prison | New Hampshire Public Radio

prison

Cheryl Senter / NHPR

The New Hampshire Department of Corrections says that in order to comply with Gov. Chris Sununu's proposed budget, it would have to cut rehabilitative and educational programs that serve hundreds of inmates every year.

In a presentation to lawmakers this week, DOC Commissioner Helen Hanks said the state is looking at closing the Shea Farm Transitional Housing Unit for women in Concord and the Calumet Transitional Housing Unit for men in Manchester. These halfway houses currently serve around fifty inmates who typically are working in the community and awaiting parole hearings.  

Cheryl Senter / NHPR

People who are incarcerated have been particularly vulnerable to COVID-19 outbreaks during this pandemic. New Hampshire's state prison system has been managing several outbreaks over the last few months.

Office of Gov. Chris Sununu

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del martes 15 de diciembre. También, escucha nuestra conversación con Oscar Villacis, presentador y creador de First Gen American. La transcripción completa la puedes leer aquí.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guion para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

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A continuación, encuentra las noticias del jueves 10 de diciembre. 

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Aumentan casos de COVID-19 en grupo de reclusos y personal de prisión de hombres de New Hampshire

nh.gov

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del miércoles 9 de diciembre. 

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Guardia Nacional cubrirá personal de prisión en cuarentena por brote de COVID-19

La prisión estatal de hombres de New Hampshire está trayendo a la Guardia Nacional a cubrir por el personal que salió debido a un brote de coronavirus.

Emily Corwin for NHPR

 

New Hampshire's state prisons are expanding medically assisted treatment for alcohol and opioid use disorders. The program will be funded with around $2 million from a federal State Opioid Response grant focused on improving treatment and recovery initiatives across the state.

"Supervision" And Life On Parole

Jun 10, 2019
Sara Plourde; NHPR

The four-part podcast Supervision follows one New Hampshire man's life on parole. We talk about this series with reporter Emily Corwin, and discuss parole in N.H., including finding access to resources like housing, transportation, and mental health services, to finding a job and integrating back into life outside of prison.

Lobbying All The Way

Mar 1, 2019

When you visit the State House in Concord, you might notice some well-dressed people sporting bright orange name tags: lobbyists. What do lobbyists do and how does lobbying work?

Then we’re going inside drug court, a program designed to divert people with substance use disorders from prison.

Cheryl Senter / NHPR

 

Inmates with substance use disorder will now have someone to help them get recovery services after they leave state prison.

The initiative was piloted in 2018 in the women's prison in Concord and is now expanding to the men's prison in Berlin.

Department of Corrections Commissioner Helen Hanks says re-entry coordinators are needed because so many people in prison are struggling with addiction and many are in recovery. They face a high chance of recidivism or overdosing post release.

History of Concord, New Hampshire, from the original grant in seventeen hundred and twenty-five to the opening of the twentieth century

What does mass incarceration look like in New Hampshire?

For nearly two decades, the Furniture Masters of New Hampshire have been leading a program at the state men's prison in Concord. They teach a woodworking skill to inmates in the hobby shop, and return a month later to check on the progress.

For some inmates, these workshops have opened the door to mastering the craft of furniture making; and to a changed perspective on the world.

On this week's episode, we hear from these inmates, and from a UNH professor and woodworker wants to bring the same skills to incarcerated women.

Charlene Music

The two places could not be more different: the Dartmouth College campus and the Sullivan County jailhouse. Yet, in a new documentary, college students from Dartmouth and female inmates worked together to write short plays about what it’s like to be incarcerated. The process generates a conversation about privilege and the justice system.

Seven years in the making, the film debuts this Saturday at the White River Indie Festival. NHPR’s Peter Biello spoke with the documentary’s director, Signe Taylor, about the making of the film.

http://www.nh.gov/nhdoc/facilities/concord.html

  Efforts to install scanners into New Hampshire prisons appear to have hit a road block.

The plan to put six machines at a cost of more than $1 million was approved last year by the legislature. But the New Hampshire Department of Corrections says the language in the law is too broad, essentially requiring anyone to be scanned.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Updated on Jan. 13, 2017 at 5:07 PM:

Visiting hours will return to normal on Saturday at the state prison for men. Inmate visits were halted earlier this week after a series of likely drug overdoses left one man dead.

In the meantime, the department says it is investigating the type, source, and entry point of the drugs that caused the following three incidents.

 

  New Hampshire's corrections commissioner says authorities are investigating four drug overdoses — one of them fatal — at the state prison in Concord and at a transitional housing unit in Manchester.

The overdoses resulted in the cancellation of inmate visitation at the prison from Tuesday through Thursday.

Commissioner William Wrenn says the fatal overdose happened at the Calumet Transitional Housing Unit in Manchester. He said 48-year-old Michael Robert Cullen was found unresponsive Friday night. Efforts to revive him were unsuccessful.

Natasha Haverty

If you have a loved one behind bars, there are more ways than ever to stay connected: letters, phone calls, and just in the past couple of years, a new way: a video service that lets inmates and families communicate through a screen; along the lines of Skype. But there’s a catch: when jails add video visitation, they’re usually getting rid of in person visits. There's one place in New Hampshire, Cheshire County Jail, where that’s happening.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

New Hampshire has become the first state to launch a campaign solely aimed at breaking down the stigma around mental illness and improving treatment and prevention. But left unaddressed has been a population of mentally ill people at the state prison who are incredibly violent and have no place else to go.

