Coronavirus Coverage - FAQs | New Hampshire Public Radio

Coronavirus Coverage - FAQs

photo of sign saying vaccines
Todd Bookman/NHPR

Doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines are all being administered in New Hampshire  — marking a turning point, but not the end, of the COVID-19 pandemic. As the state and the country continue the monumental effort of immunizing people, here are answers to some questions you might have about the vaccine.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

As NHPR tracks the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in New Hampshire, we’ve been asking you to tell us how your life is changing because of coronavirus - and we’ve welcomed your questions.

Here, we answer some of your questions, and share other important information about the coronavirus and how to stay safe.

ULI Terwilliger Center for Housing / Flickr/CC

Escrito en inglés por Daniela Allee y Christina Phillips, traducción de María Aguirre

El lunes 15 de marzo, New Hampshire abrió su nueva ronda de asistencia de renta y utilidades (incluyendo Internet). Estamos respondiendo a ciertas preguntas frecuentes sobre quiénes cualifican para la asistencia y el proceso de aplicación. Lo que contestamos aquí es una mirada general del programa. Si tienes preguntas más detalladas, revisa la guía de preguntas en inglés del New Hampshire Housing Finance Authority. 

NHPR

New Hampshire is opening up its next round of assistance for rent, and utilities (including internet) at noon on Monday, March 15. We’re answering some frequently asked questions about who qualifies and the application process. What we answer here is a broad overview of the program. If you have more detailed questions, check out this FAQ from the New Hampshire Housing Finance Authority.

We're working on stories about the state's COVID housing assistance program.  Are you applying? If so, and you want to share your experience, reach out to our reporter Daniela Allee at dallee@nhpr.org.

Healthcare workers get vaccinated outside at a clinic at Elliot Hospital.
Jordyn Haime/NHPR

The Exchange spoke with Dr. Beth Daly, Chief of the Bureau of Infectious Disease Control at the N.H. DHHS, Dr. Benjamin Chan, the state epidemiologist, and Dr. Elizabeth Talbot, the state deputy epidemiologist, about COVID-19 vaccine access and safety. 

CDC.gov

State health officials said this week that they're prepared for a likely increase in demand for coronavirus contact tracing as schools and colleges reopen this fall. This process involves finding out exactly who an infected person might have exposed to a communicable disease. 

Gov. Chris Sununu has described New Hampshire's contact tracing program as one of the best in the country. But the state hasn't shared many details on the program until now. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

In an attempt to slow the spread of the coronavirus, Gov. Chris Sununu issued a series of executive orders in March shuttering huge segments of both economic and community life in New Hampshire. Suddenly, workers and industries were split into two camps: those deemed essential, and those not. 

More than 100 days later, nearly all corners of the state’s economy now have permission to reopen. At 11:59 p.m. on June 15, Sununu’s ‘Stay at Home’ order expired, as did the cap on gatherings of more than ten people. 

Governor Sununu has set aside $35 million from the CARES Act Coronavirus Relief Fund to provide housing assistance for individuals who have trouble paying their rent and utilities as a result of the pandemic.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu issued a stay-at-home order on March 26, 2020 in an effort to contain the spread of coronavirus in New Hampshire. Here is what you need to know about the amended order, which is now in effect until May 31. 

NOTE: THIS STORY CONTAINS OUTDATED INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE. PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR THE LATEST VERSION.

Bookmark NHPR's liveblog here for coronavirus updates in New Hampshire.

New Hampshire’s 'Stay at Home 2.0' – What Has Changed?

New Hampshire’s original stay-at-home order in response to the COVID-19 pandemic was set to expire on Monday, May 4. On Friday, May 1, Gov. Chris Sununu announced a plan to relax some aspects of that order and re-open parts of the economy.

Unemployment Insurance Application
Mediaweek via Flickr CC

Updated on April 27, 2020 at 10:24 a.m.  

Following an executive order from Governor Sununu and the passage of the federal CARES Act, many more people are now able to apply for unemployment benefits as a result of COVID-19, including those who need to quarantine, and those who are self-employed.

The Exchange spoke with Deputy Commissioner Richard Lavers of N.H. Employment Security in March and April. You can find those full conversations here and here.

Read all of NHPR's coronavirus coverage here.