Racism

Joe Gratz / flickr, creative commons: https://www.flickr.com/photos/63126465@N00/117048243

Last summer, an alleged attack on a biracial boy in Claremont made national headlines. There were also racially charged incidents at UNH, and on a school bus in the Oyster River School District.

In December, with those events swirling in the local news, Governor Chris Sununu announced a major change within the state’s top law enforcement agency.

Daniela Allee / NHPR

Fifty years ago, Martin Luther King Jr. started the Poor People's Campaign to fight systemic racism and poverty. More than 100 people gathered outside the State House Monday as part of a nationwide re-launch of Dr. King’s Poor People's Campaign.

Those issues hit close to home for Asma Elhuni. She said she's experienced economic hard times, and she's also concerned about an increase in acts of hatred toward Muslims.

Britta Greene / NHPR

An advisory council appointed by Governor Chris Sununu to look at race and diversity issues said they'll return to Claremont after an initial public meeting Thursday night.  

 The city was the site of an attack on a young biracial boy last year that made national headlines. Discussion at the meeting, part of series of listening sessions the council is performing around the state, focused to a large degree on that incident.

Mike Ross / UNH

Officials at the University of New Hampshire are hoping to avoid a repeat of last year’s racially charged Cinco de Mayo celebrations with a new community service event this Saturday.

Facebook - All Eyes on UNH

A UNH task force on campus climate has released its final report roughly a year after a series of racially charged incidents embroiled the campus.

The task force makes fifteen recommendations in the report, including one to make the group permanent as an advisory council to the UNH president.

Author Debby Irving's memoir, "Waking Up White" serves as inspiration for New Hampshire's Oyster River community, as it reflects on tough questions about race and tolerance.  The discussions come after incidents revealing discrimination and racism, in an area where many believed they had the best intentions.  We examine how a state like New Hampshire, that is mostly white, fits into the national narrative of racial strife, now and in the past.

Robert Garrova for NHPR

The New Hampshire Council on Diversity and Inclusion held its first public listening session on the campus of UNH in Durham on Wednesday night.

 

The public forums are meant to collect stories and concerns from the community so that they can affect future policy and legislation.

 

Jason Moon for NHPR

It's been nearly five months since a racist bullying incident shocked the Oyster River School District community.

Parents and school administrators met Wednesday to talk about what's been done in response, and priorities going forward.

It was this past September when a 7-year old black student was bullied with racist language while riding the school bus home. The incident shocked many, including Oyster River Superintendent Jim Morse.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Speaking at a Martin Luther King Jr. event in Manchester, Governor Chris Sununu urged New Hampshire residents to add their voice to community forums in the coming months.

 

He pointed to his administration’s new council on diversity and inclusion, as well as a new Civil Rights Unit established within the Attorney General’s Office.

 

 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Gov. Chris Sununu just made two announcements on equity issues at the state level. The state Department of Justice is launching a new civil rights unit. And the governor is forming a new advisory council on diversity and inclusion.

 

Peter Biello, host of All Things Considered, speaks with Andrew Smith, who will be involved in the new state efforts. Smith works in the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services. He works with groups in New Hampshire after racial incidents occur.

 

University of New Hampshire

Last May, the atmosphere on campus at UNH was tense.

A video showing a confrontation between students about racist stereotypes on Cinco de Mayo went viral. So did images of students wearing blackface. Swastikas and racial slurs started showing up graffitied on campus. Then, sculptures installed to show solidarity for minority students in the midst of all this were vandalized.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Last night in Durham, parents, teachers, and students from the Oyster River School District met for a conversation about diversity and discrimination.

The event comes several weeks after allegations of racist bullying in the school district.

As NHPR’s Jason Moon reports, the event last night was a time for people to share their stories and to chart where to go from here.  

 

Recent allegations of racist attacks or bullying among school-aged children have schools and communities doing some soul searching, along with establishing new policies and procedures.   

Grace Caudhill, the mother of a 7-year-old boy allegedly racially harassed on a school bus in the Oyster River School district told NHPR reporter Jason Moon that she has heard from the parents of biracial children in other parts of the state who describe similar experiences of "racial denigration and racial hate in school."  (Listen to the full story here.) 

Jason Moon for NHPR

The first few weeks of school in the towns of Durham, Lee, and Madbury have been clouded by allegations of racist bullying  on a school bus.

NHPR’s Jason Moon recently sat down with the superintendent of the school district and the parents of the alleged victim to hear how each are grappling with the situation.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Over the next several months, the Claremont schools will take a closer look at issues of discrimination and bullying in the district. This comes after an alleged racially motivated attack of a young boy in town by local teenagers.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 15, 2017

Sep 15, 2017

It's not primary season, but voting issues are top of mind in New Hampshire lately with the Presidential Commission on Election Integrity meeting in Manchester this week.  The voting law known as SB3 faces  its first test in a special election in Belknap County.  And Claremont grapples with race-based tension after a report of an alleged lynching attack on an eight-year-old biracial boy.  

Claremont City Manager Ryan McNutt and Police Chief Mark Chase will attend a community event Tuesday night aimed at responding to the alleged race-based attack of a young biracial boy in town, McNutt said.

