Heating | New Hampshire Public Radio

Heating

350 New Hampshire

Liberty Utilities says it will not build the proposed Granite Bridge natural gas pipeline in Southern New Hampshire, after finding a cheaper way to serve new customers by using existing infrastructure.

The company told the state of the change in plans in a Public Utilities Commission filing Friday afternoon. 

The $340-million pipeline plan dated to late 2017 and drew fierce opposition from climate change activists, who oppose any expansion of fossil fuel infrastructure in the region.

Dead River Company

New Hampshire's heating fuel industry is trying to recruit workers at a time of low unemployment.

The Dead River Company, which serves Northern New England, is expanding a program to employ and train recent trade school graduates as fuel technicians or truck drivers.

At the same time, training director Dan Carrigan says his company and the industry as a whole are looking to the future of home heating, amid a push to transition away from fossil fuels.

Kim Carpenter via Flickr CC

New Hampshire has opened its winter fuel assistance program two weeks early, after the release of $25 million in federal money.

The program, open to any household with an annual income below about $65,000, helps low- and middle-income residents pay their heating bills in the coldest months of the year.

The state says this year's average fuel assistance award will be around $900.

Home Heating for the New Hampshire Winter

Jan 24, 2019
State Farm/Flickr

New Hampshire winters are cold but that doesn't mean you have to be. Granite Staters face unique problems in heating their homes: some of the nation's oldest housing stock, little access to natural gas and extreme weather. New Hampshire ranked 21st on the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy’s State Energy Efficiency Scorecard while nearby Massachusetts, Connecticut and Vermont scored in the top ten.

But local programs are working to close the gap with discounted energy audits and rebates for energy efficiency home upgrades.  Plus, earth-friendly fuel options are getting more affordable. We discuss ways Granite Staters can keep warm and stay on budget. 

For a list of resources, click here! 

Your Home Is Cold. Here’s How To Fix That.

Jan 24, 2019
Robzor/ Pixabay

You’re cold and you want to fix that.  But there are a whole lot of options and a pretty big price tag with each of those options.

The phrase “energy efficiency” might have you thinking solar panels and electric cars, but the most effective energy efficiency measures are surprisingly low tech. Of course, each home has its own story - and its own expenses - but there are a number of weatherization and rebate programs available to Granite Staters to prepare your home for winter.

FILE

New Hampshire residents who fall behind on their gas and electric bills have some protection now that winter weather has set in.

During cold-weather months, disconnecting gas or electric service can be dangerous.

So last week, different rules for doing so kicked in.

Kim Carpenter via FLICKR CC

  This is All Things Considered on NHPR. I'm Peter Biello. In this extremely cold weather, home heating systems are working hard to keep people and pipes from freezing. New Hampshire's Emergency Management Director Perry Plummer has been urging residents to be patient but persistent with their service providers, as extremely cold weather drives demand for fuel deliveries. Mr. Plummer is on the line with me now.

 

Thank you very much for speaking with me. 

My pleasure.

Summer lingered a little longer than usual this year, with a string of hot and humid days in September and October. Now, temperatures have dipped below freezing and folks are lighting up their wood stoves and fireplaces.

Which brings us to our Only in NH question this week: Evan asked “Why does no one know or care that wood smoke is as bad for you as diesel smoke or cigarette smoke?

Virginia Prescott asked Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown to help us smoke out the facts.

Kim Carpenter via Flickr CC

Heating bills should drop this winter for most U.S. households, thanks to a combination of lower energy prices and warmer weather across most of the country.

The U.S. Energy Department's annual prediction Tuesday calls for lower energy costs than the past two winters.

It says the biggest savings should be for those using propane or heating oil, with homes that use propane spending $322 less and those with heating oil spending $459 less than last winter.