WebHeader_Grove.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Join as a $13-a-month sustainer and get the retro NHPR t-shirt!
Politics
Final results: Summary results | Town resultsThe BasicsThe New Hampshire primary is a mainstay in American electoral politics. Every four years, voters gather to help determine the Republican and/or Democratic nominee for President. While the state only has 12 electoral votes in 2012 (normally it’s 24, but the Republican National Committee penalized the state party for moving up the event date), the primary’s position as one of the earliest contests gives the state out-sized influence over the nomination process.Only the Iowa caucuses come before New Hampshire’s primary. Traditionally, New Hampshire’s broad-based primary contest has been seen as a counter-weight to Iowa’s more drawn-out caucus process, which tends to draw a smaller core of party faithful. In the case of the 2012 Republican race, New Hampshire’s electorate is seen to represent the more libertarian-leaning, fiscally conservative wing of the party, while Iowa voters are seen as representing the socially conservative wing of the GOP base.N.H. Primary summary provided by StateImpact - NH reporter, Amanda Loder

Bass Snags Bipartisan Endorsement

Republican Elephant & Democratic Donkey-Icons
DonkeyHotey
/
Flickr Creative Commons

The two men who headed the bipartisan Simpson-Bowles Commission, which made recommendation on how to lower the federal deficit and balance the budget, have endorsed Congressman Charlie Bass. 

If you opened up the Concord Monitor, New Hampshire Union-Leader or Nashua Telegraph Wednesday, a full-page ad may have caught your eye.  The headline: “An Open Letter To New Hampshire Voters Who Care About America’s Economic Future…No Matter What Your Political Party.” 

In this open letter, Republican Alan Simpson and Democrat Erskine Bowles endorsed Republican Congressman Charlie Bass’s bid for reelection.  As Bass frequently notes on the stump, he was one of a handful of politicians who supported a budget based on the commission’s work.  In the ad, Simpson and Bowles note their supporters paid a political price. They write, “We need members of Congress who have the guts to ignore these scare tactics and look at the substance of real solutions that will help get our great nation back on track.” 

Bass’s Democratic challenger, Ann McLane Kuster, has criticized him on the campaign trail for voting for both the Simpson-Bowles-inspired budget bill and the Ryan budget—on the same day.

Related Content