Dan Barrick | New Hampshire Public Radio

Dan Barrick

News Director

News Director Dan Barrick and a cub reporter enjoy a reporting trip to the Seacoast.

Dan manages NHPR's newsroom and also oversees the Document team, a longform, narrative news reporting project.

He joined NHPR in 2015 as senior editor for politics and policy. Prior to that, Dan was deputy director of the New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies, an independent, non-partisan think tank. He also worked for nearly a decade at the Concord Monitor in various roles, including political reporter, business reporter, deputy city editor, and news editor.

Reach Dan by email, or find him on Twitter @danielbarrick.

Supporters of President Trump protest at the New Hampshire State House, November 14, 2020
Dan Barrick / NHPR

As President Trump continues his refusal to concede to President-Elect Joe Biden or acknowledge his loss in his bid for re-election, his supporters protested the election results in several events this weekend in New Hampshire.

Voters line up at the Manchester City Clerk's office on Oct. 24, 2020.
Dan Tuohy, NHPR

Even before the polls close on Election Day, the pandemic has already reshaped the 2020 race in New Hampshire.

When state election officials announced this spring that any voter can cast an absentee ballot if they’re concerned about the coronavirus, it set off a record number of requests. Now, as of the morning of Nov. 3, hundreds of thousands of New Hampshire voters have already cast their ballots absentee.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

In an effort to be more transparent with our listeners, NHPR has been answering your questions about how we cover the news. NHPR's news director Dan Barrick spoke with Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley about our plans for Election Day coverage and beyond.

Click here for all of NHPR's coverage plans and 2020 Election resources.  

In an effort to improve transparency around our coverage, NHPR is here to answer your questions about how we cover the news. 

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with NHPR's News Director Dan Barrick about how we're planning to cover this election season, and what we're doing to earn your trust as a listener. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Former New Hampshire Gov. Steve Merrill has died.

Merrill, a Republican, served two terms as governor, from 1993 to 1997. He had previously served as New Hampshire Attorney General.

He was 74.

This story was with additional information after the New Hampshire Republican Party clarified its plans for correcting the mistake on its mailers. You can read the party's plan in full here.

NHPR staff

Gov. Chris Sununu issued an expansive stay-at-home order Thursday, requiring all New Hampshire residents except for those employed by “essential” businesses to stay put until at least May 4 to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

 

Gov. Chris Sununu issued a series of orders Tuesday morning aimed at softening the financial blow for New Hampshire residents dealing with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.  

The race for control of the New Hampshire Senate is playing out across the state’s 24 Senate districts.

But, thanks in part to years of partisan gerrymandering, the majority of those districts are not terribly competitive, with either Democrats or Republicans all but guaranteed a victory.

NHPR

Back in January, former New Hampshire governor John H. Sununu warned voters against “drinking the Trump Kool-Aid.”

On Tuesday, Sununu poured himself a glass and took a big sip.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Update, Sept. 7: You can find Republican Ted Gatsas' completed questionnaire here.

Taxes. The economy. Education spending. The opioid epidemic. New Hampshire's next governor faces a long list of policy challenges when he or she takes office in January. With the largest field of contenders in at least two decades, sorting through the gubernatorial candidates' positions on these and other issues is no easy task.

Allegra Boverman/NHPR

One-third of New Hampshire’s 24 senators are retiring this year, leaving 8 vacant seats. That’s a lot by recent standards, and it puts a big question mark over New Hampshire politics after Election Day. But those state Senate races haven’t exactly been in the spotlight in this busy election season.

Even the candidates acknowledge it.

Spend any time around Sen. Kelly Ayotte or Gov. Maggie Hassan nowadays, and you'll hear repeated assurances that while it may be election season, they remain wholly dedicated to serving New Hampshire.

But take a look at either’s fundraising books in their race for the U.S. Senate, and you'll find plenty of proof that both are also focusing further afield.


Sara Plourde / NHPR

The classic gerrymandered map you learned about in high school civics class is full of oddly-shaped legislative districts, drawn with obvious intent to boost one party.

But in New Hampshire, that’s rarely the case: It’s very hard to see, just by looking at the election maps, which districts might help or hurt a certain party’s chances.

So has gerrymandering been a factor in the state’s politics? And if so, how much?

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Conventional wisdom holds that Bernie Sanders' and Donald Trump's big wins in New Hampshire’s presidential primary earlier this month were driven by hordes of irregular and first-time voters flocking to the polls.

But a review of preliminary voting data doesn’t exactly back up that premise.

This story was originally posted on the website of member station NHPR:

If you want to know whether Hillary Clinton will stay close to Bernie Sanders in New Hampshire on Tuesday or are looking for an early hint of how the Republican race will end up, here's a tip: Keep an eye on Rochester.