Ryan Lessard for NHPR

The University of New Hampshire at Manchester and White Mountains Community College are partnering to allow students in certain programs to pay community college tuition rates for a four-year degree.

The program will be available to students with an Associate's degree in Criminal Justice or Internet Technology from White Mountains Community College.  After receiving that degree, students could go on to receive a Bachelor's degree from UNH Manchester while continuing to pay only the Community College tuition costs. 

Photo by Jackie Finn-Irwin via Flickr Creative Commons

Men and women incarcerated at New Hampshire state prisons won’t be getting Christmas cards this year.

That’s because of a new mail policy the Department of Corrections implemented. Some call it the harshest mail policy of any prison system in the US. Now one New Hampshire boy and his grandmother, with the help of the ACLU, are suing the state’s Department of Corrections. 

Brian Wilkins via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8dp2Hq

Last month China ended its controversial one-child policy – but is the change as radical as it’s been made out to be by officials and news outlets? Today, a reporter on China's new "two-child policy"... and why the country really needs to focus on sex-ed. Plus, Millennials are sometimes derided as a generation slacktivists, and don't have the spending power of their elders – but non-profits are betting on them for the future. From socially conscious spending, to gimmicky donation challenges, we explore how Millennials are changing the face of charitable giving.

Credit mikecogh via Flickr Creative Commons

 

A transgender woman has dropped a federal lawsuit against the Rockingham County claiming she suffered injuries after being classified as a man while an inmate.

Aja Kennedy, formerly known as Edward Brunetta, withdrew the suit from federal court in New Hampshire. She had claimed she was harassed and sexually assaulted while incarcerated at the Rockingham County jail in Brentwood.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Rockingham County attorneys said Wednesday the case was dropped without a settlement and that they had a "very good defense."

 

A former inmate at the Rockingham County prison is suing the county for allegedly not providing safe conditions inside their jail cells.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Alan Brien Sr. filed the suit Aug. 11, which states a fall from his cell's bunk last year caused "serious permanent injuries."

The suit states that Brien's bed was the top bunk, which had no ladder "or other safe mechanism to enable him to climb up from or down from the bunk."

Thomas Hawk via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/gYYzoZ

There’s plenty of evidence that drug use during pregnancy can harm the fetus, but should using illicit substances while pregnant be a criminal offense? On today’s show, an unfiltered look at what happens when expectant mothers are jailed for drug use.

Then, from Mexican cartels to Isis, the rise in kidnappings globally adds up to a 1.6 billion dollar “hostage industry”. Later in the show a journalist attends “Hostage Camp”, where wealthy travelers learn how to survive a kidnapping.  

Sue via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/w9jdX

We’ve all heard the saying “seeing is believing”, but does it ring true in a photoshopped-world? On today’s show we’ll try to find the answer to this question: why are we so easily duped by viral images:

Then, take the Talented Mr. Ripley, add several more aliases, and a dash of gruesome, and you get Christian Karl Gerhartsreiter. Writer Walter Kirn talks about being swindled by a man masquerading as a scion of the Rockefeller family, who was really a cunning imposter and a murderer.

Plus, a look back at one of the greatest hoaxes in American history, the Giant Indian of Cardiff.

Photo by Jackie Finn-Irwin via Flickr Creative Commons

 

In hopes of halting drug smuggling, the New Hampshire Department of Corrections is putting new restrictions on what kind of mail can be sent to inmates.

David Goehring via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/4mMuQE

After Walter Scott was fatally shot by a South Carolina police officer last month, his family speculated he fled the police because he feared going back to jail for unpaid child support. On today’s show: a closer look at child support policies and why some argue it keeps poor men trapped in a cycle of debt, unemployment and prison. 

Then, the modern answer to hieroglyphics, emoji can convey tone and emotion in a single image. Later we’ll delve into emoji use around the world, and what it reveals about cultural and national identities. 

Photo by Jackie Finn-Irwin via Flickr Creative Commons

 

State prison officials are prohibiting inmates from receiving greeting cards, decorative postcards or stationery with drawings and stickers under a new policy meant to clamp down on the influx of drugs.

The Concord Monitor reports the policy goes into effect May 1.

Plain stationery and postcards with content written in pencil or ink will be allowed. Tourist postcards or those with designs or pictures of any kind will not. Envelopes are removed before written content is given to inmates.

Jack Rodolico

Anyone can take a first aid class to learn how to perform CPR or splint a broken bone. But how should you respond to someone not in a physical health crisis, but a mental health crisis?

Mental health professionals in New Hampshire are promoting a course in mental health first aid. The goal is to train the general public to recognize the signs of mental illness - and encourage them to intervene.

For 20 years, Charlie fought bruising battles with mental illness. When he was at his lowest point, here’s how he describes his life.

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In Stanley Kubrick’s film 2001 A Space Odyssey, fear of future technologies takes center stage in the form of Hal 9000, the sentient, yet sinister, computer in charge of spacecraft Discovery One.

On today’s show, an instructor at the MIT Media Lab envisions a brighter future, in which the interaction between humans and technology will be useful, and even playful.

Plus, we’ll take a closer look at prison gangs, their ability to maintain order behind bars and how they influence life on the outside.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.

Gov. Maggie Hassan and other New Hampshire officials will hold a groundbreaking ceremony at the construction site of the long-awaited women's prison.

Related: Read Emily Corwin's story on how women's prison will be designed based on data 

Construction is beginning two decades after the state was first ordered to provide female inmates the same services as their male counterparts.

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