Coronavirus Coverage - Schools | New Hampshire Public Radio

Coronavirus Coverage - Schools

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

A continuación, lee las noticias del miércoles 24 de febrero.

También puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio. 

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Pueblos universitarios tienen más casos de COVID-19 que el resto de comunidades 

New Hampshire State House photo
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A continuación, lee las noticias del 22 de febrero.

También puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio. 

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Se reducen número de casos de COVID-19, pacientes hospitalizados y muertes en el estado

photo of sign saying this stairwell is up only
Sarah Gibson/NHPR

While nearly all school districts in the state are offering in-person learning or a hybrid model, where students take classes in-person some days and at home others, Gov. Chris Sununu has ordered the remaining districts still in a fully-remote model to switch to at least some in-person learning.

What's it like to come of age during a time of extreme political division and a global pandemic? We talk with young Granite Staters about how the past year has shaped and impacted them, and what they're thinking about the future.

Air date: Tuesday, January 26, 2021. 


A continuación, encuentra las noticias del lunes 11 de enero.

Escucha haciendo click en el audio o léelas en esta publicación. 

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Funcionarios reportan nuevos casos y nuevos fallecimientos mientras continúan en primera fase de vacunación

Los funcionarios de salud de New Hampshire reportaron 797 [setecientos noventa y siete] nuevos casos de COVID-19 el domingo.

Flickr/Ivan Radic

Far fewer young children are attending public kindergarten and preschool programs this year, according to recently released data from the New Hampshire Department of Education. The decline is part of a state-wide trend of decreased public school enrollment during the pandemic that is most dramatic among younger grades.

Courtesy Photo

As we approach the end of a tumultuous year, NHPR is checking in with some of the people we spoke with early on in the pandemic, to see how things have changed. It’s part of a series we’re calling "Hindsight.”

Amanda Loder for NHPR

Fewer students in New Hampshire are attending their neighborhood public school this year, according to new data from the state Department of Education.

The state typically sees a one percent drop in public school enrollment each year, due to aging demographics, but this fall’s decline is far more significant: about four percent statewide.

Despite widespread concerns, two new international studies show no consistent relationship between in-person K-12 schooling and the spread of the coronavirus. And a third study from the United States shows no elevated risk to childcare workers who stayed on the job.

photo of unh wildcat statue
Dan Tuohy | NHPR

Hoy, jueves 1 de octubre, te compartimos un breve resumen de las noticias más importantes del estado y luego, una conversación que María Aguirre, nuestra productora, tuvo con un estudiante de la Universidad de New Hampshire sobre su vida universitaria en tiempos de pandemia. 

Puedes escuchar la entrevista y las noticias haciendo click en el audio o leerlas a continuación.  

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

State health officials are doubling down on their recommendations to schools for dealing with potential COVID-19 cases, in spite of criticism that the recommendations are too strict.

The state says students with any new or unexplained COVID-19 symptoms should immediately be sent home and referred to their physician for COVID-19 testing.

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

School districts will be getting less money from the federal government than they expected this fall to cover COVID-related expenses.

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For months, officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) had told schools that they were eligible for reimbursement for PPE, plastic desk barriers, cleaning supplies, and other materials.