Chris Sununu

josh rogers / nhpr

Governor Chris Sununu says he plans to push for more funding at the state university system for science and engineering education. 

Sununu used remarks at a New England Council breakfast to hint at some of future plans should he win reelection. Prime among them, the governor said, was boosting the number of home-grown workers to help power what Sununu expects to be a growing bio-tech sector.

NHPR Photo

Governor Chris Sununu says he can't judge Brett Kavanaugh's judicial temperament based on Kavanaugh's testimony before the U.S. Senate. 

Sununu signed a letter supporting Kavanaugh's nomination shortly after it was announced. Molly Kelly, his Democratic challenger, was deadset against Kavanaugh from the start. During a visit to a Concord health Clinic, Kelly said that adding Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court puts abortion rights at risk, and Sununu knows it.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

A handful of Republican governors facing re-election called on the U.S. Senate Thursday to delay a confirmation vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh to allow time for an investigation into sexual misconduct allegations.

The governors don't have an official role in the nomination process, but their voices could add pressure to the Senate's consideration and help distance themselves from President Donald Trump.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  We are a week into the general election and if one policy issue can be said to be at the center of the governor’s race, it may be paid family leave. Paid family leave has been a subject of longstanding debate in Concord, but until this year and this election – it’s never been what anyone would consider a political flashpoint. NHPR's Josh Rogers joined All Things Considered host Peter Biello to discuss why the matchup between Molly Kelly and Chris Sununu may make it one.  

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

New Hampshire’s timber industry scored a major victory today as legislators narrowly voted to overturn Gov. Chris Sununu’s veto of a bill subsidizing biomass plants.

But lawmakers fell just short of overturning another energy veto that had become intertwined with the biomass bill – one subsidizing net metering.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu hasn't always gotten his way with the Republcian-controlled Legislature. Its override of a biomass energy veto bill this week is but the freshest example. But Sununu told fellow Republicans at the party's Unity Breakfast Thursday that their work in Concord -- to cut taxes, reduce regulation, foster educational choice, and boost business development -- will help them win in November.

NHPR Staff

The New Hampshire Senate failed to override Gov. Chris Sununu’s veto of a death penalty repeal bill on Thursday.

As it did during the session, the Senate voted 14-10 in favor of repeal, which fell short of the two-thirds majority needed to overturn the veto.

The House and Senate both passed Senate Bill 593 repealing the use of the death penalty this session, but Sununu called it the “ultimate legal deterrent” and an important way to deliver justice for victims of crime.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

State legislators vote Thursday on whether to override two controversial vetoes of bills about energy.

One would subsidize biomass power plants. The other would expand net metering in New Hampshire.

Governor Chris Sununu says both bills would cost residents and businesses too much.

But supporters from the state’s established timber industry and its newer renewable energy sector disagree.

Gov. Chris Sununu/Twitter

For the Democratic candidates running for New Hampshire governor, it’s crunch time. All week long Steve Marchand and Molly Kelly have worked to get attention from voters and the press. Between now and Tuesday, that hustling will be almost non-stop.

For Republican Gov. Chris Sununu, who is running for reelection but doesn’t face a primary, the political pace is decidedly less frantic. Incumbency helps, but so does Sununu’s personality. 

 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Hundreds of people from the timber and renewable energy industries crowded the New Hampshire State House lawn Thursday, rallying for legislators to overturn two vetoes they say could put them out of business.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu announced plans last week to study whether New Hampshire schools should be required to start after Labor Day.

But some families who flocked to Seacoast beaches on the holiday Monday said they don’t really care when school starts.

Dawn Szelog’s family had staked out a spot among the crowds at Wallis Sands State Beach in Rye by late morning, as the temperature neared 90.

NHPR Staff

Governor Chris Sununu issued an executive order today establishing a commission to study the impact of New Hampshire schools setting start dates before Labor Day, and to evaluate whether schools should be required to start after the holiday.

(Scroll down to read the order.)

This comes as many New Hampshire kids head back to school.

Stuart Meek; Wikimedia Commons

Governor Chris Sununu wants federal regulators to speed up approval of new tick repellants and other products that could help prevent Lyme Disease in the state.

Sununu wrote a letter to the Environmental Protection Agency about the issue this week.

The EPA is currently reviewing insecticidal and repellant uses of substances like nootkatone, an essential oil found in grapefruit and Alaska cypress trees.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire Attorney General’s office is asking businesses that receive sales tax bills from other states to notify them so it can investigate possible scams.

The action comes in the wake of the Supreme Court’s ruling earlier this year that cleared the way for states with a sales tax to require business that sell goods online to collect and remit that tax on their behalf. The Wayfair decision creates concern in New Hampshire, where businesses lack experience collecting a sales tax.

flickr/creative commons

The mayors of New Hampshire's 13 cities are pushing back against Gov. Chris Sununu's recent veto of two energy bills.

The mayors plan to send a letter to legislative leaders, asking them to overturn the vetoes in September.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Gubernatorial candidate Steve Marchand will appear on NHPR's The Exchange Tuesday, Aug. 14, as part of the show's coverage of the 2018 primary elections.

Marchand, the former mayor of Portsmouth, is running for the Democratic nomination for governor. Also running is former state Senator Molly Kelly. Kelly was given the opportunity to appear with Marchand, but declined the show's invitation.