A social and racial justice group is calling on the Claremont Police Department to be more forthcoming with information about injuries suffered by an 8-year-old biracial boy last month.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Christopher Cantwell has been in the news in Keene this week. The city resident - and white nationalist - was featured in a Vice documentary about the clashes in Charlottesville that aired on HBO and went viral online. In the footage, he expresses his hatred for black people and Jews.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 19, 2017

May 18, 2017

N.H. political figures respond to this week's turmoil in Washington D.C., quelled to some extent by the appointment of the widely respected Robert S. Mueller III as special counsel to  investigate possible Russian meddling in the 2016 election. State representative Robert Fisher resigns after a N.H. House committee inquiry into his postings on the misogynistic Reddit forum known as the Red Pill. And several racially-charged incidents in recent weeks cloud graduation season at UNH's Durham campus.


UNH Police

University of New Hampshire police have arrested a student who they say damaged artwork that was meant to show support for students targeted by hate speech in recent days.

Shaan William DeJong, 19, of Hooksett was arrested on a charge of criminal mischief and later released on personal recognizance bail.

Police say DeJong damaged sculpted fists outside of Stoke Hall designed by students in support of those impacted by recent racially-charged incidents on campus.

Brainlesssteel via Flickr CC

 

Police at the University of New Hampshire are investigating swastika drawings found in a student dormitory.

The images were discovered Friday in a stairwell at Stoke Hall, the largest dorm on the Durham campus.

The discovery followed a Thursday night forum in which dozens of UNH students urged administrators to do more to combat racism.

In a statement headlined "Another Incident: This Must Stop" UNH President Mark Huddleston and Provost Nancy Targett said they condemned "all acts and behavior of hate and bias."

Pedro Angeles via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/DKinG

On today's show: 

  • We spoke to Wesley Lowery about his experience reporting on race and activism, and the myth of objectivity. His recent book is They Can't Kill Us All.
  • "Oil, Water" from Nate DiMeo and The Memory Palace. Listen again at prx.org
  • Civics 101: The Nuclear Codes
  • A Series of Tubes with Rob Fleischman
  • "Cycling 101 for Adults" from producer Sarah Elzas and Radio Farnce International. Listen again at prx. org

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  A community vigil is planned for Tuesday, after Manchester school officials say racially-charged signs were found posted outside two of the city's schools last week.

Manchester Superintendent Bolgen Vargas sent a letter home to parents last week, informing them of the first sign discovered on a fence outside the Middle School at Parkside Wednesday. The sign referenced the "White Genocide Project" and read, "Diversity is a codeword for white genocide."

In the letter, Vargas said the sign was removed immediately and the incident is under investigation.

Joe Plocki via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/Dgd7R

California newspapers once wrote that Chinese immigrants had "most of the vices and few of the virtues of the African". Until 1940, Asian Americans earned less than whites...and less than black Americans too. All that changed just a few generations.  Today, how Asian Americans became a "model minority."

Then, from unidentified noises to a story of heartbreaking loss, we scour the audio landscape for sound we can't help but share. Morning Edition host Rick Ganley joins us for the latest installment of Overheard.

Guy Sie via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/6gdiLA

The word vitamin has only been around for just over 100 years.  But now vitamins are a $36 billion dollar-a-year industry. Today, the history and science behind a mostly unregulated market.

Plus, can a dress shirt be racist?  An online retailer has come up with an algorithm they say ensures a near-perfect fit... But part of that data set includes ethnicity, prompting questions about the connection between ethnicity and biology.

Aaron Webb via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/zfVaH

Police shootings and deaths of African-Americans in police custody have prompted calls for a national conversation about race. So, what do well-meaning white people have to add? We speak with the author of a new memoir urges white people to examine their privileged place in a stacked deck. Plus, the five words many parents dread: “where do babies come from?” A new book answers that question at a time where surrogacy, same sex couples, and fertility labs are challenging old norms and the standby response, “when a daddy really loves a mommy…” Today, we’re tackling the tough conversations. 

9.28.15: White Lies, Pill Trackers, & Man Buns

Sep 28, 2015
Paweł Marciniak via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/zfPq8

Among the choices for the 2015 edition of the Best American Poetry, a poem by Yi-Fen Chou.  The problem? The author was actually a white guy using a made-up name. Today, white privilege in the poetry world, and the editor who defended his use of racial nepotism. Then, since airline de-regulation in the 1970s, legroom and seat width have measurably decreased, leading to cramped misery in economy-class cabins. But is it a human rights issue? One organization says yes. 

Chris Goldberg via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/cjtwcN

Police shootings of unarmed black men and the deaths of African-Americans in police custody have prompted calls for a national conversation about racial inequality. So, what do well-meaning, privileged white people have to add? Today, the author of a new memoir urges white people to examine their privileged place in a stacked deck. Then, author and New Hampshire magazine editor Rick Broussard turns film director for Granite Orpheus, an experimental film project that sets the ancient myth of Orpheus against the torn-up streets of Concord.   

Tom Gill via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/LNxeQ

America's first blockbuster: a depiction of the Civil War and early Reconstruction that featured  white actors in blackface, portraying feeble-minded or rapacious slaves, culminating with masked Klansmen galloping in to save the South. On today show, we talk about the film that set of a resurgence of savage Klan activity and has had an enduring influence on American racism and politics. Then, vexillogists, people who study flags. Here's a trick: if you want to design a great flag, start by drawing a one-by-one-and-a-half inch rectangle on a piece of paper. And finally -- what happened to surrender? It's becoming increasingly rare. 

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