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Internet Tax Ban Takes a Step Forward

Internet steve Rhode.jpg
Flkr Creative Commons / Steve Rhode
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The Senate Finance committee has voted unanimously to recommend banning a so-called “internet tax”. The bill would clear up the confusion surrounding the state’s Communications Services Tax.

Salem Senator Chuck Morse says two months ago, internet providers approached him to say that the state was starting to get serious about collecting taxes on internet. So he decided to do something about it.

"The amendment is very simple," Morse says, "New Hampshire is making a statement, it will not tax the internet, that’s it."

The industry is thrilled with the proposal, because they would be able to offer cheaper internet. But that doesn’t come for free.

According to state revenue officials the change would cost at least $6 million in taxes already being collected.

The DRA also says as more communication shifts to the internet, this language could lead to bigger holes in the budget.

 

Sam Evans-Brown has been working for New Hampshire Public Radio since 2010, when he began as a freelancer. He shifted gears in 2016 and began producing Outside/In, a podcast and radio show about “the natural world and how we use it.” His work has won him several awards, including two regional Edward R. Murrow awards, one national Murrow, and the Overseas Press Club of America's award for best environmental reporting in any medium. He studied Politics and Spanish at Bates College, and before reporting was variously employed as a Spanish teacher, farmer, bicycle mechanic, ski coach, research assistant, a wilderness trip leader and a technical supporter.

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