Bears

Courtesy of Omni Mount Washington Resort

It seems bears enjoy a good view just like any other visitor to the White Mountains in New Hampshire.

A photo snapped June 29 by an employee at the Omni Mount Washington Resort shows a black bear holding onto a rail on the veranda and looking out. The photo was taken around 5 a.m. and the employee, Sam Geesaman, said he had only wanted to get a photo of the sunrise.

Instead, he caught the bear as it climbed stairs in search of a trash can. The bear moved on after Gessaman loudly clapped and stomped.

via Google Maps

Camping has been suspended along Tripoli Road in the White Mountains due to a family of bears. The Forest Service is hoping to lift the ban soon.

The Forest Service's Steven Beri says the mama bear and her two cubs have become overly comfortable with humans and reliant on human food. 

And bear sightings along the road have risen sharply the past two weeks.

For years, an elderly resident of Hanover, N.H., fed one particular female black bear. The old man's food offer of choice? Birdseed and maple-glazed doughnuts from a diner down the street.

Then the man died, and the bear started venturing out farther in search of more delicious treats.

She had become comfortable around humans, and people in town grew to love her — a lumbering, strong but gentle animal that would come right up to your door. She's named Mink, after a local natural area called Mink Brook.

An Update on N.H.'s Bear Population

May 7, 2019
Courtesy of Kilham Bear Center

After several years of abundant natural foods, such as acorns, berries or apples, bears in New Hampshire are emerging  from dens this spring skinny, hungry, and forced to forage farther afield for food. We look at the impact of the recent scarcity of food, and the likelihood that it might increase human-bear interactions. Bear rehabilitator Ben Kilham of the Kilham Bear Center in Lyme, N.H., says he has taken in over 70 orphaned cubs, an unprecedented number. And we discuss the incredible journey of Mink, the troublesome "Hanover Bear" who was relocated to the North Country, but has been tracked travelling south. 

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

New Hampshire wildlife officials have the same message every spring when it comes to bears.

Bring in bird feeders, they say, get chickens inside some kind of bear-proof enclosure and make sure trash is stored away.

But the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department has been running into a very human problem: apathy. 

Courtesy of Patricia Campbell

A black bear sow New Hampshire wildlife officials relocated to the North Country last year in an attempt to keep the animal out of trouble in Hanover has made her way back to the Upper Valley.

The bear is affectionately known as Mink, after the local Mink Brook natural area where she often spent her time.

Over the years, she and her offspring became accustomed to feeding on garbage and birdseed around Hanover, home to Dartmouth College.

New Hampshire Fish and Game planned to shoot her as a last resort after her yearling cubs found their way into a home in town.

Jeannette S. / Flicker CC

Conflicts between bears and humans in New Hampshire almost doubled this past year with about 800 reported encounters.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Andrew Timmins, a bear biologist for the N.H. Fish & Game Department, about this increase.

Jessica Hunt/NHPR

We sit down with Glenn Normandeau, Executive Director of New Hampshire Fish and Game (at left).  We discuss recent headlines about his agency: from public boat launches to bears in downtown neighborhoods to a recent legislative study calling Fish and Game "woefully underfunded."

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: October 12, 2018

Oct 12, 2018

The debate season is well underway, and in the first congressional district, the two candidates are staking out their differences - but both agree, the historic nature of their race is no big deal.  More than two dozen sites at the Saint Gobain plant are under scrutiny for contamination. And the bear-human conflicts continues this fall, with Fish & Game making the decision to shoot two bear cubs in Manchester. 

N.H. Fish and Game

 

Officials with the New Hampshire Fish and Game on Thursday defended shooting dead two bears that were running to a busy roadway, saying they posed a danger to motorists.

 

A Groton resident was seriously injured after a bear entered her home. 

 

Jim Juneau of New Hampshire Fish and Game says that a wild black bear was likely startled when a 71-year old woman discovered it in her kitchen early Tuesday morning. 

 

"The bear reacted in a panicked manner and unfortunately she sustained some injuries," he says.

 

The woman is currently at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, after undergoing surgery. 

 

Petition To Save Mink The Bear Quickly Gains Steam

Jul 16, 2018
Courtesy Ron DiMasi

A bear in Hanover nicknamed "Mink" is now the subject of a second online petition aimed at saving her life.

The first, last year, gained so much attention that Governor Chris Sununu ordered Fish and Game to pardon the animal. At the time, her then-yearlings had gotten into a home in town.

This time around, the petition comes after Mink’s relocation to the North Country. According to the latest update from Fish and Game, she’s covering long distances to try to get home. 

Courtesy of Crawford Notch Campground

 

A momma bear and her cubs are no longer going to be causing mischief by raiding trash bins and bird feeders near Dartmouth College in New Hampshire.

Officials said the bear nicknamed Mink was captured Friday and hauled north to Coos County, near the Canadian border, where she was released with a tracking collar.

Andy Timmins, bear project leader for the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, tells the Valley News that he hopes the bear stays put. But, he added, "I'm not sure this is the end of the story."

Police Shoot Black Bear in Cornish

Jun 7, 2018
Courtesy of Crawford Notch Campground

Cornish police shot and killed a bear Monday that had  repeatedly returned to a local property to feed on the homeowner's chickens. 

The homeowner, who runs a daycare onsite, first called the police Saturday.

Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

State wildlife officials are considering scrapping their plans to relocate a female bear from the Hanover area.

It’s the latest turn-of-events for an animal whose fate has swung dramatically over the past year, aided in part by a grassroots public-awareness campaign and a last-minute reprieve by Governor Chris Sununu.

