Gillibrand Touts Plan For Publicly Funded Elections At N.H. Politics & Eggs

Jul 9, 2019

New York Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand campaigns for president at Saint Anselm College on July 9, 2019.
Credit Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Democratic presidential candidate Kirsten Gillibrand made her pitch to people attending New Hampshire's Politics and Eggs breakfast Tuesday.

The New York senator is the latest 2020 hopeful to participate in the traditional campaign stop at Saint Anselm College, where she shook hands with business and policy advocates and signed the event’s signature wooden eggs.

“I don’t pander, and I am not competitive, but I will sign every egg in this room before I leave,” Gillibrand said, to laughs.

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Gillibrand last week released a detailed plan to “protect democracy and tackle corruption,” which she said includes prioritizing the creation of publicly funded elections.

"Every candidate out there has a lot of plans, a lot of good ideas. You will not get any of them done if you don't know what's standing in your way,” she said. “And I promise you, as soon as you get money out of politics, it changes everything."

Gillibrand also took questions on social security, drug prices, paid family medical leave, Alzheimer’s research and the use of science in policy-making.

She criticized President Donald Trump for lacking “compassion,” and said she believes a working mother like herself could achieve far more in the White House than a “misogynist.”

Gillibrand also talked about the connections she sees between top issues arising on the New Hampshire primary campaign trail.

She said she sees climate change as not just an environmental issue, but one of immigration and refugee policy – and she said comprehensive immigration reform could improve economic stability and bring in tax revenue to reduce the federal deficit.

Tuesday’s stop in Manchester capped off Gillibrand’s latest big trip to New Hampshire. She's spent the past week touring the state.