If you want to know whether Hillary Clinton will stay close to Bernie Sanders Tuesday, or are looking for an early hint of how the Republican race will end up, here's a tip: Keep an eye on Rochester.

AP/John Minchillo

In the final week of the New Hampshire presidential primary, NHPR is taking a closer listen to how some of the candidates are pitching themselves to the state's voters – through their standard stump speech. We've taken a few key moments in a recent speech and marked up the sound in each clip - just click listen to see them roll out. 

Here's an annotated recording of a recent speech by Democrat Bernie Sanders, delivered January 14, 2016 at Dartmouth's Spaulding Auditorium. (You can hear the full speech using the player at the bottom of this story.)

New Hampshire political history resounds with the names of candidates who used the state's First in the Nation Presidential Primary to vault to national political fame. 

Jimmy Carter. Bill Clinton. John McCain.

But what did those primary elections look like in the moment, town by town across New Hampshire? Where did Bill Clinton stake out his biggest wins, to ensure a close second-place finish in the 1992 primary (and resurrect his presidential campaign in the process)? Just how big was Patrick Buchanan's legendary win in the 1996 GOP Primary? What towns have Republican candidates most consistently relied on to win?

Tracy Lee Carroll / NHPR

It’s one of the most conventional nuggets of political wisdom: To win an election, first secure your base, then expand from there.

But recent New Hampshire political history shows that candidates can win their party’s core towns, and still lose the election. It happened, in both parties’ presidential primaries, in 2008. 

Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're now just one month away from Primary Day in New Hampshire, when the politicking stops (or at least moves elsewhere) and the voting starts.

Maybe you're only now paying attention to the race. Maybe you still haven't decided how to cast your ballot, or want to brush up on a particular issue. In any case, help is here. 

Chris Jensen for NHPR

The presidential primary trail is taking a rare detour through New Hampshire’s North Country this week.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham ended his presidential campaign this morning. A well-known voice in Republican foreign policy debates, and a frequent visitor to New Hampshire, Graham failed to catch on with voters here. NHPR’s Senior Editor for Politics Dan Barrick spoke with All Things Considered Host Peter Biello, to look back on Graham’s short-lived White House bid.

NHPR File Photo

Whether measured in polls, crowds or money raised, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton appear in a tight race as New Hampshire's Primary Day approaches.

Clinton, of course, is no stranger to hard-fought Granite State contests. She edged out Barack Obama in New Hampshire’s 2008 Democratic presidential primary, winning 39 percent of the vote to Obama’s 37 percent.   

But the bottom-line vote tallies can obscure a simple fact: The New Hampshire primary is not just a statewide contest. 

Josh Rogers/NHPR

Reading this story on your iPhone or iPad? Download NHPR's new State of Democracy app and stay connected to the stories that matter from the 2016 campaign trail. Click here to get the app.

While the New Hampshire Primary has been humming along at top speed for months, it’s easy to overlook the fact that two basic details have yet to be wrapped up: the actual date of the Primary election, and the official candidate names to appear on the ballot. At least one of those should start looking a bit firmer this week.

When the Department of Education released its latest round of state-level reading and math scores this week, it was cause for cheer in New Hampshire. The state ranked in the top two or three states in every category and grade-level tests.

Those kind of high marks have been common in New Hampshire for years. But a recent report suggests the state’s status as one of the nation’s top test-takers should come down a few notches. 

Last week we examined the campaign money landscape in the New Hampshire Primary, both how candidates are raising money in the state, and how they're spending it.

But what do those dollars mean against the national campaign fundraising picture?

Presidential candidates boosted their spending in New Hampshire this summer, spending nearly six times as much as they did in the previous three month period.

The Republican and Democratic candidates doled out nearly $2 million across the state from July to September. The vast majority of that cash, however, went to a small handful of Republican operatives and consultants -- and the New Hampshire Democratic Party.

 The 2016 race for New Hampshire governor is rapidly gathering momentum, even with Election Day more than a year away. Candidacies are being launched by the day, it seems. Pledges made. Priorities listed. Promises floated.

And now we have the first campaign ad of the race. It comes courtesy of Republican Frank Edelblut, a state legislator who's apparently hoping to ride-share his way to the governor's office. 

Associated Press

For as long as New Hampshire has hosted the nation’s first presidential primary contest, it seems outsiders have been trying to dilute the state’s influence. The latest such attempt comes from the Republican National Committee chairman, Reince Priebus.

In an interview with the National Journal, Priebus says he’s been supportive of early nominating states like New Hampshire and Iowa in the past, but “I don’t think anyone should get too comfortable.”

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