Fish and Game officials decided last spring to kill the bear after her then-yearlings got into a home in Hanover.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 11, 2018

May 10, 2018

The state's new Child Advocate launches an investigation into the Sununu Youth Center following allegations of a pattern of illegal use of restraints on juveniles there.  For the third time this year, the New Hampshire House of Representatives votes against a bill to create education savings accounts. Voting laws and Medicaid expansion are on the governor's desk to be signed into law.  And it's that time of year - bears are out, looking for easy pickings at your bird-feeder...even in Manchester.

WATCH THE SHOW:

Mother Bear is Back in Hanover ... But Not for Long

Apr 13, 2018
Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

New Hampshire wildlife officials have a new plan for a bear in Hanover that gave local and state officials the run-around last year.   

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Spring in New Hampshire means black bears are emerging from their dens to search for food – including around your backyard bird feeder.

And warming winters are bringing the bears out sooner. So state officials now want people to bring in their bird feeders earlier than ever.

Kelly Dwyer lives in a big, airy house nestled up against the woods in Hooksett. Being back here, she says, has its perks:

“The surprise of what is going to show up that day – what’s going to fly in or walk in – it’s really exciting,” she says. “And just the peace and tranquility.”

https://youtu.be/Aw7CgEYs7M8

With spring on the way, state conservation officials say it's time for residents to take in their bird feeders.

Even as winter weather continues, the Department of Fish and Game's bear project leader Andrew Timmins says bears are waking up – and they're hungry for rich, fatty foods like birdseed.

"Bears have excellent memories. They know where they've got 'em in the past, and they'll routinely check those areas to see if those feeders are still available,” he says. “And they'll just start searching backyards in general looking for that food.”

Relocated Hanover Bear Killed by Hunter in Quebec

Nov 2, 2017
Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

One of three bears relocated from the Hanover area this spring was shot and killed by a hunter in Quebec shortly after it was released, according to Andy Timmins, bear project leader for the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

Black Bear Spotted and Killed in Downtown Nashua

Jul 4, 2017
Michael Webber via Flickr CC

A wild black bear was shot and killed in downtown Nashua late last night.

Living with Black Bears in Back Yards

Jun 5, 2017

The recent saga of the troublesome family of bears in Hanover, destined to be killed after they entered a home in search of food, is one of the latest examples of conflict between black bears and humans in New Hampshire.  Governor Chris Sununu intervened, and the three yearlings were captured and relocated to the north country, although the mother bear has yet to be located.  The Hanover human-bear conflict generated concern nationwide, with hundreds signing an online petition and flooding N.H. Fish & Game with calls.  Why did this conflict resonate with so many - and how do we continue to live with bears in New Hampshire?

 


 

Three juvenile bears in Hanover that were initially targeted to be destroyed have been trapped and relocated.

New Hampshire Fish & Game had said last week the three bears and their mother had to be killed, after two of the cubs entered a home. But Governor Chris Sununu then intervened, saying the bears should be released in a remote location.

Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

The State Fish and Game Department is being flooded with calls about four bears in the Hanover area. Officials recently decided to trap and kill the bears after two of the animals entered a home in town. 

Andrew Timmins heads the department’s bear program and says many people are calling from far away, wanting to save the animals.  

State officials have set traps for four bears in the Hanover area after two of the animals recently entered a home there. Once caught, the bears will be shot, according to Mark Ellingwood, Wildlife Division Chief for the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

Conservation biologists say that the good news for wildlife is there are still extensive tracts of forest habitat in the northeast. Yet as humans have built up roads and housing developments, crossing between key habitat areas — such as from the Adirondacks to the Green Mountains — can be a dangerous trip for a moose or a bear.   

Something Wild: Black Bears 101 with Ben Kilham

Oct 7, 2016
Michael Webber via Flickr CC

Black bears are as much a part of New Hampshire as fall foliage and stone walls, nevertheless they are a misunderstood species. To better understand the species, we wanted to talk to a bear, the closest thing we could get was Ben Kilham. And that’s pretty close, which is evident when you meet him. He’s over six-feet tall and moves with a slow ambling gait. His ursine tendencies aren’t surprising when you consider Kilham’s been studying and living with black bears for nearly 25 years.

Sean Hurley

Growing up in Loudon, Andrew Timmins didn’t see his first bear until he was nearly 20.  Now, as Fish & Game’s Bear Project leader, Timmins manages the state’s population of more than 5,500 bears. NHPR’s Sean Hurley recently spent a day with Timmins at a bear hotspot at the Attitash Ski Resort and learned how the state regularly catches troublesome bears and relocates them to the northernmost part of the state.

 

The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department is asking residents to take down bird feeders to avoid attracting bears that have emerged from their winter dens early this year.

The department's bear project leader says bears are emerging from their dens about a month early due to the mild winter and recent spring-like conditions.

He says bear activity and sightings have become more frequent in the past week and will become increasingly frequent in the coming weeks.

Something Wild: Black Bears 101 with Ben Kilham

Oct 30, 2015
Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/cjdv7S

Black bears are as much a part of New Hampshire as fall foliage and stone walls, nevertheless they are a misunderstood species. To better understand the species, we wanted to talk to a bear, the closest thing we could get was Ben Kilham. And that’s pretty close, which is evident when you meet him. He’s over six-feet tall and moves with a slow ambling gait. His ursine tendencies aren’t surprising when you consider Kilham’s been studying and living with black bears for nearly 25 years.

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