green new deal

The conversation on climate change has a new vigor in recent months, thanks in part to the Green New Deal. Though it was voted down in a procedural vote in the U.S. Senate, the non-binding resolution has intensified conversation on climate and yielded climate policy packages from both sides of the aisle: Republican Rep. Max Gaetz’s Green Real Deal and Senator Lamar Alexander’s A New Manhattan Project.

Jim Richman/Flickr

Climate change is a hot topic on Capitol Hill and on the 2020 presidential campaign trail. And it is mobilizing younger Americans: children suing the federal government, grassroots campaigns pushing for the Green New Deal, and student-led walkouts. 

As the legislature weighs net-metering and offshore wind, we talk with young New Hampshire leaders about the state's climate future. 

Annie Ropeik for NHPR

Democrats in Congress released their ambitious Green New Deal plan this week. It suggests sweeping reforms to rapidly de-carbonize the nation’s economy.

New Hampshire’s two representatives backed the idea of the plan while it was still in the works.

At a ribbon-cutting for a solar array at Newfields’ wastewater treatment plant Friday, Sen. Maggie Hassan said she's still studying the proposal.

But she says she welcomes any discussion in Congress of ways to tackle climate change while creating jobs.

Steve and Michelle Gerdes / Flicker CC

New Hampshire's members of Congress say they support the call for a select House committee on a "Green New Deal."

The campaign is being led by the group Sunrise Movement and incoming Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.

Her proposed committee would draft a plan by 2020 to move the U.S. economy off fossil fuels, and combat climate change, by creating new jobs and technology in renewable energy.