NH Economy | New Hampshire Public Radio

NH Economy

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Somewhere between the economic intimacy of Main Street shopping, and the "Deals! Deals! Deals!" consumerism of the outlets, there lies the humble strip mall.

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Ask Lionel Loveless how many Black-owned businesses there are in New Hampshire, and he guesses just a handful. 

Loveless, along with his husband Greg Pruitt, happen to own two of those businesses: the Collector’s Eye antique shop in Stratham, and Route 1 Antiques in Hampton Falls. 

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New Hampshire’s economy took another step towards reopening on Monday, as retail businesses and hair salons welcomed customers back inside their stores.

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While large sectors of the economy are shuttered at the moment, there are still plenty of products to ship, and goods to deliver to peoples’ homes.

Truckers, a loud but often invisible piece of the market, are in the middle of those transactions, logging thousands of miles back and forth across New England.

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Fabrizia Spirits in Salem relies on a key ingredient that you might not think would come in handy during a pandemic: lemons

“We buy and process about 700,000 lemons a year,” said owner Phil Mastroianni.

Normally those lemons go into limoncello, an Italian liqueur. But the coronavirus completely transformed Mastroianni’s business in the course of just one day last week.

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Booms, clangs and bangs — the sounds of a healthy supply chain — continue to echo on the production floor of Hitchiner Manufacturing in Milford.

While retailers and restaurants across New Hampshire are facing a sudden disruption in business, Hitchiner, like many of the state’s manufacturers, hasn’t yet felt the impact of the coronavirus epidemic.

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Ask some people a simple question right now - what do you do for work? - and they aren’t totally sure how to answer.

“I worked...work as a bartender,” says Helen Leavitt, unsure what tense to use.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

 

Gov. Chris Sununu issued a series of orders Tuesday morning aimed at softening the financial blow for New Hampshire residents dealing with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.  

N.H. Economic News Roundup: Forecasting 2020

Jan 3, 2020

2019 was a big year in economic news, from a trade war with China to rumors of a recession, to booming growth in some sectors, and lagging in others. We look at the big takeaways from last year, and what to watch in 2020, from real estate to workforce growth.

Original air date: Monday, January 6, 2020.

The Federal Reserve cuts interest rates again, amid concern about U.S. manufacturing health.  A new state housing task force releases its recommendations, to expand the supply of lower-priced options.  And as winter approaches, seasonal businesses are on the hunt for temporary workers.

Original air date: Wednesday, November 6, 2019. 

On the N.H. Economic News Roundup, we discuss the indicators that are raising warnings of a recession, from proposed tax cuts by President Trump, to continued tensions with China and other countries over tariffs, to swings in the stock market. How is all of this impacting New Hampshire, and what might it mean in the future? 

This program will air live at 9 a.m. on Thursday, August 21, and again at 7 p.m. Audio and transcript of the discussion will be available after the conclusion of the show. 

Hundreds of business are in D.C. opposing tariffs this week, so how will trade discussions with China and Mexico, among other places, impact New Hampshire?  Also, we have a preview of the state's lucrative summer tourism season, and discuss what the Federal Reserve might do with interest rates. 

U.S. Air Force

The Exchange is working on a series of shows about workforce shortages in New Hampshire. New Hampshire boasts one of the nation’s lowest unemployment rates, but the state is also facing a serious workforce shortage.

The Exchange will spend several shows exploring how we got here, the sectors and regions most affected, and discussing possible solutions.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

On a 210-145 vote, Democrats passed a bill on Thursday in the N.H. House that would raise the state’s minimum wage to $12 an hour.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire's rental market remains tight, and shortages of affordable housing have widespread impacts on the state's economy. We discuss housing issues, and take a look at business-related legislation at the Statehouse, including business tax cuts and a capital gains tax. 

This show airs live at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, March 11, and again at 7 p.m.

NHPR Staff

A bipartisan group of lawmakers are reviving a bill voted down last summer during a special session, as the state continues to search for a way to respond to the Wayfair Supreme Court ruling.

NHPR File Photo

A top Democrat is calling on lawmakers to reverse recent business tax cuts in the state, saying future budgets will be “grim” if Concord fails to raise enough in revenue.

Rep. Susan Almy of Lebanon, who chairs the House Ways and Means Committee, testified before that body on Wednesday in favor of House Bill 623, which would set the Business Profits Tax rate at the pre-2015 level of 8.5 percent.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Online tools like Zillow’s ‘Zestimate’ can help potential buyers estimate a fair price for a house. Kelley Blue Book does the same thing for buying a used car.

Fine art, though, has always been more subjective, and more subject to huge price swings, making price valuations difficult.

Taylor Caswell, Commissioner of the Department of Business and Economic Affairs joins us. The state's economy is looking robust with unemployment the lowest in the region. But there's also a labor shortage, workforce development challenges, and high energy costs for businesses. We get Caswell's take on these issues -- and on what senate Democrats are proposing: freezing business tax cuts.