Piscataqua River

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The Piscataqua River will be dyed red Monday night as Portsmouth studies how wastewater from a local treatment plant would affect shellfish harvesting.

The city will release a nontoxic red dye into the river along with treated wastewater from its Pease outfall. The study will last about 12 hours, starting Monday evening into Tuesday.

The flow of the dye will simulate how untreated wastewater would move in the river, if filtration at the Pease plant ever malfunctioned.

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A boat crash in New Hampshire has left two people dead and two others injured.

State Police Marine Patrol says the accident happened Saturday night on the Piscataqua River when a 59-year-old man operating a 24-foot Boston Whaler struck a buoy in the vicinity of the Eliot boat landing, throwing a female passenger into the water. She was found unconscious in the river and later died, as did another female passenger. The operator and another male passenger were hospitalized.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

More than 100 responders from dozens of state, federal and local agencies were busy in Portsmouth Thursday, practicing their response to a hypothetical oil spill.

These exercises happen every year on the Piscataqua River between New Hampshire and Maine – but the made-up crisis they game out is always changing.

Carroll Brown is New Hampshire’s oil spill contingency planner. He says this year’s scenario imagined flying debris from a winter storm, rupturing an Irving Oil diesel tank on the riverbank in downtown Portsmouth.

A former manager of a scrap metal business in New Hampshire who admitted to dumping contaminated water into the Piscataqua River will be on federal probation for a year.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Christopher Garrity, of Leeds, Maine, was also ordered last month to pay a $5,000 fine. He pleaded guilty last year to a felony charge of discharging a pollutant into water in the U.S. without a permit.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

 

The US Coast guard says so far it seems that a small oil spill near the mouth of the Piscataqua River has been totally cleaned up before it could reach the shore.

The spill came from oily water held in a tank aboard the research catamaran Ferdinand R. Hassler, after it had been used on the ship.

Roger Wood

There is finally some visible evidence of progress in the rebuilding of the Memorial Bridge between New Hampshire and Maine.

Scientists To Test N.H.-Maine River With Dye

Dec 10, 2012

State and federal scientists in New Hampshire and Maine are planning to release a dye into the Piscataqua River to help determine if the area is suitable for recreational shellfish harvesting.