Medicaid

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

 

The New Hampshire State Senate approved a bipartisan bill on Thursday to help schools get reimbursed for providing medicaid-eligible services. 

The bill comes after months of confusion over how schools can take advantage of the Medicaid to Schools Program, which allows schools to receive reimbursement for providing services like check-ups, counseling, and speech pathology to students eligible for Medicaid, as long as the services come from a Medicaid-participating provider.

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The owner and employees of a Rochester taxi company have been charged with defrauding the state's Medicaid program.

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New Hampshire is one of 10 states selected by the Trump administration to receive a Medicaid grant aimed at improving treatment for pregnant mothers suffering from opioid misuse disorder.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

Governor Sununu signed an executive order on Wednesday aimed at streamlining the process for schools to recoup costs of providing Medicaid-eligible services.

The order will expedite the licensing and credentialing process for providers who work in schools but lack a license as a Medicaid participating provider, thus making their services ineligible for Medicaid reimbursement. 

State health officials say they are planning to apply for a waiver from the federal government that would loosen restrictions on how Medicaid dollars could be spent on mental health treatment in New Hampshire.

Federal law currently prohibits the use of Medicaid dollars to pay for mental health care at facilities with more than 16 beds, to prevent the so-called “warehousing” of mental health patients with public funds.

Michael Brindley / NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu and the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services are scrambling to help schools comply with Medicaid reimbursement rules to avoid massive fines from the federal government.

Schools can apply for partial reimbursement for health, substance abuse, and special education services provided to students eligible for Medicaid. About 90,000 youth under 18 are enrolled in Medicaid and would be eligible for services in schools.

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A federal judge has blocked the implementation of New Hampshire's Medicaid work requirement.

The ruling reverses a move by the Trump administration that allowed New Hampshire to impose a 100-hour-a-month work requirement on beneficiaries of expanded Medicaid. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

During the first month of a new Medicaid work requirement in New Hampshire, nearly 17,000 recipients were out of compliance, prompting Gov. Chris Sununu to announce Monday that the law’s penalties will be delayed through September.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

New Hampshire’s congressional delegation is speaking out against a federal lawsuit to repeal the Affordable Care Act. 

The case, Texas v. U.S., will be heard in the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday. It is brought by 18 states that say the individual mandate requiring people to purchase health insurance is unconstitutional. 

A ruling in their favor could overturn the Affordable Care Act entirely, a goal of many Republicans in Congress and the Trump administration.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

As a new work requirement for beneficiaries of New Hampshire’s expanded Medicaid program takes effect this month, some in the healthcare industry say early signs are pointing to a bumpy road ahead.

Ali Oshinskie / NHPR

Mental health care providers are reacting to Governor Chris Sununu's veto of a bill that would have provided new money for mental health services in the state.

The bill, backed mostly by Democrats, would have spent $3.5 million to raise the rates that Medicaid pays out for mental health services and substance use disorder treatments.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

 

Governor Chris Sununu has vetoed a bill that would have increased funding for Medicaid providers, saying that with a new budget in place soon, the measure is now redundant.

  

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A bill that seeks to limit the impact of a controversial new Medicaid work requirement is now headed to Governor Chris Sununu’s desk.

The so-called community engagement requirement is set to take effect in June. It will require some low-income people who get their health insurance through the state's expanded Medicaid program to complete 100 hours of work or other qualifying activities each month or risk losing their coverage.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The New Hampshire Executive Council on Wednesday approved a contract worth more than $900 million for three companies to run the state's Medicaid program.

 

About 180,000 people in New Hampshire are insured by either Medicaid, or expanded Medicaid.

 

Two of the companies, Well Sense and New Hampshire Healthy Families, are already providing those services.

 

Commissioner Jeffrey Meyers On Top D.H.H.S. Issues

Mar 26, 2019
Dan Tuohy for NHPR

We sit down with Department of Health and Human Services Commissioner Jeffrey Meyers. The Department of Health and Human Services is the largest state agency and accounts for approximately forty percent of the state budget. We discuss the state's ten-year mental health plan, as well as recent challenges to medicaid work requirements.  And we get an update on the state's hub and spoke system for addiction treatment, and concerns about the Division of Children, Youth and Families. 

