Drinking Water Standards

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

New Hampshire on Thursday adopted the country’s most sweeping limits for PFAS chemical contamination in drinking water.

The strict standards won approval from the state legislature’s administrative rules committee, along roughly party lines.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: January 11, 2019

Jan 10, 2019

With the governor signaling support for offshore wind energy, we talk with environmental reporter Annie Ropeik. We also discuss new limits on PFAS chemicals and arsenic in drinking water.  The state rolled-out the new program of "doorways" to addiction treatment services in a series of meetings around the state. And potential 2020 presidential primary candidate, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, will be the keynote speaker for a N.H. Democratic party event in February. Lauren Chooljian, NHPR Political Reporter, State of Democracy, is guest host.

www.infrastructurereportcard.org

The American Society of Civil Engineers has released their 2017 report card on New Hampshire’s infrastructure -- and the state is far from the honor roll.

A pair of bills aimed at addressing concerns over drinking water contamination went before lawmakers today.

The proposals come as several communities around the state grapple with emerging contaminants found in their water supplies.

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As New Hampshire regulators consider adopting the EPA’s PFOA health advisory as the state’s enforceable standard, a New Jersey committee has recommended setting a much lower standard in that state.

Ceyhun (Jay) Isik / https://flic.kr/p/cG7qFL

In recent weeks, confusion and unease have increased in several New Hampshire towns where contamination with the chemical PFOA has been detected in private wells.

Though the EPA has yet to determine a safe level of PFOA in drinking water, Sarah Pillsbury, the administrator for public drinking water with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, is hoping that's about to change. 

https://flic.kr/p/fA6veL / Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire environmental regulators and realtors have reached an agreement on how to communicate the risks associated with Radon in drinking water.

Materials and fact sheets available from the Department of Environmental Services previously recommended that homeowners “test the indoor air for radon and consult with radon mitigation and water treatment providers” whenever radon exceeds 2,000 picocuries per liter in well water, which was the lowest advisory level in the United States.

Perchlorate in Drinking Water

Dec 14, 2012
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