirus.

The syndrome is called COVID-19-associated Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children, or MIS-C. 

Courtesy of Dave Warrender

High school career and technical schools are slowly reopening to students studying for jobs deemed essential during the pandemic.

This week, Concord Regional Technical Center began bringing in small groups of EMT and nursing assistant students who are preparing for their licensing exams.

Courtesy Moira Ryan

For many students with disabilities, school closure has been a major setback. That’s because in addition to regular classes, these students get extra support - anything from tutoring to help walking and eating. And as NHPR’s Sarah Gibson reports, many families are wondering when their kids can resume these services in person.


Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A group convened by the Department of Education met for the first time Thursday to figure out how New Hampshire’s schools can resume in the fall.

Centers for Disease Control

Officials in Salem are considering imposing a fine on anyone not wearing a mask or face covering in indoor public locations in town.

Facebook screen capture

The New Hampshire Democratic Party hosted its first ever virtual convention Saturday.

The event normally gives the party a chance to energize members and donors, but this time, due to the coronavirus pandemic, it all had to happen on Facebook live.

State Democratic Party Chairman Ray Buckley told members that 2020 is the election of their lifetime. But he had to acknowledge that getting revved up during a pandemic is tough.

"We know the news can make us all anxious and, for too many, hopeless," he said, "but we all care about the future and we all must have hope."

Jessica Hunt / NHPR

High schools have new guidance from the state on hosting graduation ceremonies during school closure. In a memo shared on Wednesday, the New Hampshire Department of Education says schools can host in-person ceremonies, if all attendees can easily maintain proper social distancing.

The Department of Education suggests car parades and virtual graduations as a substitute.

Courtesy Karena Czzowitz

Karena Czzowitz, a junior at Manchester School of Technology, is studying to be a Licensed Nursing Assistant. LNA’s are in high demand across New Hampshire, especially in nursing homes.

But with school closures during the coronavirus pandemic, Karena is missing a big part of her education. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The state will expand testing for COVID-19 to every long-term care facility in New Hampshire, as health officials announced three new outbreaks of the illness at nursing homes.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Two new COVID-19 clusters have been reported at New Hampshire nursing homes, as officials announced that long-term care facilities account for 60 percent of all coronavirus-related infections in the state. 

Courtesy of Sandie MacDonald

The New Hampshire Department of Education estimates about a dozen school districts are ending the school year early, due to challenges of remote learning.

Earlier this week, the Monadnock and ConVal school districts became the latest to announce a truncated school year. Rochester, Milford, and the Groveton, Stark and Stratford district are also ending in May.

Some districts eliminated part or all of April break in order to accrue enough class instructional hours to meet state requirements in less time.

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