GUEST:

Jeffrey Meyers - Appointed in 2016, Meyers is Commissioner of the N.H. Department of Health and Human Services. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Right now, around 50,000 people in New Hampshire get their health insurance through expanded Medicaid. As a creation of the Affordable Care Act, the program is designed to cover people who make too much money to qualify for traditional Medicaid, but not enough to afford private health insurance.

Beginning later this year, for some of those 50,000 people, there is a new string attached to that health insurance: a requirement they work at least 100 hours each month.

NHPR Staff

A battle is brewing over the state's new Medicaid "community engagement requirement," which requires certain beneficiaries of Medicaid to engage in various activities, including attending school or holding a job in order to receive coverage.  

New Hampshire is one of a handful of states with this type of arrangement, often called a "work requirement."

Sara Plourde For NHPR

New Hampshire has joined a handful of states that mandate some Medicaid recipients to engage in certain activities: for example, a job, school, or community services. But recent federal changes tightening certain aspects of the program, as well as proposed legislation, have renewed debate over the Granite State's approach. 

Dan Tuohy/ NHPR

The state's top health official told legislative budget writers Thursday that he believes the Medicaid reimbursement rates included in Governor Sununu's proposed budget are sufficient.

But top demcorats say those rates need to be boosted to improve access to care for low-income Granite Staters.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The Executive Council is delaying voting on contracts to manage the more than $900 million dollar state Medicaid program.

Right now, Wellsense and Centine manage the state's Medicaid program. This contract, which would pay the companies millions, would continue that though 2024, but also add a third provider, AmeriHealth Caritas.

Members of New Hampshire's Executive Council say they want more information before voting, particularly about AmeriHealth Caritas, which had been penalized by regulators in Iowa over its work on that state's Medicaid program.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

State officials say they are still working out how much it will cost to enforce a newly approved work requirement for some beneficiaries of New Hampshire's expanded Medicaid program.

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The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services announced on Tuesday that temporary rules are in place to expand the state’s Medicaid to Schools Program. 

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Last August the New Hampshire legislature passed a bill that would allow schools to be reimbursed for part of the costs associated with things like speech therapy, mental health counseling and nursing for all students who qualify for Medicaid.

Previously that reimbursement was only available for some students who qualify for Medicaid. But schools are not yet taking advantage of this additional federal money. 

A federal judge blocked work requirements in the state of Kentucky's Medicaid program last Friday.

New Hampshire has similar requirements as part of its renewed Medicaid expansion.

Republican Gov. Chris Sununu has signed a bill to continue New Hampshire's expanded Medicaid program for another five years.

The current program uses Medicaid funds to purchase private health plans for about 50,000 low-income residents. It would have expired this year if lawmakers didn't reauthorize it.

The bill also changes its structure to a more cost-effective managed care model. The plan also imposes new work requirements on enrollees and use 5 percent of liquor revenues to cover the state's cost as federal funding decreases.

Savannah Maher/NHPR

Representatives from six state-supported addiction treatment centers gathered at the Statehouse today to rally against decreased Medicaid reimbursement rates. The change, brought on by a switch in the way Medicaid recipients are insured, will take effect next year.

Providers say it will force them to cut services and eliminate inpatient beds instead of expanding to address New Hampshire's opioid epidemic. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Starting in 2019, people getting health insurance through New Hampshire’s Medicaid expansion program will have to comply with a new work and “community engagement” requirement in order to continue receiving coverage. 

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the federal agency that oversees Medicaid programs across the country, formally approved New Hampshire’s request to add the requirements on Monday.

After nearly two full hours of floor debate, the New Hampshire Senate green-lit a plan to keep New Hampshire's Medicaid expansion going for another five years.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

A plan to extend New Hampshire’s Medicaid expansion will have its first big test on Thursday, when it goes before the full Senate for a vote.

A Medicaid rule that's been on the books since the program was created bars states from using federal money on care provided in many residential mental health and substance use treatment facilities with more than 16 beds.

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