The winner of the Democratic primary on Tuesday, Sept. 11 will take on Republican Gov. Chris Sununu, who is running unopposed.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu was with business leaders and state legislators in Epping Friday, talking about lowering energy costs in the state.

Sununu spoke at Sig Sauer's firearms training range. He says retaining big, industrial employers like Sig Sauer means keeping energy costs down.

"These jobs could be easily lost if we're not putting a lot of these manufacturers first, their needs first, understanding what's important to them to create our thriving economy,” he says.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The two Democratic candidates for New Hampshire governor did their best to differentiate themselves at a forum in Exeter Wednesday night.  

The Rockingham County Democrats hosted the event. It was one of the first times Molly Kelly and Steve Marchand have debated face to face in their primary campaign.

Many in the audience asked questions in search of distinctions – but the answers they heard focused more on style than policy.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 27, 2018

Jul 26, 2018

New Hampshire House lawmakers fail to pass a challenge to the Internet sales tax, an apparent rebuke to Governor Chris Sununu and the Senate, which had unanimously approved the original bill. In a tense meeting with EPA officials, Nashua residents demand more cleanup at a toxic site tapped for redevelopment. And state officials hold a public hearing on how best to use $23 million in federal funds to fight the opioid crisis.

GUESTS:

Dean Spiliotes - Civic scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at SNHU and author of the website NH Political Capital.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

By all accounts yesterday was an embarrassing day for political leaders in Concord. The bill they crafted, at Gov. Chris Sununu’s direction, aimed to blunt a U.S. Supreme court ruling that could force local business to collect taxes for other states. It was rejected by the New Hampshire House. NHPR’s Josh Rogers and Peter Biello talked about the political ramifications of the bill's failure, particularly for Sununu.

Annie Ropeik for NHPR

Smuttynose Brewery is back up to speed on the Seacoast after being sold at auction earlier this year.

North Hampton-based Runnymede Investments bought Smuttynose after that auction, and brought in former Boston Beer Company CEO Rich Lindsay to head up the brewery.

NHPR Staff

The Executive Council will vote Wednesday on Governor Chris Sununu’s request for a special legislative session this summer.

The call for a session stems from the Supreme Court’s recent decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair, in which the majority of justices ruled that states that impose a sales tax can require businesses in other states to collect and remit that tax on their behalf.

New Hampshire Timberland Owners Association

Governor Chris Sununu is standing by his veto of a bill to boost the biomass industry – even as more of the wood-burning plants say they may shut down as a result.

A wood buyer for Bridgewater Biomass confirmed Tuesday that the plant took the veto as a signal about the industry's future, and stopped buying new wood in late June.

The Pinetree Power plants in Tamworth and Bethlehem did the same, according to spokeswoman Carol Churchill of their parent company, ENGIE North America.

Republican Gov. Chris Sununu has signed a bill to continue New Hampshire's expanded Medicaid program for another five years.

The current program uses Medicaid funds to purchase private health plans for about 50,000 low-income residents. It would have expired this year if lawmakers didn't reauthorize it.

The bill also changes its structure to a more cost-effective managed care model. The plan also imposes new work requirements on enrollees and use 5 percent of liquor revenues to cover the state's cost as federal funding decreases.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

An intern working for New Hampshire Senator Maggie Hassan was caught on video swearing at President Donald Trump last week.

Senator Maggie Hassan's intern yelled, "Mr. President………" followed by an expletive, across the Capitol Rotunda at President Trump as his entourage entered the building.

That Hassan decided to suspend the intern, Keene State College Student Caitlin Marriott, for one week was first reported late Monday.

The video of the incident has since gone viral. Governor Sununu says he hopes Senator Hassan will decide to do what he called "the right thing."

josh rogers / nhpr

Governor Chris Sununu signaled he'd veto the death penalty repeal long before lawmakers sent one to his desk. So, at the event his press team billed as an announcement on the repeal bill, the only real suspense was over how many police officers Sununu could squeeze into his office to witness his veto.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

A bipartisan bill raising the marriage age in New Hampshire to 16 is now law after a signing ceremony in Concord.

The measure, which was backed by Governor Chris Sununu and championed by Cassie Levesque, a teenage Girl Scout from Barrington, raises the age from 13 for girls and 14 for boys.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu is reportedly set to veto at least one bill that would subsidize alternative forms of energy.

Sununu plans to veto one or two of the high-profile energy bills legislators passed this session, according to New Hampshire Journal.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu has signed a bill allowing him to appoint more private citizens to the state Site Evaluation Committee and requiring them to undergo more training.

The SEC is tasked with approving big energy projects in New Hampshire.

Right now, it includes the state's three public utilities commissioners and other state agency heads, plus two public members – citizens, appointed by the governor, who have some relevant expertise.

NHPR File Photo

 

New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu has signed a bill to spend about $102 million produced by an unexpectedly high business tax revenue this year.

The bill signed by the Republican governor Wednesday adds $10 million to the state's Rainy Day Fund; grants $20 million repair red-listed bridges; returns $10 million to communities for road and bridge improvements; adds funding for affordable housing; and increases funds to combat the opioid crisis.

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