WebHeader_Grove.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Make a gift to NHPR and have a Valentine's message to a loved one read on air!
The Exchange
Some Facts About New Hampshire’s Infrastructure:New Hampshire has approximately 17,000 miles of state and town roads, turnpikes and interstate highways. There are 3,795 bridges in the state. As of 2010, the New Hampshire Department of Transportation plowed more than 800 lane miles of roads and put down 180,000 tons of salt for snow and ice control annually.The state was given a “C” grade by the American Society of Civil Engineers for the condition of its roads and bridges. New Hampshire was rated among the worst in the country for the poor condition of its bridges by Transportation For America. On average, bridges are older in New Hampshire than those in the rest of the country. There are hundreds of bridges on the so-called “red list,” which means that the bridges have major structural problems and need to be repaired or replaced.The state also has a poor record when it comes to public transportation. New Hampshire has no comprehensive rail system and is rated 42nd in terms of investment in public transportation according to the State Department of Transportation.The majority of New Hampshire’s infrastructure funding comes from vehicle registration fees and gas taxes. The state takes out fewer bond loans than other states and considers its funding a “pay as you go” system. The gas tax, the lowest in New England, has not been raised since 1991. The 2011 Legislature did away with a motor vehicle fee increase. That change has meant more $30 million a year in cuts to DOT.The $800 million expansion of I-93 from Salem to Manchester began in 2006, but has been delayed several times because of a lack of funding. Supporters of the expansion say it will update one of the country’s most congested highways and bring needed tourism revenue to the more isolated and less economically robust northern part of the state. Traffic on I-93 has increased 600 percent since the highway was built in the 1960s and approximately 80,000 cars now drive on it each day.Summary provided by StateImpact NH

Gearing Up For Another Gas Tax Debate

rob.ewart_.jpg
rob.ewart
/
Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire Transportation Commissioner Christopher Clement has long pointed out that when it comes to our infrastructure, we’re not doing too well. Nearly 40% of the state’s roads are considered in poor condition, and almost one hundred and fifty bridges are red listed. Although Clement remains ‘revenue agnostic’ over where the funding comes from, others have a clear idea: raising the gas tax, which hasn’t been raised in New Hampshire in over twenty years.  Supporters say this would be the most comprehensive and fair solution. But others say that this is the wrong time for a new tax and worry that some funds would be diverted away from roads.  Meanwhile there are other ideas on the table being tried in other states that may gain attention in the Granite State. 

GUESTS:

  • Candace Bouchard– Democratic State Representative from Concord and chairwoman of Transportation Committee. Sponsor of gas tax and alternative fuel tax bills.
  • Jeanie Forrester – Republican State Senator from Meredith and vice chair of the Public and Municipal Affairs and the Finance Committees.
  • Jaime Rall– transportation policy expert for the National Conference of State Legislatures, the national organization that represents the legislatures of every state. She is joining us from the NCSL headquarters in Denver, Colorado.

CALLOUTS:

  • Brian Wallstin – NHPR’s digital journalist. He wrote an article this week looking at the gas tax question in N.H.
Related Content