Mass Shootings

Todd Bookman for NHPR

In the wake of this weekend’s mass shootings, gun-control advocates in New Hampshire are calling on Chris Sununu to sign off on three gun-related bills.

During a rally today in Concord, supporters said the measures are the bare minimum the governor could do, but opponents say the laws are misguided.

President Donald Trump on Monday condemned weekend shootings in Texas and Ohio as "barbaric" attacks and crimes "against all humanity" as he called for bipartisan cooperation to strengthen the nation's gun laws.

Trump said he wants legislation providing "strong background checks" for gun users, but he provided scant details and has reneged on previous promises after mass shootings.

A longtime, disgruntled city employee opened fire at a municipal building in Virginia Beach on Friday, killing 11 people before police fatally shot him, authorities said.

Six other people were wounding in the shooting, including a police officer whose bulletproof vest saved his life, said Virginia Beach Police Chief James Cervera.

Five patients were being treated at Sentara Virginia Beach General Hospital and a sixth was being transferred to the Trauma Center at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital, Sentara Healthcare tweeted.

Updated at 4:42 p.m. ET Saturday

Officials in Virginia Beach, Va., have named the 12 people who were killed in a shooting Friday at the city's municipal center.

They are:

Laquita C. Brown of Chesapeake

Tara Welch Gallagher of Virginia Beach

Mary Louise Gayle of Virginia Beach

Alexander Mikhail Gusev of Virginia Beach

Katherine A. Nixon of Virginia Beach

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Seacoast faith leaders and hundreds of residents came together for a vigil at a Portsmouth synagogue Monday night, after Saturday’s attack on Jewish worshippers in Pittsburgh.

The shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue is being investigated as a hate crime. It was the deadliest attack on American Jews in U.S. history.

The Exchange

 

The head of New Hampshire's Civil Rights Unit says the shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue that killed 11 people Saturday is a case of domestic terrorism. 

 

Elizabeth Lahey is director of the Civil Rights Unit at the New Hampshire Department of Justice. She joined The Exchange on Monday to discuss the mass shooting in Pennsylvania. Host Laura Knoy asked her if these shootings should be called domestic terrorism.

 

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

We talk to religious leaders, educators, and the director of a new civil rights unit at the N.H. Dept. of Justice about the killings this weekend at a Pittsburgh synagogue that left 11 dead and several wounded, including four police officers. This latest mass shooting occurs amid an apparent surge in hate-related speech and crimes in this country, as well as calls for political unity. 

Updated at 8:20 a.m. ET on Friday

Five people were killed and at least two others were wounded in a shooting at the Capital Gazette newsroom in Annapolis, Md., officials announced at a news conference Thursday afternoon.

Acting Anne Arundel County Police Chief William Krampf confirmed an adult male is in custody and was being interrogated by law enforcement.

U.S Air Force

Red flag laws allow family members or law enforcement to petition to get taken guns away from potential mass-shooters.  A handful of states have these laws, including Vermont, but more are considering this approach.  Still, they raise lots of questions: who decides that someone poses a threat, and do these laws make a difference?  

Updated at 10:45 p.m. ET

At least 10 people were killed when a gunman opened fire inside a small-town Texas high school, in what Gov. Greg Abbott called "probably the worst disaster ever to strike this community."

Ten others were wounded in the morning attack at Santa Fe High School.

Peter Biello / NHPR

On April 20th, 1999, Andy McDonald was 17 years old, taking a math test at Columbine High School in Colorado, when he and his fellow students heard gunshots. He says they were so loud the walls seemed to vibrate. Then the fire alarm went off and he and some of his classmates left the school.

It’s not often that a political candidate announces his or her platform, and then is immediately challenged by passionate opponents.

But last week, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Steve Marchand stood on the steps of the Lebanon City Hall taking questions - not from reporters, but passionate gun rights advocates.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

Along a party-line vote, the Republican-controlled New Hampshire Senate voted down a bill on Thursday that sought to ban so-called “bump stocks” in the state.

On the Senate floor, GOP Sen. Sharon Carson said the bill was poorly worded, and wouldn’t accomplish its goal of preventing mass shootings.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

In the wake of the Las Vegas shooting last October, New Hampshire lawmakers are considering a ban on so-called “bump stocks” in the state.

When Stephen Paddock killed 58 people and wounded hundreds more during a country music concert, guns found in his hotel room were reportedly equipped with bump stock accessories that sped up their firing rate.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/accoster/2264295876/">adam coster</a> / flickr

Last month, members of the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas experienced the deadliest church shooting in recent history. Twenty-six people were killed.

Now the New Hampshire Council of Churches is sponsoring a training event tomorrow in Nashua on how congregations should respond to an active shooter.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Rev. Jason Wells, the executive director of the council.

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)

Senator Jeanne Shaheen calls the mass shooting in Las Vegas an act of terrorism.

 

Shaheen spoke about the incident today on The Exchange. She expressed condolences to the victims and their families. She says the U.S. must address gun violence. She says it can be done while respecting the rights of gun owners.

 

It remains under investigation. But does the heinous act of violence in Las Vegas on Sunday night meet the definition of terrorism?

The Las Vegas Shooting: Granite Staters Respond

Oct 2, 2017
Ken Lund, Flickr

It's been called the worst mass shooting in modern American history.  On Sunday evening, a gunman opened fire on an outdoor concert festival  in Las Vegas, killing at least 58 people and injuring many more. Some of the stories surrounding the massacre are eerily familiar: Family members of the gunman express shock upon hearing about the attack; victims describe feelings of disbelief as scenes of mayhem and horror engulfed them.   Yet this attack also surpassed others in terms of numbers killed and injured.  We'll take your questions and comments as details of this latest mass shooting continue to emerge. 


Michael Saechang / Flickr/CC

Two more high-profile mass shootings this past month have rekindled the national debate over guns, gun rights, and gun regulation. Politicians have weighed in from the Presidential campaign trail and on Capitol Hill, but common ground remains elusive. Some say we need to tighten laws and oversight in the interest of public safety, while others say the solution is for more civilians to arm themselves in the interest of self-defense.