WebHeader_Grove.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Become a sustaining member today for your chance to win two season ski passes to the NH ski resort of your choice.
NH News
Measuring around 18 miles long, New Hampshire has the smallest shoreline of all coastal states. But for about 400 years, it’s been enough to support small boat fishermen in the Seacoast region. They make their livings cruising New England’s waters for cod, lobster, shrimp and other stocks.For decades, the industry’s been challenged by declining populations of fish and shellfish, as well as changing federal regulations. As of 2010, New England fishermen are allowed to catch a set poundage of fish based on their take over a 10-year span. New Hampshire fishermen argue this change has made the cost of working outpace profits, forced many small boats out of business, and discouraged new people from entering the industry. No matter the cause, figures from the US Census Bureau clearly show an industry in decline. In Portsmouth, the Seacoast’s main city, the Census Bureau reports only 0.2 percent of residents work in the “Farming, fishing and forestry occupations” category. That’s compared to 0.6 percent in 2000. A number of New Hampshire fishermen, politicians, and historians believe that without change, the state’s small boat fishing industry is heading toward extinction.Summary provided by StateImpact NH

Two Loons Die from Lead Poisoning in New Hampshire

file000906938305.jpg
Momma of 3 Beauties
/
Morguefile

Two loons have died in New Hampshire this summer from ingesting lead fishing tackle. This comes after the state strengthened a law earlier in the season to restrict lead fishing gear.

New Hampshire Fish and Game reports that the two birds died in lakes near Lempster and Stoddard. Metal jigs and fishing line were found inside the loons' gizzards, and lab tests showed fatal amounts of lead in their blood.

Ingesting lead bait is the leading cause of adult loon mortality in the granite state. Loons reproduce late in their lives, so the chance that they could die of lead poisoning before having offspring is relatively great. And that poses a serious threat to the overall loon population.

The Loon Preservation Committee and New Hampshire Fish and Game are now helping anglers switch to lead-free bait by providing an array of safe alternatives, such as tackle made of steel, tungsten, or tin.

Related Content